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Publication numberUS2996765 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1961
Filing dateFeb 12, 1957
Priority dateFeb 12, 1957
Publication numberUS 2996765 A, US 2996765A, US-A-2996765, US2996765 A, US2996765A
InventorsNels Nelsson
Original AssigneeUnited States Gypsum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suspended ceiling and clip therefor
US 2996765 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 22, 1961 N. NELSSON 2,996,765

SUSPENDED CEILING AND CLIP THEREFOR Filed Feb. 12, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 7%:6 M4W.

%m, iua. K M6 Mi K United States Patent 2,996,765 SUSPENDED CEILING AND CLIP THEREFOR Nels Nelsson, Chicago, 111., assignor to United States Gypsum Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Feb. '12, 1957, Ser. No. 639,810 8 Claims. (Cl. 204) This invention pertains to an improved suspended ceiling and an improved clip member which is utilized therein.

The prior art discloses a number of systems for erecting suspended ceilings of exposed tile or panels, such as acoustical tile and perforated, corrugated, sheet metal panels, commonly used in sound-absorbing ceilings. 1n the prior art, one of the systems whereby the various tiles or panels are suspended comprises the use of sheet metal, double-flanged members of general I-shaped crosssectional configuration which have an upper flange portion thereof attached to a supporting channel metal grillage by means of clips. The latter grillage is, in turn, suspended from a supporting overlying structure, such as the ceiling, by means of wires.

The main supporting members of the grillage to which the wires are attached are usually of 1- /2 inch width. Cross-bracing members of inch width are wired at predetermined intervals to the main supporting members and are disposed above and at right angles to the 1 /2 inch members. The ceiling elements comprising the acoustical tile or panels rest on the lower flange portions of the sheet metal flanged members or, in some instances, the edges of the tile have kerfs, inwardly extending on the edges thereof, which are adapted to engage the projecting flange portions of the I-shaped members.

The above-described and other comparable prior art systems, although comprising a satisfactory method of ceiling erection, are quite expensive and do not permit the individual ceiling elements to be assembled with any degree of case because of the fixed disposition of the supporting members.

It is an object of this invention, therefore, to remedy the latter defect of the prior art suspended ceiling structures by means of a novel type of suspended ceiling in which the members engaging the tile or panels are directly supported from an overlying structure by means of wires, thereby eliminating the expensive channel grillage above described.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a method of bracing the ceiling element-supporting members by means of cross-bracing members which are readily secured and disengaged from the main ceiling-element .supporting members by means of a novel clip member.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide an improved suspended ceiling which, although composed of elements which are lower in cost than those of the prior art, is erected in such a facile manner so as to result in additional savings in labor.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel clip member whereby a cross-bracing channel member and a ceiling-element supporting member may be maintained in immovable relationship in the normal position of assembly and yet permit relative slidable movement therebetween if desired.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a novel clip member which is adapted to secure a cross bracing member to an edge of a supporting T runner member and, thus, dispenses with the need for a flanged supporting surface in the supporting member.

The above and other objects of this invention will become more apparent upon a reading of the following detailed description when read in the light of the accompanying drawings and appended claims.

In one embodiment of the provided ceiling construction a plurality of parallel, substantially T-shaped runner members are provided which are suspended from an overhead supporting ceiling by means of wire members which engage apertured web portions of the runners. The lengths of the wires are adjusted so as to enable the lower flange portions of all runner members to lie in substantially the same plane. The the or panel ceiling elements which are to be suspended are adapted to have opposed edge portions resting on flange portions of the suspended T runners. It is apparent, therefore, that the interval between the latter runner members will be dependent upon the width of the tile or panel members suspended.

Employed in conjunction with the horizontally aligned T members are a plurality of cross-bracing channel members which are of a general U-shaped cross-sectional configuration and which prevent relative movement between the T runners. The latter cross-bracing members are secured to the top edge portion of the suspended runners at predetermined intervals by means of a novel clip member of substantially Y-shaped configuration.

The latter clip member has two divergent arm members which are formed integrally with two hook portions which define the distal end limits of each arm. A central, substantially V-shaped bight portion interconnects the two clip arms and functions as a means for engaging an apertured web portion of one of the T runner members which are suspended With the flange portions thereof in the lowermost position. The bottom apex portion of the clip should be no wider than the web thickness so as to snugly engage the same. In the normal course of assembly, therefore, a portion of the Y-shaped clip is inserted through an elongate transverse aperture disposed in a T runner Web portion and the bight portion of the clip straddles the T runner web portion. A crossbracing channel member is then engaged by the hook portions of the Y-shaped clip which engage a side of the U-shaped cross-bracing members. The clips clamp the cross-bracing channels to the distal web edge of the T runners and thereby prevent lateral movement of the latter channel members relative thereto. The nature of the engagement between the T runners and the crossbracing members effected by the clip members is such so as to enable the clips and T runners to be slidably movable relative to the bracing members. The latter movement is an obvious advantageous feature of the subject ceiling construction since the T runners may be accurately positioned in a facile manner to conform to the span of the supported acoustical tile or panels in the course of ceiling erection.

For a more complete understanding of this invention, reference should now be made to the drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a suspended ceiling construction;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view of the ceiling construction of FIG. 1 illustrated on a scale enlarged thereover;

FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of a clip member utilized in the illustrated construction of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is an end elevational view of a clip member illustrated in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified ceiling construction. s

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1, a ceiling construction is illustrated comprising parallel, generally T-shaped runner members 10 which may be formed of sheet metal or formed by the rolling or extruding of metal or other suitable material. Panels 12 of perforated, corrugated material such as thin sheet metal are disposed therebetween and rest on flanges 18 of the T runners. Supporting wire members 14 suspend the runners 10 from an overlying ceiling surface, not shown. The latter wire members engage the T members 10 by being threaded through apertures 16 which are disposed at predetermined intervals along the length of the runner webs 17, after which securing wire loops 19 such as those illustrated are formed.

Although the illustrated ceiling construction is shown utilizing the corrugated, perforated panels 12, it should be understood that acoustical tile and other ceiling elements having opposed straight edge portions may be suspended by means of the illustrated ceiling assembly. Also, acoustical tile may have kerfs disposed in opposed edges thereof which are adapted to engage the projecting thin flange portions 18 defining the bottom portions of the T runners illustrated in FIG. 1; note acoustical tile panels 29 in FIG. having kerfed edges 27. Utilizing such a construction, a continuous acoustical tile surface is visible to the viewer from beneath the ceiling and no portion of the suspending structure is seen.

In the illustrated suspended ceiling construction, the perforated, corrugated panels 12 have disposed on the upper surface thereof pads 20 of sound-deadening and sound-absorbing material such as glass or mineral wool. The latter pads, similarly to the underlying panels 12, should be of substantially the same width as the interval between the webs of adjacent T runners 10.

Since the runners which support the corrugated metal panels 12 and the overlying pads 20 are suspended by means of the wires 14, it is obvious that means must be provided to maintain the members 10 in parallel relationship and prevent the same from moving laterally. If such lateral movement were permissible, it is readily seen that the supported panels 12 and pads 20 might become disengaged from the flanges 18 and drop to the underlying floor.

Cross-bracing members 22 are provided with the suspended ceiling construction of FIG. 1 to maintain the runners 10 in rigid parallel relationship and prevent lateral movement of the same once the ceiling has been erected and finished. The latter bracing members are seen to comprise U-shaped channel members having opposed wall portions 24 joined by an interconnecting web portion 26-. The means provided for securing a cross-bracing member 22 to the runners 10 whereby lateral movement of the latter members transverse to the longitudinal axis thereof is prevented comprise Y-shaped clip members 28. The configuration of the latter clip members may be readily seen from the elevational views of FIGS. 3 and 4. It will be noted from FIG. 3 that the clip 28 has a central bight portion 30 which is formed integrally with divengent arm members 32. The latter arm members are also formed integrally with hook portions 34 which define the opposed distal end limits of the clip 28 and are more clearly seen in FIG. 4.

The assembly illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 in which the cross-bracing members 22 are secured to the T runners 10 is effected as follows: Disposed at predetermined intervals along the web portion of the T members 10 are elongate slots 36 which are disposed parallel to the longitudinal axes of the T runners 10. The latter elongate slots enable the clip hook and arm portions to traverse the T runner web and also enable the bight portion 30 clip is such so as to enable the bight portions 30a and 30b of the clip to readily straddle the web portion 17 of the runner 10 engaged. Following this initial straddling step, the cross-bracing member 22 is engaged by the hook portions '34 of the clip 28.

It is apparent from FIG. 1 that each transverse hook portion 34a is of substantially the same Width as the wall portions 24 of the cross-bracing channel 22. It will be further noted, more particularly from FIGS. 3 and 4, that each hook portion has a terminal portion 34b arranged at substantially right angles to said hook portions 34a. The portions 34b are disposed downwardly in the general direction of said bight portion 30. This latter relationship enables the clip hook portion to, therefore, engage a wall portion 24 of the channels 22 and resiliently urge the opposed wall portion 24 against the distal edge 38 of the T runner web portion. The latter resilient urging is made possible because the combined height of the cross-bracing member 22 and the web portion of the runner 10 which, as measured from the upper edge of slot 36 to the web edge 38, is greater than the height of the clip 28 as seen in FIG. 4. This latter relationship thus forces the two clip arms 32 and the opposed bight portions 30a and 30b of the clip 28 to bend inwardly as the clip compensates for the greater combined height of the two portions of the elements 10 and 22 above described. Simultaneously with this inward bending movement of the clip components, the web portion interposed between the two bight portions of the clip 28 will be tightly engaged, thereby tending to effect a more stable over-all construction and prevent movement therebetween.

The assembly of a clip 28 to a cross-bracing member and a T runner may be readily effected as follows. The clip member bight portion of the clip 28 is positioned astraddle a T runner apertured web portion with one clip hook portion engaging a wall portion 24 of a crossbracing member 22. The opposed hook portion and arm 32 of the clip are then urged upwardly until the hook portion snaps into place, resiliently securing the cross-bracing member to the T runner edge.

It is obvious that a tight clamping engagement between the clip bight portion and the T runner web is necessary to prevent any rotary movement of the clips 28 and the engaged cross-bracing members about the T runners. Also, it is apparent that the angular disposition of the arms 32 is dependent upon the height to which the hook portions must extend and the desired distance between the hook portion engagements with the cross-bracing member.

It is seen from FIG. 1 that each clip tends to rotate the transverse bracing channels 22 about its longitudinal axis in the direction of the arm positions 32 of the clip. This tendency of each individual clip is offset by disposing the arm portions of adjacent clip members on opposite sides of the transverse channels 22 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1. It is apparent that the elongate nature of the slots 36 of the web portions of the T runners 10 enables adjusting movements of the clips 28 to be made so as to facilitate and assure alignment of the same. The specific configuration of the slots 36, however, is not critical and may be varied from that illustrated.

Although, as above mentioned, the clips 28 resiliently urge the cross-bracing channels 22 into secure engagement with the edge portions 38 of the T runners 10, it

should be noted that the clip hook portion engagement with the wall portions of the transverse channels 22 is such so as to enable relative slidable movement to take place between the latter two ceiling elements; the henefits resulting from this movement are believed apparent. The ability to laterally move any T runner of an assembled ceiling may be assured by disposing the interposed ceiling elements between the T runner webs so that there is no flash engagement therebetween, enabling T runner movement to be eifected.

The width of each flange portion of the T runners is sufliciently small so that it is possible to remove the panels 12 by merely raising one lateral end thereof supported by a T runner flange and dropping the opposed lower end out between the two adjacent parallel T runners.

A novel ceiling has above been described which is composed of a small number of individual parts all of which are inexpensive to fabricate and all of which are of simple design. The facility with which the various ceiling components may be assembled is believed apparent from the above description. Equally important is the fact that the provided ceiling construction permits the ready replacement of any panel member.

It is also believed apparent that many modifications of the above-described ceiling may be made which will still remain within the ambit of the inventive concepts disclosed.

For instance, the T runners 10 disclosed in the illustrated ceiling securely engage the cross-bracing members, although the latter members rest on an edge. The edge 38 of the T runners enables the wires 14 to readily engage the latter members and is also a factor lessening the cost of the runner fabrication. However, a member of I cross-sectional configuration will also work to advantage so long as the clip arms are sufliciently divergent to avoid contacting the upper flange edges. It is intended, therefore, that this invention be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A suspended ceiling construction comprising a plurality of parallel elongate supporting members of substantially T-shaped cross-sectional configuration, said elongate members having an apertured web portion transversely disposed to flange portions disposed normal to each side of said web portion and formed contiguous therewith, cross-bracing members transversely disposed to said supporting members and resting on said web portion distal edge, substantially Y-shaped clip members having a resilient bight portion clampingly engaging an apertured portion of said supporting member web, and integral divergent resilient arm members having projecting hook-like end limits which engage a crossbracing member and urge the same against the distal edge of said web portion on which supported, said projecting hook-like portions of adjacent clips projecting in opposite directions, and ceiling elements disposed between adjacent elongate supporting members and resting on the opposed flange portions thereof.

A suspended ceiling construction comprising a plurality of parallel elongate supporting members having a substantially T-shaped cross-sectional configuration, said elongate members having an apertured web portion and transversely disposed flange portions contiguous therewith, cross-bracing members transversely disposed to said elongate members and resting on the distal edges of said elongate members web portions, substantially Y-shaped clip members securing said cross-bracing members to said web portion edge, said clips having a central elongate bight portion adapted to straddle apertured web portions of said elongate members, and divergent resilient arm portions formed integrally with said bight portion, said latter arm portions having hook portions defining the end limits of each of said arm portions engaging said cross-bracing members, the distance of said cross-bracing members from said clip bight portion being sufficient so as to force said clip arm portions to bend and thus enable said clip hook portions to resiliently urge said cross-bracing members against the distal edge of said elongate member web portion in the normal assembled position.

3. A suspended ceiling construction comprising a plurality of elongate members having apertured web portions intcrmediately disposed between two opposed flange portions normally disposed thereto and contiguous with one end limit of said web, suspending means aflixed to a supporting ceiling surface and engaging some of said elongate members apertured web portions whereby said elongate members may be suspended from said supporting ceiling, said elongate member flange portions lying substantially in the same plane, a plurality of parallel cross-bracing channel members disposed transversely to said elongate members and lying on the top web edge portions thereof, substantially Y-shaped clip members securing said cross-bracing channels to the edges of said elongate member webs having a central substantially V-shaped bight portion interconnecting two divergent arm portions, and hook portions defining the opposed end limits of each of said arm portions, said clip bight portion straddling an apertured web portion of said elongate members and having its opposed hook portions engaging portions of said cross-bracing channels whereby the same is resiliently urged against the top web edge of said elongate members in the normal assembled condition, and ceiling elements disposed between adjacent elongate members and having opposed edge portions thereof resting on said elongate members flange portions.

4. A suspended ceiling construction comprising a plurality of suspended elongate members having opposed flanged portions which are maintained substantially in a single horizontal plane in the normal position of assembly, suspension means for supporting said elongate members, cross-bracing members disposed transversely to said elongate members at predetermined intervals, said elongate members having intermediately disposed web portions defining the opposed flange portions thereof, and being normally disposed thereto, said web portions having slots disposed therein, said cross-bracing members resting on the distal edges of said web portions, clip means of substantially Y-shaped configuration clamping said cross-bracing members to said elongate members distal edge portions, said clip means having a substantially V-shaped central bight portion which straddles a portion of said elongate members web portion and resilient integrally formed arm portions having projecting hook portions which engage said cross-bracing means and urge the same against said elongate members, said clip hook engagement with said cross-bracing members -allowing slidable movement between said hook portion and said cross-bracing member, said elongate slots in said elongate means web portions allowing relative slidable movement between said elongate member and said clip member disposed therein, and ceiling elements disposed between adjacent elongate members and supported on opposed flange portions thereof.

5. The ceiling as recited in claim 4 in which said ceiling elements comprise panels of corrugated perforated metal having layers of sound-absorbing material disposed thereover.

6. The ceiling as recited in claim 4 in which said ceiling elements comprise panels of acoustical tile.

7. The ceiling as recited in claim 6 in which said acoustical tile panels have kerfed edges adapted to interlock with opposed flange portions of adjacent elongate members.

8. A suspended ceiling construction comprising a plurality of suspended elongate members, cross-bracing members intermittently disposed transversely to said elongate members, said elongate members having an apertured planar portion disposed in a vertical plane in the normal position of assembly, said cross-bracing members resting on the upper portions of said elongate members in the normal position of assembly, clip means of substantially Y-shaped configuration clamping said crossbracing members to said elongate members upper edge portions, said clip means having a substantially V-shaped central bight portion which straddles a portion of said elongate members apertured planar portion, said clip means also having anm portions integrally formed with said bight portion, projecting hook portions formed with the end portions of said arm portions, said hook portions engaging said cross-bracing means and resiliently urging the same against said elongate members, said clip V- shaped bight portions tightly engaging said elongate members planar portions and said clip arms being under tension in the normal ceiling construction.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS I Graham et a1. Aug. 10, 1 926 Boyle Oct. 3, 1933 Macleod Dec. 11, 1934 Jacobson Aug. 1:1, 1953 Jacobson Feb. 2, 1954 Gibson Jan. 13, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1595718 *Mar 19, 1925Aug 10, 1926Truscon Steel CoClip for supporting metal laths
US1929302 *Oct 26, 1931Oct 3, 1933Roger Boyle EldridgeChannel clip
US1984028 *May 3, 1932Dec 11, 1934F E Berry Jr & Co IncWall or ceiling construction
US2648102 *Nov 3, 1950Aug 11, 1953Level Line Ceilings IncCeiling construction
US2667667 *Nov 5, 1948Feb 2, 1954Level Line Ceilings IncAcoustic ceiling construction
US2868604 *Jun 14, 1956Jan 13, 1959Midwest Mfg CorpCentering clip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3150440 *Jul 30, 1962Sep 29, 1964Chicago Metallic Sash CompanyMethod of producing suspended ceiling runners
US3307651 *Feb 25, 1966Mar 7, 1967United States Gypsum CoAcoustical tile
US3867802 *Mar 9, 1973Feb 25, 1975Vercon ProductsFloor support assembly for building structures
US3936990 *Apr 1, 1975Feb 10, 1976Garrison Jr David HCeiling panel trim mounting means
US4483642 *May 11, 1982Nov 20, 1984Kennedy John MMine stopping and method of and jack for installing same
US4568261 *Feb 26, 1985Feb 4, 1986American Can CompanyApparatus for making a multi-layer injection blow molded container
US5037285 *Aug 3, 1990Aug 6, 1991American National Can CompanyApparatus for injection molding and injection blow molding multi-layer articles
US5523045 *Nov 18, 1994Jun 4, 1996American National Can CompanyMethods for injection molding and blow-molding multi-layer plastic articles
US5853772 *May 29, 1996Dec 29, 1998American National Can CompanyMethods and apparatus for injection molding and injection blow molding multi-layer articles, and the articles made thereby
US5968558 *May 31, 1996Oct 19, 1999American National CanApparatus for injection molding and injection blow molding multi-layer articles
US5975871 *May 30, 1996Nov 2, 1999American National CanMethods and apparatus for injection molding and injection blow molding multi-layer articles, and the articles made thereby
US6129960 *Mar 16, 1999Oct 10, 2000Pechiney Plastic Packaging, Inc.Internal layer comprises an oxygen barrier layer capable of scavenging oxygen such that the internal layer protects food protects food products within the container from oxidative degradation comprises ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer
US6194041May 29, 1996Feb 27, 2001American National Can CompanyMethods and apparatus for injection molding and injection blow molding multi-layer articles, and the articles made thereby
US6256958Mar 22, 1999Jul 10, 2001Perf-X-Dek, L.L.C.Floor joist system
US6332767Mar 15, 2000Dec 25, 2001Pechiney Emballage Flexible EuropeApparatus for injection molding multi-layer articles
USRE32675 *Oct 27, 1986May 24, 1988 Mine stopping and method of and jack for installing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/145, 181/294, 52/506.8, 52/506.6, 52/779, 52/350, 52/781.3, 52/781
International ClassificationE04B9/16, E04B9/06
Cooperative ClassificationE04B9/16
European ClassificationE04B9/16