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Publication numberUS2995256 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1961
Filing dateJan 19, 1959
Priority dateJan 19, 1959
Publication numberUS 2995256 A, US 2995256A, US-A-2995256, US2995256 A, US2995256A
InventorsSchoenfisch Henry P
Original AssigneeSchoenfisch Henry P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tool stand
US 2995256 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 8, 1961 Filed Jan. 19, 1959 KS n L D 0 C H. P. SCHOENFISCH TOOL STAND 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR HENRY P. SCHOENFISCH ATTORNEY Aug. 8, 1961 H. P. SCHOENFISCH ,2

TOOL sum: Filed Jan. 19, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

HENRY P. SCHOENF'ISCH ATTORNEY United States Patent Office 7, 2,995,256 Patented AugLS, 1961 2,995,256 TOOL STAND Henry P. Schoenfisch, 254 Fairfield Ave., Ridgewood, NJ. Filed Jan. 19, 1959, Ser. No. 787,396 Claims. (Cl. 211-60);

This invention relates to a tool stand adapted for mounting on a bench, wall, or the like.

The invention has among its objects the provision of a novel tool stand.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a simplified tool stand which is easily made, installed, and used.

Yet another object of the invention is the provision of a novel tool stand which maintains the tools held thereby in position for immediate use, which allows the tools easily to be placed within and removed from the tool stand, and which maintains the various tools in separated stored position.

A still further object is the provision of a tool stand which readily accommodates a large number of tools in a relatively small space, and which allows the storage for instant use of tools of widely varying size and shape.

The above and further objects and novel features of the invention will more fully appear from the following description when the same is read in connection with the accompanying drawings. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawings are for the purpose of illustration only and are not intended as a definition of the limits of the invention.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views,

FIG. 1 is a view in plan of a first embodiment of tool stand made in accordance with the invention, the stand being shown mounted on a fragmentarily illustrated bench.

FIG. 2 is a view in front elevation of the tool stand shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a composite fragmentary view in plan of four intermediate members of different configurations which may be substituted for the intermediate member in the tool stand shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a view in plan, on a smaller scale, of a second embodiment of tool stand made in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 5 is a view in perspective of a third embodiment of the tool stand made in accordance with the invention, such stand being shown installed on a bench or table and containing a few representative tools;

FIG. 6 is a view in perspective of a fourth embodiment of tool stand of the invention, such stand being shown mounted on a wall which constitutes a first element of the stand;

FIG. 7 is a view in perspective of a fifth embodiment of tool stand of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a view in perspective of a sixth embodiment of tool stand of the invention; and

FIG. 9 is a view in perspective of a seventh embodiment or tool stand made in accordance with the invention.

The tool stand of the invention is capable of use to advantage when mounted on a wall, on a bench or table, or at the junction of a wall and an immovably mounted bench adjacent the wall. In each of such installations the tool stand is of advantage in storing the tools so that they can be easily withdrawn for immediate use. The various embodiments of the tool stand all embody novel features in common, regardless of the preferred mode of mounting of such various embodiments of stand indicated in the drawing. The preferred construction, manner of mounting, and mode of use of the various embodiments will be apparent in the following description.

Turning now to the drawings, a first illustrative embodiment of tool stand in accordance with the invention, generally designated 14), is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Such stand is shown in FIG. 1 as being mounted on the rear edge of a bench generally indicated by character 11. Tool stand 10 is made of three parts, a rear wall member 12, a front wall member 14, and an intermediate wall member 15. Members 12, 14, and 15 may conveniently be made of sheet metal such as steel, although the invention is obviously not limited thereto.

Rear wall member 12 is in the form of an elongated plate having a flat body, which is disposed with its width disposed vertically in the installation of FIGS. 1 and 2. Front member 14 is likewise in the form of an elongated plate having a flat body parallel to and spaced forwardly from the body of member 12. At its ends the member 14 is provided with opposite angularly disposed flanges 16, 16, which extend rearwardly to the body of member 12. Oppositely longitudinally directed terminal flanges 17, 17, on flanges 16 lie flat against the forward face of the body of member 12. Flanges 17 are secured to member 12 as by being spot welded thereto, as indicated at 19. As shown, the front member 14 is narrower than rear member 12, the two members are disposed with their longitudinal axes parallel, and with the lower edge of member 14 disposed a substantial distance above the lower edge of member .12.

The intermediate member 15, which is located between members 12 and 14, is in the form of an elongated corrugated plate having corrugations of such depth that the peaks of the corrugations at the rear abut the front face of rear member 12 and the peaks of the corrugations at the front abut the rear face of front member 14. Member 15 has oppositely directed flanges 20, 20 at its ends, flanges 20 abutting the forward face of the rear member 12. The intermediate member 14 is secured to members 12 and 15 as by being spot welded at flanges 20 to member 12 and at some or all of the rear and front peaks of the corrugations of the intermediate member to the rear member 12 and the front member 14, respectively. By way of example, such peaks are indicated as being welded to the members 12 and 14 at zones indicated at 21 in FIG. 1.

The members 12, 14, and 15 present a substantial number of tool-receiving pockets or spaces, as shown in FIG. 1. The spaces between the rear member 12 and intermediate member 15 are designated 22; the spaces between front member 14 and intermediate member 15 are designated 24. Spaces 22 and 24 are identical in plan except for their reverse disposition. At the ends of the tool stand there are presented spaces 25, between the front member 14 and the rear member 12, the flanges 16 enclosing the ends of such spaces.

In the embodiment shown, the tool stand is adapted to be mounted on the rear edge of a bench, with the top of the bench at such rear edge closing the lower ends of spaces 22, 24, and 25. Accordingly, the bottom edge of rear member 12 is provided with a plurality of holes 26 to receive nails or screws driven forwardly into the rear edge of the bench top. The lower edge of front member 14 of the stand 10 has a longitudinally extending, forwardly bent flange 27 which is adapted to lie upon the top of the bench 11 at the rear edge thereof, and to be secured thereto by nails or screws driven into the bench through holes in such flange.

The upper edge of rear member 12 is provided vn'th an elongated flange 29 lying in a horizontal plane and extending rearwardly from the body of member 12. Such flange 29 has a plurality of alternating circular holes 30' and elongated holes 31 therethrough. Holes 30' and 31 are adapted to receive the shanks of tools such as screw drivers, chisels, etc., and to hold them in upright position in the tool holder.

The tool stand of the invention will receive a wide variety of tools. The stand shown by way of example will accommodate an average of 30 to 40 tools of greatly varying types and sizes. It will accept straight tools such as punches, files, cold chisels, drills, etc., which are not provided for in the average tool holder. An outstanding feature of the tool holder is independent handling of each tool. Any particular tool can be easily removed and replaced by handling only that tool. Replacement simply requires placing the end of the tool in a space or pocket in the holder, and dropping it in. There is no necessity for lining the tool up with holes, nor is any accurate setting of the tool on supports required. Almost any tool can be placed in any pocket, with the exception of open end and box wrenches, which are placed in pockets 25. Most tools, being supported in the pockets by the bench top, will tilt forward, a position offering the easiest access to the tools.

The shape of the corrugations of intermediate member 15 is capable of a wide range of variation to accommodate tools of different shapes. Four typical variants of corrugated intermediate member 15 are shown in composite FIG. 3, such alternative intermediate members being designated, respectively 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d. It will be understood that such alternative members are to be disposed between the front and rear members 14 and 12, and are to be secured thereto, in generally the same manner as intermediate member 15 in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2. It will be seen that the use of the various intermediate members shown in FIG. 3 provides tool-receiving pockets having a great variety of shapes. The one chosen, and those shown in FIG. 3 are merely illustrative, depends upon the size and shape of the tools to be supported in the tool stand.

In FIG. 4 there is shown a further embodiment of tool stand made in accordance with the invention. Such stand, which is there designated 30, in its finished form is generally similar to stand shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 with the exception that flange 29 is omitted therefrom. Stand 39 differs from stand 10, however, in that the former is made from a one-piece blank. Thus the rear wall member 12' extends from right to left Where it is joined at a flat fold to the left end of corrugated intermediate member The latter is connected at its right end to front members 14', which extends across the tool holder to terminate at the left, near the aforesaid flat fold. After the blank has been thus bent to shape, parts 12, 14', and 15 thereof are secured together as by spot welding in generally the same manner as the parts making up the tool stand of FIGS. 1 and 2. Stand is shown provided with a mounting flange 27', which is integral with the body of wall member 15'.

In FIG. 5 there is shown a tool stand, designated 31, which is similar to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 with the exception that the corrugated intermediate member is made in two parts, 32, 32, which are secured to rear member 12 and front member 15, as by being spot welded thereto. In FIG. 5 the rear member is designated 12", and the front member 14". In stand 31 the two parts 32 are spaced somewhat from each other to present a toolreceiving space or pocket 34 which is of somewhat greater width than the other pockets in the stand. Stand 31 is thus of advantage for use with a collection of tools of which most are small but one or two are large.

FIG. 6 illustrates a tool stand, generally designated 35, which is simplified design. The particular stand shown is adapted to being mounted on a wall 36 which functions as a rear partition for the stand. Stand also includes a corrugated intermediate member 37 and a front wall member 39, which may have the same spatial relationship to each other as members 15 and 14 of FIGS. 1 and 2. Members 37 and 39 need not be directly connected, and may be supported, as shown, by screws or nails driven through holes in the end flanges of such member and into the wall. The stand 35 has the tool-receiving pockets thereof closed at the bottom by a wood cross member, as shown, the tools being supported by engagement of their lower ends with such cross member.

The stand 40, shown in FIG. 7 is generally the same as stand 10 (FIGS. 1 and 2) with the exception of the corrugated intermediate member, there designated 41. The rear member in FIG. 7 is designated 12a, whereas the front member, being the same as that of FIG. 5, is designated by the same reference character, 14". Member 41 has a height which varies from a maximum at its longitudinal center to a minimum at each end. Stand thus is well adapted to the holding of a collection of tools of varying length.

Tool stand 42, shown in FIG. 8, has the parts thereof which are generally similar to those in stand 10 designated by the same reference characters. Stand 42 is designed to be mounted upon a support such as a bench 11 in a position spaced from the edges thereof. Accordingly, the bottom edge of rear member 12b is provided with a rearwardly extending horizontal flange 44, by means of which the stand is attached to the bench 11. The lower edge of front wall member 14 may have two longitudinally spaced horizontal flanges 45 by means of which the stand may be additionally fastened to the bench. In stand 42 the upper flange 29, shown in the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 2 and of FIG. 7, is omitted.

The tool stand 46 of FIG. 9 is adapted to be supported on a building partition or wall 36. In this embodiment, the rear wall member 47 and the front wall member 49 of the tool stand are integrally connected by a horizontal bottom member 50. The corrugated intermediate member 51, made as a separate piece, snugly fits between members 47 and 49. Member 47 is mounted on the wall by screws or nails, as shown. Member 51 is secured to members 47, 49, and 50, and to wall 36, by screws or nails extending into the wall through terminal flanges on member 51 and the edges of the body of member 47. As an alternative, tool stand 46 can be fastened to a bench by fastening means extending through holes in member 50. Also, member 51 can be secured to members 47, 49, and 50 by spotwelding or the like, as in the other described constructions.

Although only a limited number of embodiments of the invention have been illustrated in the accompanying drawings and described in the foregoing specification, it is to be expressly understood that various changes, such as in the relative dimensions of the parts, materials used, and the like, as well as the suggested manner of use of the tool stand of the invention, may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the in vention as will now be apparent to those skilled in the art.

What is claimed is:

1. A tool stand comprising a vertically corrugated laterally extending space divider member having end flanges lying generally in the plane of the peaks of the member on the rear side thereof, a laterally extending front wall member embracing the space divider member from end to end thereof, and means adapted to connect the space divider member and the front wall member together, the front wall member having a generally flat extended front portion substantially contacting the peaks of the space divider member on the front side thereof, and rearwardly extending vertical flanges beyond the respective ends of the space divider member.

2. A tool stand comprising a generally flat extended rear wall member, a channel-shaped front wall member having an extended generally flat portion positioned forwardly of and generally parallel to the rear wall member, rearwardly extending vertical flanges on the respective ends of the front wall member connected to the rear wall member, and at least one vertically corrugated space divider member positioned between the front and rear wall members with its rear and front peaks substantially in contact with the rear and front wall members, the space divider member having laterally oppositely extending flanges on its opposite ends, the flanges on the space divider member closely overlying the forward face of the rear wall member, the flanges on the ends of the front wall member having further, laterally oppositely extending flanges, said further flanges closely overlying the forward face of the rear wall member, the flanges on the space divider member and the further flanges on the front wall member being connected to the rear wall member.

3. A tool stand as claimed in claim 2, wherein said flanges on the space divider member and the further flanges on the front wall member are welded to the rear wall member, and at least some of the front and rear peaks of the space divider member are welded to the respective one of the Wall members which they confront. 20

4. A tool stand as claimed in claim 1, comprising a rear wall member substantially contacting the peaks of the space divider member on the rear side thereof.

5. A tool stand as claimed in claim 4, comprising a bottom member extending across the lower end of the space divider member, the bottom member being connected to at least one of the front wall member and the rear Wall member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,416,767 Vought May 23, 1922 1,495,443 Rosser May 27, 1924 1,571,000 Eustis Jan. 26, 1926 1,744,104 Carroll Jan. 21, 1930 2,488,535 Hamburg Nov. 22, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS 74,365 Norway of 1948

Patent Citations
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US1416767 *Jan 28, 1921May 23, 1922Vought George DReceptacle for barbers' equipment
US1495443 *Apr 29, 1922May 27, 1924Cleveland Dental Mfg CompanyContainer for dental burrs and the like
US1571000 *Mar 7, 1923Jan 26, 1926Eustis Grant BArticle holder
US1744104 *Aug 8, 1927Jan 21, 1930Dunbar D MacmechanPackage
US2488535 *Aug 4, 1945Nov 22, 1949Joseph H Meyer BrothersBead dipping apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3378145 *Nov 1, 1966Apr 16, 1968Jim C. GarrettGauge nest
US3905481 *Dec 17, 1973Sep 16, 1975Hines NormanSki storage rack
US4144091 *Dec 1, 1977Mar 13, 1979Tran Nguon TMagnetized, for cleaning outside
US4303158 *Sep 24, 1979Dec 1, 1981Perkins Donald RTool box
US4815592 *May 13, 1987Mar 28, 1989Brown & Williamson Tobacco CorporationNested cigarette package spacer
US5515969 *Mar 4, 1994May 14, 1996Parat-Werk Schonenbach Gmbh & Co. KgTool holder with opposing surface arrays of bunched bristles
US6003694 *Nov 20, 1997Dec 21, 1999Sharp; David G.Wall mounted clothes hanger support
US6702128May 30, 2003Mar 9, 2004Eye Designs LlcStorage system
US6935518May 27, 2003Aug 30, 2005Ss3 Storage Systems, L.L.C.System and apparatus for holding an item in storage
US7100776Mar 3, 2004Sep 5, 2006Berfield Robert CWall mounted tool holder
US7232194 *Apr 1, 2004Jun 19, 2007Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhInsert for a door storage compartment
US7353957Mar 14, 2005Apr 8, 2008Ss3 Storage Systems, L.L.C.Pegboard with through peg-hole mounting
US8056995Jul 7, 2010Nov 15, 2011Larry Mitchell GrelaToolbox assembly
US8157337Jun 16, 2009Apr 17, 2012Edwin Dizon ManalangTool box storage assembly
CN100581432CMar 2, 2005Jan 20, 2010R·C·贝弗尔德Wall mounted tool holder
EP0635338A1 *Jun 20, 1994Jan 25, 1995PARAT-WERK SCHÖNENBACH GmbH + Co KGHolder for tools, instruments or similar objects
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/70.6, 211/69, 206/373, 206/379
International ClassificationB25H3/00, B25H3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB25H3/04
European ClassificationB25H3/04