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Publication numberUS2991867 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1961
Filing dateMar 13, 1959
Priority dateMar 13, 1959
Publication numberUS 2991867 A, US 2991867A, US-A-2991867, US2991867 A, US2991867A
InventorsSchuller James T
Original AssigneeNat Vendors Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin apparatus
US 2991867 A
Images(7)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 11, 1961 J. T. SCHULLER COIN APPARATUS 7 Sheets- Sheet 1 Filed March 13, 1959 JM T 5% M ya.

July 11, 1961 J. T. SCHULLER 2,991,857

com APPARATUS Filed March 13, 1959 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 5Q FIG.2

nn-null July 11, 1961 J. T. SCHULLER COIN APPARATUS 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 13, 1959 July 11, 1961 J. T. SCHULLER 2,991,867

COIN APPARATUS Filed March 13, 1959 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 July 11, 1961 J. T. SCHULLER I 2,991,867

COIN APPARATUS 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 13, 1959 July 11, 1961 Filed March 15, 1959 FIG. I0

J. T. SCHULLER COIN APPARATUS 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Wow/r11 J. T. SCHULLER COIN APPARATUS July 11, 1961 '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed March 15, 1959 FIG.

Patented July 11, 1961 2,991,867 COIN APPARATUS James T. Schulller, St. Anns, Mo., assignor to National Vendors, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Filed Mar. 13, 1959, Ser. No. 799,294 20 Claims. (Cl. 19418) This invention relates to coin apparatus, and more particularly to such apparatus for controlling the operation of a Vending machine or the like.

The invention is an improvement upon the coin apparatus shown in the copending coassigned application of Alvin W. Holstein and James T. Schuller, Serial No. 629,749, filed December 20, 1956. That coin apparatus comprises a coin-actuated totalizer unit adapted to totalize the amount of coins deposited in the vending machine, this unit including a plurality of indexing stops for holding certain feelers out of operation unless an appropriate amount in coin has been deposited. The stops are rotatable away from a retracted or zero position in response to the deposit of coins, the advance of the stops being proportional to the amount deposited, and are biased to return to the zero position. A reset lever is provided for releasing the stops for return to zero position thereby to reset the apparatus for the next dispensing operation. If, however, the stops should fail to return or be delayed in returning to zero position for some reason (as, for example, because of dirt in the mechanism), the stops will remain in position permitting operation of one or more of the feelers, which may allow operation of the machine without further insertion of coins. Among the several objects of this invention may be noted the provision of a coin apparatus of the class described with means for preventing operation of the machine without further insertion of coins if the stops should for any reason fail to reset to zero position or be delayed in resetting to zero position at the conclusion of a dispensing operation; the provision of such means which acts positively to lock the feelers out of operation until the stops have reset to zero; and the provision of such means which is economical to provide and reliable in operation. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which one of various possible embodiments of the invention is illustrated,

FIG. 1 is a front elevation of a coin apparatus in which this invention is embodied;

FIG. 2 is a rear elevation of the coin apparatus;

FIG. 3 is a view corresponding to FIG. 1 with a front cover removed, and certain parts broken away;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged horizontal cross section taken on line 44 of FIG. 1, showing the totalizer unit of the apparatus;

FIG. 5 is a generally horizontal cross section taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a vertical cross section taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 3;

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 are vertical sections showing a nickel chute, a dime chute and a quarter chute, respectively, of the apparatus;

FIG. 10 is a vertical section of the totalizer unit taken on line 1010 of FIG. 4, also showing some parts in front of the plane of the section;

FIG. 11 is a vertical section of the totalizer unit taken on line 1111 of FIG. 4, also showing some parts in front of the plane of the section;

FIG. 12 is a vertical section taken on line 1212 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 13 is a front elevation of a pawl-carrying disk element of the totalizer unit of the apparatus;

FIG. 14 is a rear elevation of a ratchet member of the totalizing unit;

FIG. 15 is an exploded view illustrating the parts of the totalizing unit, being in section and viewed as on line 15-15 of FIG. 1; and,

FIG. 16 is a view in elevation showing a stop means of the totalizer unit.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring to FIGS. l-6 of the drawings, a coin handling unit of this invention is shown to comprise a main mechanism plate 1 having left and right side flanges 3 and 5 and a front cover plate 7 having left and right side flanges 8 and 9 which fit on the outside of flanges 3 and 5. Mounted on plate 1 are three latch release levers R1, R2 and R3 (see FIGS. 2, 5 and 6). These normally occupy a retracted position, and are movable away from their retracted position for releasing three latches (not shown) of the vending machine in which the coin handling unit is used. The vending machine may be of the type shown in the copending coassigned Holstein et al. applications Serial No. 589,918, filed June 7, 1956, and the abovementioned application Serial No. 629,749, filed December 20, 1956, and the latches therein may be similar to the latches L1, L2 and L3 which are shown in these applications. The latch release levers are controlled by three feeler levers F1, F2 and F3 pivoted at 11 on the inside of plate 1. These feeler levers are controlled by rotatable indexing stop means designated in its entirety by the reference character 13 and including three individual indexing stops S1, S2 and S3. Stop S1 controls feeler F1,

stop S2 controls feeler F2 and stop S3 controls feeler F3.

Stop means 13 is part of a coin totalizer unit 15 mounted on the inside of plate 1 for totalizing the value of coins deposited in the vending machine. The coin totalizer unit 15 includes an arm constituted by a trip wire 17 pivoted to swing on the axis of a shaft 19 and having a finger 21 at its free end which extends across three coin chutes NC, DC and QC (see FIGS. 5 and 79) of a coin chute assembly 23 mounted on the inside of plate 1. Chute NC is for nickels, chute DC is for dimes and chute QC is for quarters.

The arrangement is such that a coin dropping in any one of the coin chutes swings the trip wire 17 down from its raised retracted position of FIG. 3 through an angle corresponding to the value of the coin. The coin then escapes from the trip wire, the wire swings back up to its raised retracted position, and on its upward swing it acts to index the stop means 13 forward (rotate it counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 3) a number of steps corresponding to the value of the coin. A nickel indexes the stop means 13 forward one step, a dime indexes the stop means forward two steps, and a quarter indexes the stop means forward five steps, as will be made clear. The stop means 13 normally occupies a so-called zero position in which it blocks all three feelers F1, F2 and F3 from movement sufiicient fully to actuate the latch release levers R1, R2 and R3. If a suflicient amount in coin is deposited, the stop means is indexed or advanced (rotated counterclockwise) a sufficient number of steps to bring it into position clearing one or more of the feelers for full movement to enable actuation of the latch release levers. The stop means 13 is biased to return to the zero position, and the unit 15 includes a rset lever 25 for releasing the stop means to return to zero position. If, however, for some reason the stop means should not respond to operation of the reset lever and should remain in its advanced position, it would be possible for someone repeatedly to operate the vending machine and obtain part or all the merchandise therein without depositing any coins.

In order to prevent this, in accordance with this invention the unit 15 includes a lockout lever 27 (see FIG. 10) and mechanism controlling this lever to cause it to swing into position blocking the feelers F1, F2 and F3 against full movement any time the stop means 13 should fail to return to zero position upon operation of the reset lever 25. With the feelers blocked, the latch release levers R1, R2, R3 cannot be operated, thus locking the vending machine out of operation until the stop means is reset to zero.

The three latch release levers R1, R2 and R3 are identical. Each consists of a rod bent to provide an axial portion 29, a radial arm 31 at one end of portion 29, a radial arm 33 at the other end of portion 29, and a finger 35 parallel to portion 29 at the end of arm 33. The axial portions 29 of the three levers are rotatably held in horizontal position on the inside of main plate 1 under a retaining plate 37 with arms 31 accommodated in a space between the coin chute assembly 23 and the right side flange of plate 1. Arm 33 of the upper lever R3 extends through an upper vertical slot 39 in plate 1 to the outside of plate 1. Arm 33 of each of levers R2 and R1 extends through a lower vertical slot 41 in plate 1 to the outside of plate 1. Fingers 35 of the levers R1, R2 and R3 extend horizontally on the outside of plate 1 and are engageable with the outside of plate 1 to determine the retracted position of each of the three levers R1, R2, R3.

Feelers F1, F2 and F3 (which are identical) are pivoted intermediate their ends on the common pivot at 11, F3 being the outside lever of the three. Portions of these feelers to the right of pivot 11 extend in front of the coin chute assembly 23 and are connected to arms 31 of levers R1, R2 and R3, respectively, by links 43, 45 and 47. Portions of these feelers to the left of pivot 11 are angled downward to extend under the unit 15 and have feeler fingers 51, 53 and 55 extending upward in position for engagement with stops S1, S2 and S3, respectively, upon clockwise swinging of the levers from the retracted position in which they apepar in FIG. 3. The retracted position of feelers F1, F2 and F3 is determined by engagement of fingers 35 of the latch release levers R1, R2 and R3 with the outside of plate 1. When the levers F1, F2 and F3 are in retracted position, fingers 51, 53 and 55 are clear of the stops to permit the latter to rotate freely (note the space between the upper ends of the fingers and stops in FIG. 3). Feelers F1, F2 and F3 and levers R1, R2 and R3) are biased to their retracted position by a bell crank lever 57 pivoted at 59 on the coin chute assembly 23. Lever 57 is biased by a spring 61 to swing counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 3 and has a pin 63 at its right end engageable with the bottom edges of feelers F1, F2 and F3 to swing the latter counterclockwise. At its left end, lever 57 carries a roller 65 which extends through a slot 66 (see FIG. 1) in cover plate 7. Lever 57, at its right end, is connected to feelers F1, F2 and F3 by three tension springs 67, 69 and 71, respectively (see FIGS. 3 and 6). The arrangement is such that when lever 57 swings clockwise from its FIG. 3 retracted position (in which it holds the feelers F1, F2 and F3 in their FIG. 3 retracted position) it may act through the tension springs 67, 69 and 71 to swing the feelers clockwise from their retracted position if the feelers are free to swing. If the feelers are not free to swing, pin 63 moves down away from them, and springs 67, 69 and 71 simply stretch.

The main plate 1 and cover plate 7 have registering openings 73 and 75 (see FIGS. 3 and 1) which, when the coin handling unit is mounted in a vending machine, accept a shaft 77 which constitutes part of the vending machine. This shaft 77 corresponds to the shaft 49 shown in application Serial No. 589,918 and to the shaft 253 shown in application Serial No. 629,749. Fixed on the end of shaft 77 in front of the cover plate 7 is a cam 79 having a cam edge 81 and a cam slot 83 (see FIG. 1). Cam edge 81 is engageable by the roller 65 on lever 57. It will be understood that cam 79 is rotated clockwise as viewed in FIG. 1 away from the retracted position in which it is shown in FIG. 1, then returned to its retracted position when a purchaser pulls out a knob of the vending machine and then returns the knob in the same manner as described for the crank arm 515 shown in application Serial No. 589,918. Cam edge 81 is so formed that when cam 79 swings clockwise away from its retracted FIG. 1 position, lever 57 is swung clockwise from its retracted FIG. 3 position during the initial part of the clockwise movement of the cam. As the cam continues its clockwise movement, its tail end moves out from under roller 65, and then spring 61 returns lever 57 counterclockwise.

The coin chute assembly 23 extends down from the top of the main plate 1 adjacent the right side flange 5 of plate 1, leaving space between the left side of the coin chute assembly 23 and the left side flange 3 of plate 1 for the unit 15. The dime chute DC of assembly 23 is located between the nickel chute NC and the quarter chute QC, the quarter chute being on the inside of the dime chute toward plate 1, the nickel chute being on the outside of the dime chute away from plate 1 (see FIG. 5). The coin chute assembly 23 comprises a casting 85 formed with a groove on one side thereof forming the quarter chute QC and a casting 87 formed with grooves on opposite sides thereof forming the dime and nickel chutes. A plate 89 is provided between castings 85 and 87 serving as a partition between the quarter and dime chutes, and a cover plate 91 is provided overlying the outside of casting 87 serving as the outside wall of the nickel chute. Each of the castings 85 and 87 and the plates 89 and 91 is made with an arcuate slot so as to provide an arcuate slot 93 through the entire assembly 23. This slot registers with the nickel chute NC from the upper end of the slot through a portion 93N of the slot having a length approximately one-fifth the entire length of the slot (see FIG. 7). It registers with the dime chute DC from its upper end through a portion 93D of its length, 93D being approximately twice as long as 93N (see FIG. 8). It registers with the quarter chute QC throughout its entire length 93Q (FIG. 9). The coin chute assembly 23 is held together and secured to plate 1 by means of bolts such as indicated at 95, with a space between plate 1 and assembly 23 to accommodate the trip wire 17 and levers Rl-R3. The upper end of the assembly 23 is positioned in a gap 99 in a top flange 101 on plate 1, and the upper ends of the coin chutes are open.

It will be understood that the vending machine has a slot for nickels, dimes and quarters. Coins deposited in this slot enter a coin selector and slug rejector device (not shown) located above the coin chute assembly 23 to deliver nickels to the nickel chute NC, dimes to the dime chute DC and quarters to the quarter chute QC. The coin selector and slug rejector device also acts to reject coins of improper denominations (pennies) and spurious coins. Coin selector and slug rejector devices suitable for the purpose are well known: see, for example, U.S. Patent 2,292,628.

Totalizer unit 15 comprises a rear or base plate 103, an intermediate plate and a front cover plate 107. The base plate 103 is a die casting, formed with four forwardly extending tubular spacer posts 109. The intermediate plate 105 is a sheet metal plate having holes 113 registering with the tubular posts 109. The front cover plate 107 is a die casting, formed with four rearwardly extending spacer posts 115 the ends of which engage plate 105, the plates 103, 105 and 107 being held in assembly by screws 117 (see FIG. 15) received in the posts. The base plate 103 is formed with a rearwardly extending circular cup portion 119. This fits in an opening 120 in plate 1. Interiorly of the base of this cup portion is a recess 121. Fitted in this recess is a bearing 123 (which may be made of nylon, for example). This bearing is held in the recess by a flat retainer ring 125 riveted to base plate 103 as indicated at 126. The totalizer shaft 19 has one end received in bearing 123. Shaft 19 extends outward from base plate 103, having its other end received in a hole 127 in a cap 129 (which may be made of plastic such as nylon). The front cover plate 107 has an opening 131 receiving the cap, the latter having bayonet lugs 133 engaging the inside face of plate 107 to hold it in assembly therewith and allowing for its removal by turning to align the lugs 133 with notches 135 in plate 107. The cover plate 7 has an opening 137 accommodating the cap. A retaining plate 139 is secured to the outside of the cap 129 and has a notch 141 for receiving a locking member 143 for holding the cap against turning.

A pawl carrier constituted by a disk 145 having a hub 147 is rotatably mounted on the totalizer shaft 19 adjacent bearing 123. Trip wire 17 has one end fixed to the disk 145 as by solder such as indicated at 149. Wire 17 extends radially from the disk 145 in the space between the plate 1 and the coin chute assembly 23 to the slot 93, where it has the finger 21 at its free end extending forward through the slot 93 across all three chutes NC, DC, QC. A clock spring 151 has one end fixed to the hub 147 of the disk and its other end fixed to a post 153 mounted in base plate 103 for biasing the hub 147, disk 145 and the wire 17 to rotate counterclockwise as viewed in FIGS. 3, l0 and 11 to a raised retracted position determined by engagement of the wire with a post 155 which extends from the base plate 103. Post 153 may be turned for adjustment of the spring bias on the disk 145.

Spring 151 is located on the side of the disk 145 toward the bearing 123. Pivoted at 157 on the other side of the disk 145 is a driving pawl 159 (see FIGS. 13 and 15). Disk 145 also carries a leaf spring 161 biasing the pawl 159 toward engagement with a series of ratchet teeth 163 on a ratchet member 165. This ratchet member 165 has an elongate hub 167 mounted on the totalizer shaft 19 independently of disk 145. Collars 169 are provided on shaft 19 holding the ratchet member 165 against axial movement thereon, while leaving it free to rotate relative to the shaft 19. Member 165 is so formed as to have a disk portion 171 peripherally formed with holding ratchet teeth 173. Teeth 163 are driving teeth, being formed on an annular flange 175 of smaller diameter than disk 171 projecting rearward from disk 171. Ratchet member 165 is biased to rotate clockwise as viewed in FIG. by a clock spring 177 having one end secured to the hub 167 of the ratchet member and its other end engaging a pin 179 onthe intermediate plate 105. Spring 177 is lighter and weaker than spring 151 (see FIG. 4). The elongate hub 167 of ratchet member 165 extends outward beyond plate 105 through a hole .181 in the latter. Plate 105' has an arcuate slot 183 (see FIGqlO) partially surrounding hole 181 and leading into a relatively enlarged opening 185 in plate 105. Ratchet disk 171 has a control finger 187 extending forward through opening 185 on the radius of the arcuate slot 183 parallel to the shaft 19.

Pivoted at 189 on the totalizer base plate 103 is a holding pawl 191 engageable with the holding teeth 173 on the ratchet member 165. The holding pawl 191 is biased toward engagement with the holding teeth 173 by a spring 193. The reset lever 25 is pivoted at 195 on the base plate 103. Reset lever 25 is biased by a spring 197 to swing clockwise on its pivot 195 to a retracted position determined by its engagement with a stop 199 on the base plate -103. It has a downwardly extending tail 201 engageable with the driving pawl 159 and a pin 203 engageable with the holding pawl 191 when it swings away from its FIG. 11 retracted position for releasing these pawls from the respective ratchet teeth. When the pawls 159 and v191 are released, clock spring 177 is adapted to rotate the ratchet member 165 clockwise to a zero position determined by engagement 6 of finger 187 with a shoulder 205 defined by opening 185 in the intermediate plate 105.

The holding pawl 191 and reset lever 25 are located between the intermediate plate and the base plate 103. Lockout lever 27 is pivoted at 207 on the plate 105 (see FIGS. 10 and 15). This lockout lever 27 is biased to'swing counterclockwise by a spring 209. Reset lever 25 carries a pin 211 which extends through opening 185 in plate 105 and which is adapted to engage an arm 212 on the lockout lever 27 when the reset lever 25 is swung counterclockwise for swinging the lockout lever 27 clockwise a small amount from its FIG. 10 position against the bias of spring 209. A latch 213 for the lookout lever is pivoted at 215 on the plate 105. This latch 213 carries a weight 217 biasing it to swing clockwise. It has a tail 219 which projects into opening 185 and into the path of finger 187 on ratchet member 165, being engageable' by the finger 187 when the ratchet member 165 rotates to its zero position thereby to hold the latch 213 in the latching position in which it is shown in FIG. 10 against the bias of weight 217. The latch 213 carries a pin 221. When the latch 213 is in its latchnig position, this pin is located above and is engageable by an upper arm 223 on the lockout lever 27 to hold the latter against swinging counterclockwise under the bias of spring 209. However, when the latch 213 swings clockwise from its latching position, pin 221 moves to the right clear of arm 223 to allow the lockout lever 27 to swing counterclockwise under the bias of spring 209. The arm 223 has a notch 224 for receiving the pin 221.

Referring to FIGS. 3, 4, 15 and 16, there is shown a bushing 225 which fits on hub 167 of ratchet member 165. This bushing has a flange 227 at its rearward end.

The flange 227 has a notch 229 receiving the finger 187 for keying the bushing 225 to the ratchet member 165 so that the bushing rotates with the ratchet member. The front face of flange 227 has markings spaced at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the ratchet teeth and representing prices from five cents to sixty cents in five cent increments (see FIG. 16). On the forward face of the flange surrounding the bushing are crown coupling teeth 231. The stops S1, S2 and S3 fit ro tatably on the bushing. The stops are identical, each comprising a disk having crown coupling teeth 233 on both faces thereof, and having a lobe 235 extending for about of are around the periphery of the disk. The trailing ends of the lobes 235 of stops S1, S2 and S3 are respectively designated 81A, 82A and 83A. Stop S1 is the rear stop of the three, stop S2 is the middle stop, and stop S3 is the front stop. The stops are biased axially rearward on the bushing 225 by a spring 237. With the crown coupling teeth of stop S2 in mesh with the teeth on stops S1 and S3 and with the teeth on stop S1 in mesh with the crown coupling teeth 231 on the flange 227, and with finger 187 of ratchet member in the notch 229 of flange 227, all three stops are locked to the ratchet member 165 for rotation therewith. The stops are independently rotatably adjustable on the bushing 225 by moving them outwardly on the bushing against the bias of the spring 237 to disengage the teeth, and then rotating them to a desired angular position. The stops S1, S2 and S3 have projections such as indicated at 239 which serve as pointers in conjunction with the markings on flange 227 for facilitating the adjustment of the stops.

Coins drop out of the chutes NC, DC and QC into a hopper indicated at 241 in the lower part of the apparatus (see FIG. 3). This hopper is defined by plates 1 and 7 and left and right lower pivoted gates 243 and 245. The gates have a common pivot at 247. A spring-biased bar 249 (see FIG. 1) vertically slidable on the outside of the front cover plate 7 has a stud 251 reaching through a slot 253 in the plate'7 under the right-hand gate 245 for holding this gate in an upper closed position. The spring for biasing the bar 249 upward is designated 255,

A spring-biased bar 257 (see FIG. 2) vertically slidable on the outside of the plate 1 has a finger 259 reaching through a slot 261 in the plate 1 under the left-hand gate 243 for holding this gate in an upper closed position. Springs for biasing the bar 257 upward are designated 263. The arrangement is such that upon downward movement of the bar 249 against the bias of the spring 255, the stud 251 is lowered from under the right-hand gate 245, and this gate swings down under its own weight to spill out any coins in the hopper into a chute 265 which leads to a money box. Upon downward movement of the bar 257 against the bias of the springs 263, the finger 259 is lowered from under the left-hand gate 243, and this gate swings open to spill any coins in the hopper into a chute 267 for return to a customer.

Pivoted at 269 on the outside of the plate 7 is a lever 271 (see FIG. 1). This lever is biased upward to the raised retracted position illustrated in FIG. 1 by a spring 273. It carries a cam follower roller 275 engageable by a cam edge 277 on the cam 79 for swinging it downward against the bias of the spring 273 upon clockwise rotation of the cam 79 from its retracted position. Upon such swinging down of the lever 271, its lower edge engages a roller 279 on the bar 249 and moves this bar downward to release the right-hand gate.

A lockout lever 281 for the left-hand gate 243 is pivoted at 283 on the outside of the plate 7. A pin 285 extends from this lever 281 through a slot 287 in the plate 7. The lever 281 has a heavy stud 289 engageable by the lever 271 for holding lever 281 in the retracted position shown in FIG. 1. In the stated retracted position of the lockout lever 281, the pin 285 registers with a notch 291 in the left-hand gate. When the lever 271 swings down away from the stud 289, the lockout lever 281 moves under the bias of the weight of the stud 289 to a position in which the pin 285 blocks the left-hand gate 243 from moving downward even though the bar 257 is moved downward.

Means is provided for damping or braking the trip wire 17 on its upward (return) swing to slow down its movement and the movement of the pawl-carrying disk 145 to preclude overrunning or overriding of the ratchet member 165, bushing 225 and stops S1S3 which are keyed to the ratchet member. As shown in FIG. 3, this damping means comprises a damping wire 293 pivoted as indicated at 295 on plate 1 hanging down from the pivot in position for brushing against the trip wire 17 and having a weight 297 at its lower end. The arrangement is such that as the trip wire 17 swings upward, it brushes against the wire 293, thereby retarding its movement to prevent override of the ratchet member 165, bushing 225 and stops S1S3.

Mechanism for actuating the reset lever 25 is shown to comprise a lever 299 (see FIG. 3) pivoted at 301 on the inside of plate 1 having a nose 303 at its lower end engageable with the upper end of the reset lever 25. Lever 299 carries a follower roller 305 engageable by a cam edge 307 on a slide 309 upon upward movement of the latter from the lowered retracted position in which it is shown in FIG. 3. The slide 309 has elongate slots 311 receiving upper and lower studs 313 and 315 on plate 1. The slide has a pin 317 at its lower end received in a notch 319 in a lever 321 pivoted at 323 on the plate 1. Lever 321 carries a follower roller 325 which extends through a slot 327 in cover plate 7 and which is received in cam slot 83 in cam 79 (see FIG. 1). Slot 83 has a cam edge portion 329 engageable with the roller 325 to swing the lever 321 upward and drive the slide 309 upward upon clockwise rotation of cam 79 from its FIG. 1 retracted position. Slide 309 and lever 321 are biased downward by a spring 331 connected to the slide. A bell crank lever 333 is pivoted on the lower stud 315 underneath the slide 309. The bell crank lever 333 has an upwardly extending arm 335 carrying a pin 337 at its upper end engageable by a finger 339 extending from the lower end of lever 299 over the pin 337. The bell crank lever 333 has a generally horizontally extending arm 341 carrying a pin 343 at its free end downwardly engageable with extensions 345 of feelers F1F3.

Operation is as follows:

As herein illustrated, and by way of example, the apparatus may be set up for vending twenty-five cent, thirty cent and thirty-five cent items. This is accomplished by setting the stops S1S3 in such angular positions relative to one another and to the bushing 225 that, with the ratchet member 165 in its zero position, it takes five steps of the ratchet member to rotate the assembly of stops to a position where the trailing end 81A of stop S1 clears the upper end of the finger 51 of feeler F1, six steps of the ratchet member to rotate the assembly to a position where the trailing end 82A of stop S2 clears the upper end of the finger 53 of feeler F2, and seven steps of the ratchet member to rotate the assembly to a position where the trailing end S3A of stop S3 clears the upper end of finger 55 of feeler F3.

A nickel N deposited in the coin slot of the vending machine passes through the coin selector (not shown) which delivers it into the upper end of the nickel chute NC. The nickel, falling in the nickel chute, engages the finger 21 at the free end of the trip wire 17, and drives the wire 17 downward against the bias of the spring 151 of the totalizer 15 through the arc 93N. Upon the downward swing of the wire, the disk rotates in clockwise direction as viewed from the front of the apparatus and the driving pawl 159 clicks over one ratchet tooth 163 without rotating the ratchet member 165 and the stops S1-S3 coupled to the ratchet member. The ratchet member 165 is held against rotating in reverse direction (which is clockwise as viewed in FIG. 10) by engagement of finger 187 with shoulder 205 of intermediate plate 105. When the wire has swung down through the arc 93N, the nickel n'des ofl? the finger 21 and exits from the nickel chute, falling into the hopper 241. The wire 17 swings back upward under the bias of the spring 151. Upon the upward or return swing of the wire through the arc 93N, the ratchet member 165 and the assembly of stops S1S3 are indexed forward (rotated counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 3) through a one-tooth interval, and held in the advanced position against the bias of the ratchet return spring 177 by the pawls 159 and 191. The ratchet member 165 and stops S1-S3 are prevented from overriding (i.e., prevented from rotating more than a one-tooth interval) by the damping wire 293. The deposit of additional nickels results in rotating the ratchet member 165 and stops S1-S3 one more step for each nickel. For example, if seven nickels are inserted in succession, the ratchet member and stops will be rotated seven steps.

A dime D deposited in the coin slot of the vending machine passes through the coin selector which delivers it into the upper end of the dime chute DC. The passage of the dime through the dime chute etfects advance of the ratchet member 165 and the stops S1S3 in substantially the same manner as a nickel, except that they are indexed forward two steps instead of one, as in the case of a nickel. This is because the dime drives the trip wire 17 downward through the arc 93D which is approximately twice the are through which the wire is driven downward by a nickel.

A quarter Q deposited in the coin slot of the vending machine passes through the coin selector which delivers it into the upper end of the coin chute QC. The passage of the quarter through the quarter chute results in advance of the ratchet member 165 and the stops S1S3 in substantially the same manner as a nickel or a dime, except that they are indexed forward five steps instead of one, as in the case of a nickel, or two, as in the case of a dime. This is because the quarter drives the trip wire 17 downward through the arc 93Q which is approximately five times as long as the arc 93N.

Assuming that a purchaser has deposited twenty-five cents in coin (either as a quarter, two dimes and a nickel, a dime and three nickels or five nickels), the ratchet member 165 and the stops S1-S3 will be indexed five steps from the zero position shown in FIG. 3 to a twentyfive cent position and latched in the five-step advanced position by the pawls. This brings the stops S1-S3 to a position where the trailing end 81A of the lobe 237 on stop S1 is clear of the upper end of the finger 51 of feeler F1. The five-step rotation, however, is not sufficient to bring the trailing ends 82A and S3A of stops S2 and S3 to a position clear of the upper ends of the fingers 53 and 55 of feelers F2 and F3. Now, having deposited twenty-five cents, the purchaser pulls out a twenty-five cent rod of the vending machine in the manner described in application Serial No. 589,918, resulting in clockwise rotation of the shaft 77 and the cam 79. During the initial portion of the clockwise swing of the cam 79, its cam edge 8-1 acts on roller 65 to swing the lever 57 clockwise from its retracted position shown in FIG. 3. As the lever 57 swings clockwise it acts through the springs 67, 69 and 71 to bias the feeler levers F1, F2, F3 to swing in clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3. Feeler levers F2 and F3, however, are blocked against swinging more than a small amount by stops S2 and S3 since the trailing ends 82A and S3A of the lobes of these two stops are not clear of feeler fingers 53 and 55, and springs 69 and 71 simply yield to permit lever 57 to swing through its full stroke. However, feeler F1 can swing freely in clockwise direction since the trailing end 81A of the lobe of stop S1 is clear of the upper end of feeler finger 51. Accordingly, the feeler lever F1 is swung clockwise through such an angle as to operate the release lever R1. Thereupon, the twenty-five cent rod of the vending machine may be completely pulled out and then returned to its retracted position to dispense a twentyfive cent item.

As the cam 79 continues through its clockwise swing, cam edge 329 thereof acts on roller 325 to swing the lever 321 upward and drive the slide 309 upward. As the slide 309 moves upward, cam edge 307 thereon engages the follower roller 305' on lever 299 and swings lever 299 clockwise from its retracted FIG. 3 position. In the meantime, bell crank lever 333 has been rocked clockwise by the action of extension 345 of feeler F1 on the pin 343 to the point where pin 337 is adjacent finger 339 of lever 299. When the lever 2'99 swings clockwise, its nose 303 acts on the upper end of the reset lever 25 to swing the reset lever 25 counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 11. Pin 203 on lever 25 thereupon releases the holding pawl 191 from the holding teeth 173 and tail 201 of lever 25 releases the driving pawl 159 from the driving teeth 165. The ratchet member 165 and stops S1-S3 are thus released for return to zero position under the bias of spring 177, but are temporarily held against such return by engagement of the trailing end 51A of the lobe of stop S1 with the finger 51' of feeler F1 (which is raised). Also, as lever 299 swings clockwise, finger 339 on lever 299 engages pin 337 and rocks the bell crank lever 333 back counterclockwise, with the result that pin 343 drives feeler F1 back counterclockwise to retract finger 51 of feeler F1 downward from behind the trailing end SIA of the lobe of stop S1. This releases the stops S1-S3 and ratchet member 165 for return to the Zero position. It will be observed that toward the end of the clockwise swing of cam 79, its cam edge 81 rides ofi and away from follower roller 65', thereby releasing lever 57'.

The lockout lever 27 is normally held in its FIG. 10 inactive position in which its lower end is clear of the feeler fingers 51, 53, 55 by the engagement of the pm 221 on latch 213 over the upper arm 223 of the lockout lever 27. When the reset lever 25 swings counterclockwise on its pivot 195 due to the upward resetting movement of the slide 309, pin 211 on the reset lever 25 swings down into engagement with arm2 12'on the lock out lever 27 and swings the lockout lever 27 clockwise to some extent from its inactive position of FIG. 10; As a result, the upper arm 223 of the lookout lever swings down away from thepin 221 on latch 213 a'nd'the latch is released for swinging clockwise as viewed in FIG. 10 on its pivot 215 under the bias of the weight 217 on the latch. The arrangement is such that this release of the latch occurs just after the release of the ratchet member and stops S1 S3. Assuming that upon release, the ratchet member 165 and stops S1S3 immediately return to zero position under the bias of the sprihg 177, the finger 187 on the ratchet member 165 engages the tail 219 of the latch 213 before the latch has had time to swing clockwise away from its retracted position of FIG. 10, and the'latch is thereby held in its latching position to maintain the lockout lever 27 in its inactive position. Then, upon return of the cam 79 to its initial position, all parts are restored to their initial position. If, however, the ratchet member 165 and stops SL183 should not return or be delayed in returning to zero position, the latch 213 swings clockwise away from its latching position of FIG. 10 to a position in which pin 221 on the latch is clear of the upper arm 223 of the lockout lever 27. Then when the reset lever 25 returns to its retracted position upon downward movement of slide 309, the lockout lever 27 swings counterclockwise on its pivot 207 into an active lockout position wherein its lower end lies above the upper ends of-feeler fingers '51, 53, 55 to lock the feelers F1, F2, F3 out of operation. This prevents further operation of the machine until the ratchet member 165 and stops S1'S3 are returned to the Zero position. Sometimes it is possible to release the ratchet member 165 for return by actuating the usual coin return bar of the vending machine, which actuates the reset lever 25, and then when the ratchet member 165 returns to zero position the latch 213 relatches the lockout lever 27 in its inactive position. Otherwise, it is necessary to service the machine.

Also, upon the above-noted clockwise rotation of the cam 79, the cam edge 277 on the cam acts to swing down the lever 271, thereby releasing the right-hand hopper gate 245. Any coin or coins in the hopper are thereby spilled out into the chute 265 and passed to the money box. Upon the downward swing of the lever 271, the lockout lever 281 is released for movement to the position in which the pin 285 blocks the left-hand hopper gate to prevent any possibility of return of a coin or coins. When the cam 79 returns counterclockwise to its retracted position shown in FIG. 1, lever 271 is released for return to its retracted position under the bias of the spring 273. On return of the lever 271 to retracted position, the lockout lever 281 is returned to retracted position and the right-hand hopper gate 245 closes.

If less than twenty-five cents in coin should be deposited, the stops 81-83 are rotated through less than the five steps necessary to bring the trailing end 81A of the lobe of stop S1 to a position clear of the upper end of the finger 51 of feeler F1. Accordingly, feeler F1 is locked against sufficient movement to operate release lever R1.

Assuming that a purchaser has deposited thirty cents in coin (either as a quarter and a nickel, three dimes, two dimes and two nickels, one dime and four nickels, or six nickels), the stops S1--S3 will be rotated six steps from the zero position to a position wherein the trailing ends 81A and 82A of the lobes of stops S1 and S2 are clear of the upper ends of the fingers 51 and 53 of feelers F1 and F2. This six-step rotation, however, is not sufficient to bring trailing end S3A of the lobe of stop S3 clear of the upper end of the finger 55 of feeler F3. It is necessary to operate release levers R1 and R2 to obtain a thirty cent item. When the purchaser, having deposited thirty cents, pulls out a thirty cent rod of the vending machine, the action is similar to that above described except that now feelers F1 and F2 are free to swing in counterclockwise direction for operating release levers R1 and R2. However, feeler F3 is blocked against swinging more than a small amount by the stop S3, and spring 71 simply yields to permit lever 57 to travel through its full stroke.

Assuming that a purchaser has deposited thirty-five cents in coin (either as a quarter and a dime, a quarter and two nickels, three dimes and a nickel, two dimes and three nickels, one dime and five nickels, or seven nickels) the stops S1S3 will be rotated seven steps from the zero position to a position wherein the trailing ends 81A, 52A and 82A of all three stops are clear of the upper ends of the fingers 51, 53, 55 of feelers F1, F2, F3. When the purchaser, having deposited thirty-five cents, pulls out a thirty-five cent rod of the vending machine, the action is similar to that above described except that now all three feelers are free to swing in counterclockwise direction for operating all three release levers R1, R2, R3.

Conversion of the appartus to different three-price setups is readily accomplished by changing the position of the stops S1S3 relative to the bushing 225 and/or relative to one another.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In a coin apparatus comprising an indexing member movable away from a retracted position and biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said indexing member in amounts proportional to coin values, means for holding the indexing member in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the indexing member for return under the bias to its retracted position; means for locking said apparatus out of operation if said indexing member should fail to return to retracted position upon operation of said release means comprising a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active lockout position, and means for effecting movement of said lockout member to its active lockout position in response to operation of said release means without return of said indexing member to its retracted position while maintaining said lockout member in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return of said indexing member to retracted position.

2. In a coin apparatus comprising an indexing member movable away from a retracted position and biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said indexing member in amounts proportional to coin values, means for holding the indexing member in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the indexing member for return under the bias to its retracted position; means for locking said apparatus out of operation if said indexing member should fail to return to retracted position upon operation of said release means comprising a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active lockout position, and means controlled by said release means and by said indexing member for efiecting movement of said lockout member to its active lockout position in response to operation of said release means without return of said indexing member to its retracted position while maintaining said lockout member in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return of said indexing member to retracted position.

3. In a coin apparatus comprising an indexing member movable away from a retracted position and biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said indexing member in amounts proportional to coin values, means for holding the indexing member in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the indexing member for return under the bias to its retracted position; means for locking said apparatus out of operation if said indexing member should fail to return to retracted position upon operation of said release means comprising a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active lockout position, a latch for latching said lockout member in its inactive position, a control for the latch movable with said indexing member adapted when said indexing member is in its retracted position to hold the latch in latching position, said release means including means for effecting release of said latch to release said lockout member for movement to its active lockout position if said indexing member fails to return to its retracted position, said latch control being adapted to maintain the latch in latching position by the return of the indexing member to its retracted position.

4. In a coin apparatus as set forth in claim 3, said latch being biased to move out of its latching position, and the return bias on said indexing member being such as to return the indexing member to its retracted position before the latch has had time to move out of its latching position upon actuation of said release means.

5. In a coin apparatus comprising an indexing member movable away from a retracted position and biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said indexing member in amounts proportional to coin values, means for holding the indexing member in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the indexing member for return under the bias to its retracted position; a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position, a latch for latching said lockout member in its inactive position, a control for the latch movable with said indexing member adapted when said indexing member is in its retracted position to hold the latch in latching position, said release means including means for etfecting release of said latch to release said lockout member for movement to its active position if said indexing member fails to return to its retracted position, said latch control being adapted to maintain the latch in latching position by the return of the indexing member to its retracted position, said latch being biased to move out of its latching position, and the return bias on said indexing member being such as to return the indexing member to its retracted position before the latch has had time to move out of its latching position upon actuation of said release means, said latch being a pivoted latch gravity-biased to swing out of its latching position slowly in relation to the re turn movement of the indexing member.

6. In a coin apparatus comprising a feeler normally occupying a retracted position and movable away from retracted position, an indexing stop movable away from a retracted position in which it is engageable by the feeler to limit movement of the feeler to a position in which it allows a full stroke of the feeler, said stop being biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said stop in amounts proportional to coin values, means for holding the stop in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the stop for return under the bias to its retracted position; a feeler lockout normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position for limiting the movement of the feeler, and means for effecting 13 I movement of said feeler lockout to its active position in response to operation of said releasemeanswithout return of said stop to its retractedpositionwhilemain taining said feeler lockout in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return of said stop to retracted position.

7. In a coin apparatus comprising a feeler normally occupying a retracted position and movable away from retracted position, an indexing stop movable away from a retracted position in which it is engageable by the feeler to limit movement of the feeler to a position in which it allows a full stroke of the feeler, s'aid stop being biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said stop in amounts proportional to 'coin values, means for holding the stop in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the stop for return under said bias to its retracted position; a feeler lockout normally occupying an inactive'posit-ion and movable therefrom to an active position for limiting the movement of the feeler, and means controlled by said release means and by said stop for effecting movement of said feeler lockout to its active position in response to operation of said release means without return of said stop to its retracted position while maintaining said feeler lockout in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return of said stop to retracted position.

8. In a coin apparatus comprising a feeler normally occupying a retracted position and movable away from retracted position, an indexing stop movable away from a retracted position in which it is engageable by the feeler to limit movement of the feeler to a position in which it allows a full stroke of the feeler, said stop being biased to return to retracted position, coin-actuated means for advancing said stop in amounts proportionalto coin values, means for holding the stop in advanced position against the return bias, and means for releasing the stop for return under the bias to its retracted position; a feel er lockout normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position, a latch for latching said feeler lockout in its inactive position, a control for the latch movable with said stop adapted when said stop is in its retracted position to hold the latch in latching position, said release means including means for effecting release of said latchto release said feeler lookout for movement to its active position if said stop fails to return to its retracted position, said latch control being adapted to maintain the latch in latching position by the return of the stop to its retracted position.

9. In a coin apparatus as set forth in claim 8, said latch being biased to move out of its latching position and the return bias on said stop being such as to return the stop to its retracted position before the latch has had time to move out of its latching position upon actuation of said release means.

10. In a coin apparatus as set forth in claim 9, said latch being a pivoted latch gravity-biased to swing out of its latching position slowly in relation to the return movement of the stop.

11. In a coin apparatus comprising a rotatable indexing member rotatable in a forward direction away from a zero position and biased to rotate in return direction back to zero position, coin-actuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for rotating said indexing member in forward direction in amounts proportional to coin value, a holding pawl for said ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return rotation of the indexing member under the bias from an advanced position back to zero position; means for locking said apparatus out of operation if said indexing member should fail to return to retracted position upon operation of said release means comprising a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active lockout position, and means for effecting movement of said lockout member to its active lockout position in're'sponse to operation of said release means without'return r ota tion of said indexing member back to zero position while maintaining said lockout member in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return rotation of said indexing member back to zero position.

12. In a coin apparatus comprising a rotatable indexing member rotatable in a forward direction away from a zero position and biased to rotate in return direction back to Zero position, coin-actuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for rotating said indexing member in forward direction in amounts proportional to coin value, a holding pawl for said ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return rotation of the indexing member under the bias from an advanced position back to Zero position; means for locking said apparatus out of operation if said indexing member should fail to return to retracted position upon operation of said release means comprising a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active lockout position, and means controlled by said release means and by said indexing member for effecting movement of said lockout member to its active lockout position in response to operation of said release means without return rotation of said indexing member back to zero position while maintaining said lockout member in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return rotation of said indexing member back to zero position.

13. In a coin apparatus comprising a rotatable indexing member rotatable in a forward direction away from a Zero position and biased to return to Zero position, coinactuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for rotating said indexing member forward in amounts proportional to coin values, a holding pawl for the ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return of the indexing member under the bias from an advanced position to zero position; means for locking said apparatus out of operation if said indexing member should fail to return to retracted position upon operation of said release means comprising a lookout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to ,an active lockout position, a latch fof latching said lockout membet in its inactive position, a control for the latch rotatable with said indexing member adapted when said indexing member is in its zero position to hold the latch in latching position, said release means including means for effecting release of said latch torelea'se said lockout member for movement to its active lockout position if said indexing member fails to rotate back to its zero position, said latch control being adapted to maintain the latch in latching position by the return of the indexing member to its zero position.

14. In a coin apparatus as set forth in claim 13, said latch being biased to move out of its latching position and the return bias on said indexing member being such as to rotate the indexing member back to its zero position before the latch has had time to move out of its latching position upon actuation of said release means.

15. In a coin apparatus comprising a rotatable indexing member rotatable in a forward direction away from a zero position and biased to return to zero position, coin-actuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for ro tating said indexing member forward in amounts proportional to coin values, a holding pawl for the ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return of the indexing member under the bias from an advanced position to zero position; a lockout member normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position, a latch for latching said lockout member in its inactive position, a control for the latch rotatable with said indexing member adapted when said indexing member is in its zero position to hold the latch in latching position, said release means including means for effecting release of said latch to release said lockout member for movement to its active position if said indexing member fails to rotate back to its zero position, said latch control being adapted to maintain the latch in latching position by the return of the indexing member to its zero position, said latch being biased to move out of its latching position and the return bias on said indexing member being such as to rotate the indexing member back to its zero position before the latch has had time to move out of its latching position upon actuation of said release means, said latch being a pivoted latch gravity-biased to swing out of its latching position slowly in relation to the return rotation of the indexing member.

16. In a coin apparatus comprising a feeler normally occupying a retracted position and movable away from retracted position, a rotatable indexing stop rotatable in a forward direction away from a zero position in which it is engageable by the feeler to limit movement of the feeler to a position in which it allows a full stroke of the feeler, said stop being biased to rotate in return direction back to zero position, coin-actuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for rotating said stop in forward direction in amounts proportional to coin values, a hold ing pawl for said ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return rotation of said stop under the bias from an advanced position back to zero position; a feeler lockout normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position for limiting the movement of the feeler, and means for effecting movement of said feeler lockout to its active position in response to operation of said release means without return rotation of said stop back to zero position while maintaining said feeler lockout in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return rotation of said stop back to zero position.

17. In a coin apparatus comprising a feeler normally occupying a retracted position and movable away from retracted position, a rotatable indexing stop rotatable in a forward direction away from a zero position in which it is engageable by the feeler to limit movement of the feeler to a position in which it allows a full stroke of the feeler, said stop being biased to rotate in return direction back to zero position, coin-actuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for rotating said stop in forward direction in amounts proportional to coin values, a holding pawl for said ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return rotation of said stop under the bias from an advanced position back to zero position; a feeler lockout normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position for limiting the movement of the feeler, and means controlled by said release means and by said stop for effecting movement of said feeler lockout to its active position in response to operation of said release means without return rotation of said stop back to zero position while maintaining said feeler lockout in its inactive position in response to operation of said release means and return rotation of said stop back to zero position.

18. In a coin apparatus comprising a feeler normally occupying a retracted position and movable away from retracted position, a rotatable indexing stop rotatable in a forward direction away from a zero position in which it is engageable by the feeler to limit movement of the feeler to a position in which it allows a full stroke of the feeler, said stop being biased to rotate in return direction back to zero position, coin-actuated means including a driving pawl and ratchet for rotating said stop in forward direction in amounts proportional to coin values, a holding pawl for said ratchet, and means for releasing the pawls for return rotation of said stop under the bias from an advanced position back to zero position; a feeler lockout normally occupying an inactive position and movable therefrom to an active position, a latch for latching said feeler lockout in its inactive position, a control for the latch rotatable with said stop adapted when said stop is in its zero position to hold the latch in latching position, said release means including means for effecting release of said latch to release said feeler lockout for movement to its active position if said stop fails to rotate back to its zero position, said latch control being adapted to maintain the latch in latching position by the return of the stop to its zero position.

19. In a coin apparatus as set forth in claim 18, said latch being biased to move out of its latching position and the return bias on said stop being such as to rotate the stop back to its zero position before the latch has had time to move out of its latching position upon actuation of said release means.

20. In a coin apparatus as set forth in claim 19, said latch being a pivoted latch gravity-biased to swing out of its latching position slowly in relation to the return rotation of the stop.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3126082 *Mar 26, 1962Mar 24, 1964 maxwell
US3155213 *Oct 26, 1961Nov 3, 1964Nat Rejectors GmbhMoney-handling devices
US3186532 *Jun 7, 1962Jun 1, 1965Nat Rejectors GmbhMoney-handling devices
US4036347 *Apr 15, 1976Jul 19, 1977Umc Industries, Inc.Coin totalizer for different denominations
US4201283 *May 31, 1978May 6, 1980E. B. Metal Rubber Industries, Inc.Pilferage protection for satellite vending machine having dual pricing capability
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Classifications
U.S. Classification194/226
International ClassificationG07F5/20
Cooperative ClassificationG07F5/20
European ClassificationG07F5/20