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Publication numberUS2998337 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1961
Filing dateJun 7, 1957
Priority dateJun 7, 1957
Publication numberUS 2998337 A, US 2998337A, US-A-2998337, US2998337 A, US2998337A
InventorsTillotson Wesley T
Original AssigneeUnited States Gypsum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reflective-fibrous type insulation
US 2998337 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1961 w. T. TlLLo-rsoN REFLECTIVEFIBR0US TYPE INSULATION Filed June 7, 1957 l'United States Patent i assignments, to United States Gypsum Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed June 7, 1957, Ser. No. 664,196 4 Claims. (Cl. 154-44) The present invention relates to a novel reflectivefibrous type insulation in which a brous insulating material such as batt of mineral wool, is provided on its opposite sides or exposed surfaces with a sheet of reflective material, such as aluminum or other metal foil.

When reflective surface material or metal foil is applied as a covering for the sides and edges of a batt or fibrous insulation, such covering provides a continuous metallic link from the warmside to the cold side of the insulation whereby heat transfer through the metallic covering substantially diminishes the insulating properties of the assembled unit. Furthermore, extending the metallic surface material over and along the edges of the assembled unit performs no useful function, interferes with the successful compression packaging of these insulation units and may prevent their return to their original thickness.

By means of the present invention a continuous metallic link from the warm side to the cold side is eliminated and the novel assembly increases the insulating properties of the composite unit. In addition, it reduces the cost of the composite assembly in that it reduces the quantity of metallic reectivesurface material required, promotes successful compression packaging of these units to decrease their bulk and aids return of the compressed composite units to their original thickness.

It is, therefore, an important object of the present invention to provide a novel composite insulation unit having a sheet or strip of metal foil providing a reflective surface material on its exposed surfaces only with the metal foil providing one exposed surface being imperforate to form a vapor barrier that prevents the passage of moisture and the other sheet or strip of metal foil providing the other exposed surface being perforated to provide a permeable membrane that permits the escape of any entrapped moisture that may have collected or obtained access to the interior of the insulating unit.

Another important object of the present invention is the provision of a novel insulating unit comprising a batt of insulating material, such as mineral wool, and a novel covering or envelope encompassing the batt, such covering or envelope comprising a sheet of retaining paper overlying onel surface or side of and overlapping the opposite edges of the batt and to the exterior of this paper is superimposed and aixed a sheet of perforated metal foil providing an exposed surface, and a sheet of imperforate metal foil overlying the opposite surface or side of the batt and joined to the opposite edges of the retaining paper, the latter providing the other exposed surface of the insulating unit.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of anovel means and manner of forming an insulating unit including a batt of fibrous insulating material and an encompassing covering for the batt, said covering having a strip of metal foil or reflective surface material providing the opposite expo-sed surfaces Patented Aug. 29, 1961 2 of the unit, with the opposite edges of the unit being devoid of any metallic link between the strips of metal foil.

Further objects are to provide a construction of maximum simplicity, eciency, economy and ease of assembly and operation, and such further objects, advantages and capabilities as will later more Ifully appear and are inherently possessed thereby.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective of the novel composite insulating unit of the present invention, but with a portion of the overlying or external sheet of metal foil on one face having been broken away.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view in vertical cross section taken longitudinally through the insulating unit in a plane represented by the line 2 2 of FIG. 1 and viewed in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical cross-sec.- tional View through the insulating unit but taken in a plane represented by the line 3--3- of FIG. l and viewed in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 4 is a top plan view but on a reduced scale from that in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 of the sheet of retaining paper and its overlying strip of perforated metal foil extending longitudinally and substantially centrally of and afiixed to the paper, a portion of the strip of metal foil having been removed to show the underlying sheet of paper.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view but also on a reduced scale of the imperforate sheet of metal foil to which has been applied a coating of asphalt.

Referring to the disclosure in the drawing and to the illustrative embodiment disclosed therein, the novel insulation unit consists of a suitable thickness of fibrous insulation material, such as a batt of mineral wool 11, having a covering or envelope 12 encompassing the batt and comprising a sheet of retaining paper 13 to which is affixed a centrally arranged and longitudinally extending strip of perforated metal Ifoil or reflective material 14, such as aluminum foil, superimposed on the upper or outer surface of the paper.

'Ihe strip of metal foil 14 which is centrally disposed upon the sheet of retaining paper 13 and adhesively joined thereto is of a width to completely overlie one face or side of the batt of insulation and extend over the longitudinal corners as shown in FIG. 3, with the spaced exposed portions 15 of this paper sheet overlapping and covering the opposite edges of the batt 11, the longitudinal edges of the paper providing an external flange 16 at each side thereof.

By retaining the outer edges of the strip of metal foil 14 imperforate and unbroken, these imperforate edges provide for greater strength, surface adhesion and retention of the metal foil 14 upon the underlying sheet of retaining paper 13, and resist fraying or tearing along these edges during manufacture and use.

The other side of the batt (shown as the lower or inner surface in the drawings) is covered by a sheet of imperforate metal foil or reflective material J17 having a coating of asphalt 18 applied to one face thereof over its entire length and width, the width being substantially greater than the width of the batt of insulation 11 with the edges 19 thereof adapted to overlap the external flanges 16 of the retaining paper 13. When the edges 19 are bent over the flanges 16 to form the overlap, pressure applied to the overlap adhesively joins these edges and flanges and provides an effective seal.

These composite insulation units with the envelope or covering 12 extending for the full length of the batt are of substantial dimensions for providing insulation in the ceiling, side walls and/or flooring of an enclosure or building. When assembled, the side of the units with the sheet or strip of imperforate metal foil 17 exposed faces the interior of the enclosure so as to provide a vapor barrier against the passage of moisture to the walls, ceiling or floor. The other or outer exposed face of these insulating units is covered by the sheet or strip of perforated metal foil 14 to permit the escape of moisture or condensate that might collect.

As one example and for ease in packaging land use, these insulating units may be approximately 15 inches wide, approximately 3 inches thick and may be in units having a length approximately 24 inches, 48 inches or greater, although these measurements are intended merely as illustrative and not as a limitation of the present invention. The opposite ends `2l of the insulating batt 11 are not enclosed by the covering or envelope.

As the sheets or strips of metal foil 14 and 17 do not encompass or cover the opposite edges 22 of the novel insulating units which are covered only by the sheet of retaining paper, there is no metallic link or conduction from the warm side to the cold side of the unit so that a minimum heat transfer is effected. Furthermore, as these opposite edges 22 are not covered or enclosed by the metal foil, the units so constructed and assembled may be successfully compression packaged and, when removed from the package for use, automatically return to their original dimensions or thickness. It will be further apprecated that by retaining these edges uncovered by the metal foil, there is a substantial saving in such metal foil.

The novel insulating unit of the present invention is effective during winter when the heat flottI is up and out of a building or enclosure, and when the heat flow is down as occurs during the hot summer weather. The metal foil or reflective surface material is particularly effective when the heat flow is down and supplements the protection yafforded by the fibrous insulation for use with air conditioning or artificial cooling. As there is no metallic link or heat conduction from the warm to the cold side, the insulation value of the present assembly is increased.

Having thus disclosed the invention, I claim:

l. A resiliently compressible insulating unit for providing insulation to a building structure surface consisting of a compressible batt of insulating material; and an envelope for enclosing the normally-outer-facing and normally-inner-facing surfaces and two laterally opposed sides of said compressible batt, said envelope consisting of a paper sheet substantially completely covering said normally-outer-facing and two laterally opposed sides of said batt and extending from said sides adjacent the normally-inner-facing surface of said batt to form a pair of flanges, an imperforate metal foil sheet affixed to and substantially completely covering the normallyinner-facing surface of said batt, the lateral edge portions of said imperforate metal foil sheet being affixed to said flanges of said paper sheet, a strip of perforate metal foil aflixed to and substantially conterminous with the portion of said paper sheet covering said normally-outer-facing surface, said perforate metal foil providing a heat-reflective surface and permeable membrane for the escape of moisture vapor entrapped in said batt, andthe portions of said paper sheet covering the laterally opposed sides of said batt being substantially free and uncoveredy by said metal foil sheets, whereby there is no contact between said perforate and imperforate `foil sheets.

2. A resiliently compressible insulating unit for providing insulation to a building structure surface consisting of a compressible batt of fibrous insulation; and an envelope for enclosing the normally-outer-facing and normally-inner-facing surfaces and two laterally opposed sides of said compressible batt, said envelope consisting of a paper sheet substantially completely covering said normally-outer-facing surface and two laterally opposed sides of said batt and extending from said sides adjacent the normally-inner-facing surface of said batt to form a pair of flanges, an imperforate metal foil sheet adhesively aflixed to and substantially `completely covering the normally-inner-facing surface of said batt, the lateral edge portions of said imperforate metal foil sheet being affixed to said flanges of said paper sheet, a strip of perforate metal foil affixed to and substantially conterminous with the portion of said paper sheet covering said normally-outer-facing surface, said perforate metal providing a heat-reflective surface and permeable membrane yfor the escape of moisture vapor entrapperd in said batt, and the portions of said paper sheet covering the laterally opposed sides of said batt being substantially free and uncovered by said metal foil sheets, whereby there is no contact between said perforate and imperforate foil sheets.

3. A resiliently compressible insulating unit for providing insulation to a building structure surface consisting of a compressible batt of fibrous insulation; and an envelope for enclosing the normally-outer-facing and normally inner-facing surfaces and two laterally opposed sides of said compressible batt, said envelope consisting of a paper sheet substantially completely covering said normally-outer-facing surface and two laterally opposed sides of said batt and extending from said sides adjacent the normally-inner-facing surface of said batt to form a pair of flanges, an imperforate metal foil sheet adhesively affixed to and substantially completely covering the normally-inner-facing surface of said batt, the lateral ed-ge portions of said inperforate metal foil sheet being adhesively affixed to said flanges of said paper sheet, a strip of perforate metal foil affixed to and substantially conterminous with the portion of said paper sheet covering said normally-outer-facing surface, said perforate metal foil being devoid of perforations in the lateral portions adjacent the juncture of said normally-outeryfacing surface and the side surfaces to provide for greater strength and surface retention of said lateral portions of said perforate metal foil to the paper sheet and to resist fraying and tearing along said lateral portions of said perforate metal foil, said perforate metal foil providing a heat reflective surface and permeable membrane adapted to permit the escape of moisture vapor entrapped in said batt, and the portions of said paper sheet covering the laterally opposed sides of said batt being substantially free and uncovered by said metal foil sheets, whereby there is no contact between said perforate and imperforate foil sheets.

4. A resiliently compressible insulating unit for providing insulation to a building structure surface consisting of a compressible batt of fibrous insulation; and an envelope for enclosing the normally-outer-facing and normally-inner-facing surfaces and two laterally opposed sides of said compressible batt, said envelope consisting of a paper sheet substantially completely covering said normally-outer-facing surface and two laterally opposed sides of said batt and extending from said sides adjacent the normally-inner-facing surface of said batt to form a pair of flanges, a sheet of imperforate metal foil having a coating of asphalt on one surface thereof, which surface is adhesively affixed to and covers the normally-innerfacing surface of said batt and is in overlapping and sealed relationship to said flanges, a strip of perforate metal foil alixed to and substantially conterminous with the portion of said paper sheet covering said normally-outerfacing surface, said perforate metal foil being devoid of perforations in the lateral portions adjacent the juncture of said normally-outer-facing surface and the side surfaces to provide for greater strength yand surface retention of said lateral portions of said perforate metal `foil to the paper sheet and to resist fraying and tearing along said lateral portions of said perforate metal foil, said perforate metal foil providing a heat reflective surface and permeable membrane adapted to permit the escape of moisture vapor entrapped in said batt, and the portions of said paper sheet covering the laterally opposed sides of said ybatt being substantially free and uncovered by References Cited in the iile of this patent said metal foil sheets, whereby there is no contact be- 10 2,757,116

tween said perforate and imperforate foil sheets.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Roos June 13, 1933 Benedict Dec. 14, 1937 Schenk Mar. 5, 1940 Grassick Mar. 2, 1943 Russum Nov. 27, 1951 Lemmerman Apr. 6, 1954 Clements July 31, 1956 UNITED STATES PATENT OEEICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No?. 2,998,337 l August 29V 1961 Wesley T. Tillotson It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patentrequiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as 'corrected below.

Column 3, line 35, for "apprecated" read appreciated column 4L, line I6, after "metal" insert foil line 189 for "entrapperd" read entrapped line 27, after "normally", second occurrence, insert a hyphen.

Signed and sealed this 13th day of February 1962.

C SEA L) Attest:

ERNEST w. VSWIDEE Attesting Officer DAVID L. LADD Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1914345 *Jul 7, 1932Jun 13, 1933United States Gypsum CoWall construction
US2101836 *Oct 21, 1936Dec 14, 1937Elb Products IncThermal insulating building unit
US2192653 *Nov 13, 1937Mar 5, 1940Eduard SchenkAcoustic construction
US2312987 *Nov 15, 1939Mar 2, 1943Alfol Insulation Company IncHeat insulating panel
US2576698 *Apr 14, 1948Nov 27, 1951Johns ManvilleMetal-sheathed insulating blanket and method of manufacture
US2674335 *Jan 31, 1950Apr 6, 1954C W Lemmerman IncMuffler construction
US2757116 *Apr 8, 1953Jul 31, 1956Macmillan ClementsStructural panel and method of making same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3060069 *Oct 23, 1959Oct 23, 1962Fred E SindarsInsulating jacket for fluid lines and the like
US3095943 *May 29, 1961Jul 2, 1963Soundlock CorpAcoustical structure
US3207640 *Dec 14, 1961Sep 21, 1965Avco CorpMethod of making reinforced material
US3222243 *Jul 11, 1962Dec 7, 1965Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpThermal insulation
US3300367 *Apr 29, 1964Jan 24, 1967William M SwartzAdvertising display
US3435948 *Aug 8, 1966Apr 1, 1969Ethicon IncGas sterilizable package
US3504462 *Sep 30, 1968Apr 7, 1970Conwed CorpLay-in type suspended ceiling and panel therefor
US3835604 *Dec 14, 1972Sep 17, 1974Certain Teed Prod CorpBuilding insulation with decorative facing
US3881569 *Sep 6, 1973May 6, 1975Jr William O EvansSoundproofing panel construction
US3948347 *Nov 25, 1974Apr 6, 1976Gallagher-Kaiser CorporationAcoustical panel
US4035535 *Feb 2, 1976Jul 12, 1977Rolls-Royce (1971) LimitedSound attenuating structure
US4151692 *Jul 15, 1977May 1, 1979Emerson H. MizellT-Shaped insulation with vapor barrier
US4730748 *Apr 24, 1987Mar 15, 1988William BaneReusable insulated box
US4947596 *May 22, 1989Aug 14, 1990Kight Jerry DClosure for roof vent
US5169481 *Mar 16, 1990Dec 8, 1992Philip Morris IncorporatedApparatus making thin laminate structures and forming the structures into lightweight, thin-walled tubes
US5441170 *Feb 16, 1994Aug 15, 1995Bane, Iii; William W.Shipping container with multiple insulated compartments
US5979693 *Dec 29, 1997Nov 9, 1999Bane, Iii; William W.Panel for shipping containers
US8122666 *Aug 10, 2007Feb 28, 2012Vivek GuptaInsulating and heat dissipating panels
US9249571 *Jun 5, 2014Feb 2, 2016Arthur Paul WhiteInsulating system
US20060201089 *Mar 9, 2005Sep 14, 2006Duncan Richard SSpray foam and mineral wool hybrid insulation system
US20080034698 *Aug 10, 2007Feb 14, 2008Vivek GuptaInsulating and heat dissipating panels
US20100011689 *Jul 15, 2009Jan 21, 2010Lippy William ASystem and method for providing a reflective insulation layer
EP2053176A1 *Oct 23, 2008Apr 29, 2009Knauf Gips KGStructural panel with shielding effect
EP2058451A1 *Nov 12, 2007May 13, 2009Knauf Gips KGStructural panel with screening effect
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/406.1, 428/138, 156/87, 156/252, 52/145
International ClassificationE04B1/80
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/80
European ClassificationE04B1/80