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Publication numberUS2999378 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1961
Filing dateJan 23, 1961
Priority dateJan 23, 1961
Publication numberUS 2999378 A, US 2999378A, US-A-2999378, US2999378 A, US2999378A
InventorsBlair William B
Original AssigneeBlair William B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski clamp
US 2999378 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. B. BLAIR Sept. 12, 1961 SKI CLAMP Filed Jan. 25, 1961 INVENTOR. WILLIAM B. BLAIR ATTORNEY United rates 2,999,378 SKI CLAMP William B. Blair, 1006 Heron St., Anaheim, Calif. Filed Jan. 23, 1961, Ser. No. 84,267

' 12 Claims. (Cl. 705S) This invention relates to'a ski clamp whereby a pair of skis may be attached to a fixed object, such as a tree or post, to prevent theft or unauthorized movement at a pair of skis.

An object of my invention is to provide a novel and etiective means of securely clamping a pair of skis in adjacent clamps so that, once the clamp is latched around the skis, the skis cannot be removed from the clamp mechanism until the clamping mechanism is unlocked, which then releases both of the skis.

Another object of my invention is to provide a means whereby the clamping or holding elements can be adjusted to fit difierent sized skis.

Still another object is to provide a novel ski clamp of the character stated which cannot be tampered with or surreptitiously opened, since the adjustable elements of the ski clamp are all covered or hidden once the ski clamp is secured around the skis.

A feature of my invention resides in the simplicity and compactness of the structure, whereby the ski clamp can be readily moved from place to place as necessary, and also readily assembled around the two skis which are placed in parallel relation to each other, which is the normal arrangement for carrying or storing skis.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention may appear from the accompanying drawing, the subjoined detailed description and the appended claims.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective of my ski clamp in open position.

FIGURE 2 is a horizontal sectional view of a pair of skis in positon in the ski clamp, and with the clamp shown in vertical elevation.

FIGURE 3 is an exploded view of the adjustable elements of the ski clamp.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, the numeral 1 indicates a base plate which is formed of relatively narrow stock, and one end of this plate is bent upwardly' as shown at 2. This upwardly bent portion has a length corresponding to the height of the skis when they are placed in the clamp, as will be subsequently described. An outwardly projecting tongue 3 is fixedly formed or attached to the base plate 1 at the end opposite the bent portion 2. A chain 4 is secured at one end to the base plate 1, and at the other end to a latch segment 5 which is provided with a slot 6 to fit over the tongue 3. When the latch plate 5 is fitted over the tongue 3 in the manner shown in FIG. 2, a lock 7 can be inserted in the tongue 3 to hold the chain 4 in its position attached to the base plate 1 and encircling a tree, post or the like. A latching strap 8 is pivotally secured at one end to the bent member 2, as shown at 9. A hasp plate 10 is pivotally secured to the strap 8 at the end opposite the pivot 9 and is formed with an elongated slot 11 which fits over the tongue 3, when the parts are in latched position as shown in FIG. 2. Thus it will be evident that when the strap 8 is latched to the tongue 3, the base plate 1 and the strap 8 will be in spaced parallel arrangemnet, one on each side of the skis as will be subsequently described. Two pairs of spaced and parallel angle members 12-43 and 14-45 are all mounted on the base plate 1. The angle members 12 and 14 are fixedly secured to the upper surface of the base plate 1 by suitable means, such as welding or otherwise. The angle members are each provided with a yieldable rubber or plastic liner 16, which liner engages the side edges of the skis 17 and 18, as shown in its 2 FIG. 2. The skis 17 and '18 fit tightly between and against the rubber strip 16, thus securely holding the skis against endwise movement once the ski clamp has been closed and locked. i

So that the angle members 13 and 15 may be moved lengthwise of the base plate 1 to adjust these parts against the edges of the skis 17 and 18, the angle members are adjustably mounted on the base plate 1 as follows: The base plate 1 is toothed or serrated,. as shown at 19, throughout the central portion of the base plate. The angle member 13 is provided with a projecting flat finger 20 which is toothed or serrated on both its upper and lower surfaces, as shown at 21. The angle member 15 is also provided with a projecting finger 22 which is toothed or serrated on its bottom surface, as shown at 23. Thus the serrated surfaces 19, 21 and 23 will hold the angle members 13 and 15 in the desired adjusted position. The finger 20 is formed with an elongated slot 24 and the finger 22 is formed withan elongated slot 25, which slots are aligned to receive a bolt 26 therethrough. The bolt passes through both of the slots and is threaded into the base plate 1, thus securely holding the parts in position. A cup 27 surrounds the head of the bolt 26, thus protecting the head of the bolt against possible tampering by a thief who might attempt to unscrew the bolt in order to remove the skis. When the strap 8 is in closed or latched position, it also covers the bolt 26 to prevent unauthorized tampering.

A rubber strip 28 is mounted on the bottom of the strap 8 and is positioned within a tray 29 on the bottom of the strap 8. A plurality of shims 3d are positioned between the rubber strip 28 and the bottom of the strap 8 to permit adjustment of the rubber strip 28 so that it may tightly engage the top of the skis 17 and 18, as shown in FIG. 2. The shims 3% are held in position by means of cap screws 31 which extend through the shims and thread into the strap 8.

In operation: The angle members 1213 and 1415 are first adjusted to tightly fit against the edges of the skis 17 and 18, that is, the rubber inserts 16 press tightly against the outer and inner edges of both of the skis. This adjustment is accomplished by loosening the bolt 26 and then moving the angle members 13 and 15 a required amount. After adjustment the bolt 26 is retightened to securely hold the angle members 13-15 in parallel relationship to the side edges of the skis. The rubber strip 28 has previously been adjusted so it will tightly press against the top of the skis 17 and 13 when the skis are in the clamp. The chain 4 is now thrown around a tree or post and the latch plate 5 is fitted on the tongue 3. The hasp plate 10 is now also fitted over the tongue 3 and an appropriate padlock or the like is locked through the tongue 3, thus holding all of the parts securely in positon and holding the skis 1'7 and 18 against unauthorized removal.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A ski clarnp consisting of a base plate, a strap hinged ly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate.

2. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and a yieldable liner in each of the angle members on which the ski rests.

3. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the'pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and a yieldable strip on the bottom of said strap to bear against the skis.

4. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other endof the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and a yieldable liner in each of the angle members on which the ski rests, and a yieldable strip on the bottom of said strap to bear against the skis.

5. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and means adjustably mounting one of each of said pairs of angle members on the base plate.

6. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strapto the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of 'angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and means adjustably mounting one of each of said pairs of angle members on the base plate, and a yieldable liner in each of the angle members on which the ski rests.

7. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strapto the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and means adjustably mounting one of each of said pairs of angle members on the base plate, and a yieldable strip on the bottom of said strap to bear against the skis.

8. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, and means adjustably mounting one of each of said pairs of angle members on the base plate, and a yieldable liner in each of the angle members on which the ski rests, and a yieldable strip on the bottom of said strap to bear against the skis.

9. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to thei-oase plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, a finger on one of each of said pairs of angle members, said fingers overlapping, the engaging surfaces of said fingers being serrated, and a bolt extending through both of the fingers and into the base plate.

10. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, a finger on one of each of said pairs of angle members, said fingers overlapping, the engaging surfaces of said fingers being serrated, and a bolt extending through both of the fingers and into the base plate, and a yieldable liner in each of the angle members on which the ski rests. V

11. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced 'angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebet-ween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, a finger on one of each of said pairs of angle members, said fingers overlapping, the engaging surfaces of said fingers being serrated, and a bolt extending through both of the fingers and into the base plate, and a yieldable strip on the bottom of said strap to bear against the skis.

12. A ski clamp consisting of a base plate, a strap hingedly attached at one end to the base plate, means locking the other end of the strap to the base plate, two pairs of spaced angle members mounted on the base plate, each of the pairs of spaced angle members being adapted to receive a ski therebetween, said strap extending over both of the pairs of angle members, and a chain attached to the base plate, a finger on one of, each of said pairs of angle members, said fingers overlapping, the engaging surfaces of said fingers being serrated, andlabolt extending through both of the fingers and into the base plate, and a yieldable liner in each of the angle members on which the ski rests, and a yieldable strip on the bottom of said strap to bear against the skis.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Norway May 27, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2831335 *Aug 6, 1957Apr 22, 1958Kidd Robert OLocking mechanism
NO72124A * Title not available
NO72156A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3242704 *Aug 6, 1964Mar 29, 1966Barreca Henry JSki racks
US3754420 *Oct 30, 1972Aug 28, 1973Oellerich WAnti-theft apparatus for skis
US3905214 *Jan 25, 1974Sep 16, 1975Bell Sterling WSki lock
US3999410 *Sep 25, 1975Dec 28, 1976Hall Henry VPortable locking means for skis
US4063646 *Dec 16, 1975Dec 20, 1977National Manufacturing CompanyLatched rod rack
US4268050 *Jul 27, 1979May 19, 1981Kennedy Sr Richard BSki accessory transportation and storage system
US4785980 *Mar 16, 1987Nov 22, 1988Redick Ronald LSki carrier
US4825513 *Aug 20, 1987May 2, 1989Burndy CorporationModular adjustable clamp system
US4856811 *Mar 12, 1987Aug 15, 1989Magwin Enterprises, Inc.Device for transporting ski equipment
US5119980 *Mar 15, 1991Jun 9, 1992Yakima Products, Inc.Ski mount with ratchet-type closure
US7276665Jun 9, 2006Oct 2, 2007Rauckman James BWildlife guard for electrical power distribution and substation facilities
US7309837Sep 14, 2006Dec 18, 2007Rauckman James BWildlife guard for electrical power distribution and substation facilities
US7679000Mar 16, 2010Rauckman James BWildlife guard with overmolded conductive material
US7772499Aug 10, 2010Rauckman James BWildlife guard for electrical power distribution and substation facilities
US8136709Jan 23, 2007Mar 20, 2012Yakima Products, Inc.Article carriers
US8752864 *Feb 25, 2011Jun 17, 2014Sabina Francisca Estrugo MariSki transportation device
US9283884Apr 30, 2013Mar 15, 2016Yakima Produtcs, Inc.Attachment devices for vehicle rooftop rack accessories
US20040172990 *Mar 6, 2003Sep 9, 2004David O' RoukeLocking device for aluminum staging poles
US20070131447 *Feb 7, 2007Jun 14, 2007Rauckman James BWildlife guard with overmolded conductive material
US20070235489 *Jan 23, 2007Oct 11, 2007Yakima Products, Inc.Article carriers
US20080289856 *Jul 9, 2008Nov 27, 2008Rauckman James BWildlife guard for electrical power distribution and substation facilities
US20130033030 *Feb 25, 2011Feb 7, 2013Sabina Francisca Estrugo MariSki transportation device
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/814, 24/335
International ClassificationA63C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C11/006
European ClassificationA63C11/00F4