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Publication numberUS2993214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1961
Filing dateMar 10, 1958
Priority dateMar 10, 1958
Publication numberUS 2993214 A, US 2993214A, US-A-2993214, US2993214 A, US2993214A
InventorsFranco Anthony
Original AssigneeFranco Anthony
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Solution-injecting device
US 2993214 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 25, 1961 A. FRANCO 2,993,214

SOLUTION-INJECTING DEVICE Filed March 10, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 4/ o 5 -23 1| H fi 17 1| w: )6 l g 9 4 A /2 Hnthom Franco BY "M04" AITORNEYS July 25, 1961 FRANCO 2,993,214

SOLUTION-INJECTING DEVICE Filed March 10, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Finthonq Franco BY @ZMAWMA ATTORNEY Filed March 10. 1958 ly 25, 1961 A. FRANCO 2,993,214

SOLUTION-INJECTING DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN 1 OR Hnfhonq Franco ATTORNEYb United States Patent 2,993,214 'SOLUTION-INJECTING DEVICE Anthony Franco, 10 Hedge St., New Haven, Conn. Filed Mar. 10, 1958, Ser. No. 720,277 1 Claim. (Cl. 4228) This invention relates to a device for automatically injecting solutions into toilet and urinal bowls, and relates more particularly to a device designed for support within a conventional toilet or urinal and which dispenses automatically, on each flushing of the bowl, an amount of a concentrated and aerated solution, such as a cleanser, disinfectant and deodorizing agent.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved device for automatically injecting solutions into toilet bowls or the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device such as characterized above, which dispenses an aerated solution of cleanser, disinfectant and deodorizing agents.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of the character set forth, which is simple in construction, inexpensive to manufacture, and yet effective and efficient in use.

Further objects of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of three forms of the device.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a broken fragmentary view illustrating in vertical section a water tank of a toilet, showing the operating parts of the toilet and my improved solutioninjecting device;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view illustrating my solution-injecting device in vertical section;

FIG. 3 is a view partially in section taken on line v33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view on line 55 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 2, illustrating a modified form of my device; and w FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6, but illustrating a further modification of the device, adapted for use with a urinal. 1

In the form shown in FIGS. 1 through 5, the water tank is indicated at 10 and is provided at the bottom thereof with an outlet fitting 11 through which water is discharged into a toilet bowl, not shown, in the usual manner. The outlet 11 is provided with an opening 12 communicating with the-tank and controlled by a conventional valve 13 operated by the usual manually operable handle member, not shown.

A water-inlet conduit ,14 is connected to a source of water under pressure, not shown; The inlet conduit 14 isprovided with the usual float-operated valve 15 to control the admission of water from the inlet 14 into the inlet conduits 16 and 17. The conduit 17 opens into the tank .10 and serves to fill the same. As shown in FIG. 1, the conduit 16 extends into a further inletcondu'it 18'which is tapped into the outlet fitting 11 and forms a 'by-pass aroundthe valve 13. For the purposes of this description it is significant that the conduits 14, 16 and 18, together with the outlet fitting 11, provide, in effect, conduit-forming means communicating with a source of water. under pressure, for communication with a bowl which is to be flushed at intervals. It will be understood that when the valve 13- is opened water in the tank 10 is drained into the bowl. When and as the water is drained into the bowl, the'float-operated valve 15 is opened and water from the pressure source is disis discharged into the tank through the conduit 17. When the valve 13 is allowed to drop and close the opening 12, the tank begins to fill and continues to fill until the float-operated valve 15 is closed to thereby cut off the supply of water to the conduit 16 as well as the conduit 17.

In the form shown in FIGS. 1 through 5, the solutioninjecting device is indicated generally at 20 and includes a fluid container or reservoir 21 supported from a wall of the tank as by a strap 22 having a hook-like part extending over the wall. The reservoir 21, which may be of hollow cylindrical form, open at the top and closed at the bottom, has an open-ended well-forming tube 23 disposed therein in eccentric relation. The tube 23, which is of considerably smaller diameter than the diameter of the reservoir 21, is secured to the cylindrical wall of the reservoir, as by welding. The tube 23 has the bottom thereof spaced upwardly a distance from the bottom of the reservoir, as shown in FIG. 2. Above the tube or well 23 the reservoir is apertured to receive laterally extending pipes 24 and 25 preferably formed of flexible material. The pipe 24 has at one end thereof a needle-valve assembly 26 extending over the well 23 to discharge the contents of the pipe 24 therein, the other end of the pipe 24 being tapped into the conduit 16. The arrangement is such that when water flows in the conduit 16, water from the last-mentioned conduit enters the conduit 24 and, by proper adjustment of the needle valve, drips very slowly into the well 23. The pipe 25 is provided at. one end with a connection 27 communicating with a pipe member 28 extending downwardly into the well 23.

The pipe member 28 comprises an upper portion 29 having at its upper extremity a needle valve 30 for controlling the admission of air from the tank 10 into the upper part of the pipe member 28. As shown in FIG. 2, the connection 27 of the pipe 25 is located at the upper part of the pipe member 28 and is disposed below and closely adjacent the needle valve 30. The end of the pipe 25 remote from the connection 27 is connected to a curved tube 32 through the wall structure of the conduit 16 below the pipe 24, as shown in FIG. 2. As shown in the last-mentioned view, the tube 32 is curved to follow the direction of the flow in the conduit 16 and the lower portion of the tube 32, which is of substantially smaller diameter than the conduit 16, is arranged in the latter in substantially concentric relation. The tube 32 is, in effect, an aspirator or suction tube and serves to suck solution from the reservoir 21 when Water flows in the conduit 16.

Though not critical, it has been found desirable to employ a nipple (see FIG. 2) on the free end of the conduit 16 to adjustably restrict the same so that the rate of flow from the conduit 16 may be varied. The nipple, indicated at 33, may be employed to reduce the rate at which water flows past the suction tube 32. It will be understood that the amount of fluid which is injected into the conduit 16 through the suction tube 32 varies in accordance with the rate at which water flows past the lower end of the suction tube. The nipple 33 may have an elastic body 34, formed of rubber or the like, stretched over the open end of the conduit 16. The body 34 is of tubular shape and below the last-mentioned end of the conduit 16, forms a restriction, as at 35. In this area, the

. elastic material of the body tightly embraces a V-shaped member 36, best shown in FIG. 5, formed of sheet metal.

while, at the same time, water from the pressure source The member 36 may be deformed by finger pressure on the body to eifect a larger or smaller opening in this area.

Turning once again to the details of the construction of vthe pipe member 28, it will be observed that the lower part of the member 28 is formed by a pipe portion 37, as

- 3 shown in FIG. 2. A short tube 38 extends into the upper end of the portion 37 and also extends into the lower end of the pipe portion 29. The tube 38 serves to restrict a portion of the vertical passage in the pipe member 28 and may have a press fit with the pipe port-ions 29 and 37. The restriction formed by the tube 38 in the vertical passage of the pipe member 28 provides a seat for a valve like baffle member 39 of pin term. The member 39 is provided with a tapered head 39 for creating a turbulence in the upper part of the pipe member 28 as solution is sucked from the reservoir 21. The operative position of the bafile member 39 is shown in full lines in FIG. 2, while the inoperative position is shown in FIG. 2 in broken lines. In the last-mentioned position of the member 39, the head 39 of the member 39 rests by gravity on the seat provided by the tube 38. The bafile member is moved from the inoperative position to the operative position by suction.

Below the tube 38 the cylindrical side-wall structure of the pipe portion 37 is provided with a series of vertically spaced openings 40 through which solution from the reservoir 21 is sucked into the pipe portion 37. The openings 40 are vertically spaced so that solution from different levels in the reservoir may enter the pipe portion 37. The use of a series of apertures is particularly advantageous where the ingredients of the solution which is being usedtend to separate from one another and form layers in the reservoir. Fluids from several different layers in the reservoir may simultaneously enter the pipe member 28 and be mixed therein owing to the provision of the vertically spaced apertures in the pipe portion 37. The lower end of the pipe portion 37 is plugged, as at 42.

From the foregoing it will be understood that when solution from the reservoir is sucked into the pipe member 28 by the action of the suction tube 32, the solution passes upwardly in the member 28 and a turbulence or atomization is effected in the upper portion of the member 28 adjacent the outlet 27. The turbulence is effected coincidentally with the flow of air to the upper region of the pipe member 28 around the needle valve 30. The how of air is effected by the suction in the tube 23. Thus the solution from the reservoir 21 is well aerated when it enters the flow of water in the conduit 16. It is then carried by this stream and ultimately projected with some force into the bowl Where it first spreads out in the bottom of the latter and then bubbles up through the water in the bowl to thereby release to the atmosphere around the bowl the deodorant of the solution. It will be understood that by aerating the solution containing the deodorant prior to the injection of the solution into the bowl, the effectiveness of the deodorant is increased considerably. The aerated solution also tends to spread more quickly through the water in the bowl.

The pipe 24, which is connected to the inlet conduit 16 and which discharges into the reservoir 21 through the needlevalve assembly '26,'s'er'v'es to dilute the solution in the reservoir. By pouring a very concentrated solution into the reservoir 21, and by diluting the solution with water from the pipe 24 on each flushing, the necessity of refilling the reservoir at frequent intervals is avoided. In other words, a large volume of solution of sufiicienlt strength may be produced from a small amount of very highly concentrated solution. The well'23 tends to localize the dilution of the solution in the reservoir, the dilution tending'to be localized to the area or vicinity of the pipe member extending downwardly into the reservoir.

The form of the solution-injecting device shown in FIG. 6 is similar in some respects to the form shown in FIGS. 1 through 5 and described above. In the form of FIG. 6, a pipe member, generally indicated at 45, extends into a reservoir "46 containing the solution. The reservoir is fed by an inverted globe or vial 47 and is suitably supported from the tank structure. The "connection-of the pipe member 45 tothe water inlet for the bowl may be the same as that described above in connection with the form shown in FIGS. 1 through 5. The pipe member 45 includes an upper pipe portion 48 and a 'lower pipe portion 49. The pipe portion 48 has at its upper extremity a needle valve 50 similar to the needle valve 30 described above. The lower end of the pipe portion 48 receives and has a press fit with a passage-restricting tube 5 1 which extends loosely into the .U-shaped extension 52 of the reservoir 46. The extension 52 is rigid and is fixed to the reservoir 46 for support by the latter. As illustrated in FIG.-'6, the pipe portion 48 is spaced upwardly a short distance from the extension 52 .and the arrangement is such that air in the tank may enter the extension 52 around the tube 51. The pipe 25, which supports the pipe portion 48, may be supported from the tank structure in any convenient manner. The pipe portion 49 which constitutes the lower end of the pipe member 45 is of much smaller diameter than the lower end of the pipe member 28 described above.

The pipe portion 49, which extends downwardly from the tube 51 to a point below the liquid level in the reservoir extension 52, has a part thereof received within and suitably secured to the lower portion of the tube 51. Above the liquid level in the reservoir extension 52 the pipe portion 49 is provided with an aperture in the sidewall structure thereof, the aperture being indicated at 53. Air which passes into the outer end of the reservoir extension 52 from the tank may pass through the aperture 53 into the pipe portion 49. The liquid level of the solution in the reservoir 46 and its extension is indicated at 54. The neck of the inverted vial 47 extends downwardly to this level and it will be understood that as long as some solution remains in the vial 47, the liquid level 54 remains unchanged. Suitable air spaces are provided between the vial 47 and the reservoir 46 so that the solution in the reservoir 46 is subjected to atmospheric pressure.

In the form of FIG. 6, there is no water inlet discharg ing into the reservoir to dilute the solution therein. Instead a very concentrated solution is employed in the reservoir and only a very small amount of this solution'is injected or sucked into the water inlet system of the toilet on each flushing owing in part to the small diameter of the pipe portion 49. As shown in FIG. 6, the pipe portion 49 is not provided with a series of upwardly spaced openings in the side-wall structure thereof, but is open at the lower end. A baflie member 56 is provided similar to the bafiie member 39 described in connection with the form shown in FIGS. 1 through 5. The passage-restricting'tube 51 provides asset for the member 56.

The operation of the solution-injecting device of FIG. '6 is as follows. When water flows in the inlet conduit 16 during flushing of thetoilet, the aspirator or suction tube sucks solution from the reservoir. The solution passes upwardly in the pipe portion '49 and is mixed with air sucked into the last-mentioned portion through the opening 53. This mixture impinges the bafiie member 56 which is lifted by suction and creates a turbulence in the stream. More air is sucked'from the tank into the stream in the area of the needle valve '50 and the result is that the solution is well aerated when it reaches the conduit 16. As previously indicated, the volume of solution sucked from the reservoir on each flushing of the toilet is considerably smaller than the volume sucked from the reservoir in the form of FIGS. 1 through 5. However, in the form of FIG. 6, the solution is more concentrated and on each flushing of the toilet the solution is mixed with air from the tank to a greater extent.

In the form of FIG. 7, the solution-injecting device is associated with a urinal. The solution-injecting device of FIG. 7 is identical to the solution-injecting device shown in FIG. 6, except for the construction and arrangement of the aspirator or suction tube and the pipe which connects the tube to the pipe member-of the solution-injecting device. In FIG. 7 the suction tube is indicated at 58 and the pipe which connects the tubeto the pipe member of the solution-injecting device is indicated at 59. In the last-mentioned view, the vertical wall structure of the urinal is indicated at 60. A water-inlet pipe 61 extends downwardly along the wall structure and is provided at its lower end with a spray head 62 for spraying water into a urinal bowl, not shown. The water-inlet pipe 61, controlled by the usual manually operable valve, is connected to a suitable source of water under pres sure, and as the water flowing in the pipe 61 tends to remain under some pressure owing to the provision of the spray head 62, an open-ended pipe or conduit 63 extends upwardly through the spray head into the pipe 6 1 in embracing relation to the tube 58 to relieve, to some extent, the pressure of the water and increase the rate of its flow in the area of the discharge end of the suction tube 58.

The conduit 63 is of considerably smaller diameter than the pipe 61 and is arranged eccentrically of the latter, the conduit 63 being welded to the pipe 61 and forming, in eifect, an integral part of the water inlet provided by the pipe 61. The pipe or conduit 63 is the equivalent of the conduit 16 in the form shown in FIGS. 1 through 5. The suction tube 58 passes through the side-wall structure of the conduit 63 and then extends in the direction of the flow in the conduit. The conduit 63, unlike the conduit 16, is not provided with a separate nipple restricting the flow at the discharge end of the conduit but is, itself, restricted at this end. The suction tube passes through the side-wall structure of the pipe 61 and is connected to the pipe 59. The pipe 59 interconnects the suction tube and the pipe member of the solution-injecting device. The pipe 59 passes through the vertical wall structure of the urinal for support by the latter. It will be understood that the pipe member of the solution-injecting device is supported from the pipe 59. The reservoir of the fluid-injecting device may be supported in a conventional manner on any suitable wall.

When the urinal is flushed, Water flows in the pipes 61 and 63 starting the sucking action of the tube 58. The tube 58 sucks solution from the reservoir into the stream in the pipe 63. The solution is aerated in the same manner as in the form of FIG. 6.

In accordance with the foregoing disclosure, there is provided an improved device for automatically injecting solutions into toilet bowls or the like. There is also provided a device which dispenses an aerated solution of cleanser, disinfectant and deodorizing agents. Furthermore, the device is of simple construction and is very effective and efiicient in use.

While three forms of the solution-injecting device have been shown in the drawings and described above, it will be apparent to those versed in the art that the device is susceptible of various modifications and changes in details without departing from the principles of the invention and the scope of the claim.

What I claim is:

In a device for injecting a solution into the flushing water of a toilet or the like having a water-inlet conduit for discharge into a bowl, the combination of a container forming a reservoir for the solution, an open-ended tube in the reservoir arranged vertically and forming a well, said tube being of considerably smaller diameter than the reservoir, a pipe having an inlet end connected to the water-inlet conduit and having an outlet end for discharge into said well to dilute the solution therein, means controlling the discharge from the pipe into the well, a pipe member extending downwardly in the well to a point below the liquid level and having above the latter means for controlling the admission of air to the pipe member, an aspirator tube having an inlet end and having an outlet end extending into the water-inlet conduit for inducing suction when water flows in the last-mentioned conduit, the last-named tube having the inlet end thereof connected to the pipe member to suck a volume of solution and air into the latter where they are mixed prior to injection into the water-inlet conduit through the aspirator tube, the pipe member having the lower end thereof sealed and having a series of vertically spaced fluid-inlet openings below the liquid level in the reservoir, the pipe member being provided with a restriction formed in the passage thereof, the restriction being located above said fluid-inlet openings, and a pin-like baflle element in the pipe member to create a turbulence in the stream therein when the aspirator tube is operative to suck solution from the reservoir, the baffle element having a head cooperating with said restriction in the pipe member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 669,572 B lackmore Mar. 12, 1901 2,091,110 Smallen Aug. 24, 1937 2,322,296 Hunter June 22, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS 8,189 Great Britain July 27, 1895 18,671 Great Britain Dec. 15, 1894 169,878 Great Britain Oct. 13, 1921 359,604 Great Britain Oct. 29,1931

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3105245 *Aug 15, 1962Oct 1, 1963Donald B FinkbinerApparatus for forming and delivering chemicaled solutions to toilet bowls
US3188656 *Apr 2, 1963Jun 15, 1965Drager Wayne AApparatus for the collection and utilization of waste water
US3228040 *May 15, 1961Jan 11, 1966Grover C CurrieAdditive feeding means
US3290698 *Aug 10, 1964Dec 13, 1966Russell J JoynerBathroom deodorizer
US3327325 *Apr 20, 1965Jun 27, 1967Albert J RogerLavatory perfumer
US3327727 *Jun 1, 1964Jun 27, 1967Philco Ford CorpLiquid dispensing system for washing machines
US3357598 *Sep 21, 1965Dec 12, 1967Dole Valve CoAdjustable liquid dispenser
US3398862 *Nov 28, 1966Aug 27, 1968Triplem Company IncLiquid proportioning and mixing system
US3428970 *Jun 28, 1966Feb 25, 1969Jose M BarcitaAutomatic toilet deodorizer
US3890657 *May 16, 1974Jun 24, 1975Roy M GrayChemical dispenser for toilet
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US4229410 *Feb 13, 1978Oct 21, 1980Kosti Carl MBacteriostatic deodorant water coloring toilet element
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US5040246 *Apr 27, 1990Aug 20, 1991Rocco ZaninoCleaning fluid dispensing assembly for use in a flush toilet
US5042095 *Nov 3, 1987Aug 27, 1991Fluidmaster, Inc.Cleaner injector system
US5387249 *May 10, 1993Feb 7, 1995Wiecorek; VincentSelf-contained adjustable chemical injection device
US5778459 *Feb 10, 1997Jul 14, 1998Guerin; Phillip M.Method and apparatus for injecting chemicals into the water of a toilet bowl
US6449779Feb 28, 2001Sep 17, 2002Fluidmaster, Inc.Automatic toilet cleaning dispenser assembly
US6662380Aug 29, 2002Dec 16, 2003S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Dual action toilet rim mounted toilet bowl cleaner
US6854136Aug 6, 2003Feb 15, 2005S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Dual action toilet rim mounted toilet bowl cleaner
US8146180Mar 16, 2009Apr 3, 2012S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Toilet tablet dispenser
US8925119 *May 26, 2010Jan 6, 2015Reckitt Benckiser LlcIn lavatory dispensing devices
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US20090265842 *Apr 24, 2008Oct 29, 2009Gary HigginsToilet deodorizer device
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WO1982001319A1 *Oct 16, 1980Apr 29, 1982Carl M KostiBacteriostatic deodorant water coloring toilet element
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/225.1, 239/318, 4/353, 239/317
International ClassificationE03D9/02
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/037, E03D2009/028
European ClassificationE03D9/03D4