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Publication numberUS3001559 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1961
Filing dateJun 29, 1960
Priority dateJun 29, 1960
Publication numberUS 3001559 A, US 3001559A, US-A-3001559, US3001559 A, US3001559A
InventorsAlexander Szopo
Original AssigneeAlexander Szopo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable combination carpenter's work bench
US 3001559 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 26, 1961 A. szoPo 3,001,559

PORTABLE COMBINATION CARPENTERS WORK BENCH Filed June 29, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet l HMM r www@ @ww Q QN um kwam .NN Nk UH V NToR. agilfana] Q30/170 as/Q @76V TroRNEv Sept. 26, 1961 A. szoPo PORTABLE COMBINATION CARPENTER'S WORK BENCH 4 Sheets-Shea?l 2 Filed June 29, 1960 m l a NC@ ORRVRNRB\ v\ A ,w 1 l 1 f N 1\ f/b J| 1\ /NB R RNE wm wm NW ou 645g INVENTOR.

ceandv/@fa BY E i ATTORNEY Sept. 26, 1961 A. szoPo PORTABLE coMBINAToN CARPENTERS woRx BENCH 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 29, 1960 @57% INVENroR.

15g-2;; ATTORNEY.

Sept. 26, 1961 A. szoPo PORTABLE COMBINATION CARPENTERS WORK BENCH Filed June 29, 1960 4 Sheets-Shea?l 4 C57 C! INVENTOR.

BY :SZ/5a?? @hr/jim Z; QAM

' ATTORNEY.

United States Patent O 3,001,559 PORTABLE CQMBINATION CARPENTERS WORK BENCH Alexander Szopo, 346 Sudan St., New Brunswick, NJ. Filed June 29, 1960, Ser. No. 39,636 2 Claims. (Cl. 144-286) This invention relates to a portable work bench particularly useful to carpenters and similar artisans. More specifically, it deals with a combination bench employing a narrow base in which angular grooves are cut and in which grooves may be inserted metal plates adapted to protrude above the grooves and serve as stops and vise elements, either by themselves, or in combina- -tion with other elements of the combination.

A carpenters bench is generally associated with a heavy unit which is usually installed, for example, in a hobbyists cellar, in a rather permanent manner. There has been need for a sturdy, light-weight, portable bench for such use, but, so far, there has been no such successful unit. Most of the difficulty in producing one generally stems from the assumption that a wide table must be employed and that the conventional vises and vise grips must be used to obtain satisfactory service.

According to the present invention, a highly useful and sturdy work bench may be produced, which is still very light and readily movable by handinto remote or often inaccessible locations. The bench features a very narrow base and very light, yet effective, vise grips and stops.

The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawings in which a preferred embodiment is described, and in which FIGURE l depicts a side view of a bench of the present invention on which a wooden work-piece is mounted. FIGURE 2 illustrates a top or plan View of the unit show in FIG- URE l, while FIGURE 3 presents a front view thereof. A top View of the base itself is shown in FIGURE 4, while FIGURE 5 is a top viewV of the forward end of the base, with the vise screw mountings cut away, depicting the manner of holding the vise screw. FIGURE 6 illustrates a top view of the forward vise board, as mounted on the base, and adapted for mitering use, and FIGURE 7 illustrates a cross-sectional side view of the rear end of the base, showing optional use of the rear leg as a thrust element. FIGURE 8 pres-ents a partially cutaway perspective view of a combination thrust block to be used with the aforesaid bench, while FIGURES 9, and ll illustrate side, top, and side views, respectively (partly in cross-section), of the rear portion of the bench variously adapted for using the aforesaid block. Similar numerals refer to similar parts in the various views.

Referring again to the drawings, numeral 1 represents a long narrow board or base such as a 2" X 4 mounted at S, 9, 8 and 9 to legs 11, 10, 11 and 10', respectively. Legs 10 and 11 cross and are joined at 7, while legs 10' and i1 cross and are joined at 7 Mounted on top of the forward portion of board base 1 is narrow vise board 22 which preferably is of the same width as base I, and which could be a l x 4". Mounted onto the bottom of board 22 by screws 21 are swivel mountings I9 and 19 The latter hold threaded vise screw 5 which fits into channel 54 in the top of base 1 and which screw rides longitudinally therein. Threaded nut 6 (in which screw 5 rotates) is anchored in complementary recess 6 of channel 54. Since nut 6 remains stationary as screw 5 moves therein, the rotation of screw 5 by handle 25 causes the screw to move vise board 22 longitudinally over base 1. Pins 1-7, inserted laterally through base 1 over screw 5, insure that vise board 22 does not separate from base 1 while in use.

The top of vise board 22 is provided with narrow Patented Sept. 26, 1961 ICC laterally-cut grooves 23, 23', 23" of `about V2 depth, into which may be slipped narrow metal strips 24 and 24. These strips are higher than the depth of the grooves, so that they protrude about 1/2 above the top of board 22, and thus serve as vise-engaging means, or as stops. Most of the grooves, e.g., grooves 23, 23', are angularly cut (at an angle of about -8S) into board 22 so that the metal strips 24 inserted therein point toward the rear 20 of board 22, although one or two grooves 23 (FIG. 2) may point in the opposite direction and may accommodate strips 24 which serve as stops for narrow work pieces, such as slats or frame pieces, which may be laid laterally over board 22 against stop 23 and be cut oi by means of a saw. When metal strips 24 are inserted in the rearwardly-directed grooves 23, 23', the projecting upper portions thereof serve as vise gripping means, as will be hereinafter explained. The rearward upper portion 55 of base 1 is provided with forwardly-slanted grooves 12, 12', which are directed at similar angles but in opposite direction to that of grooves 23, 23.

Adapted to be disposed over the rearward upper portion 55 of base 1 is vise board 36 which may be similar to vise board 22, but preferably shorter. The bottom of this board 36 also is provided with similar lateral grooves 56, 56' which are parallel to grooves 12, 12, so that when a metal strip or plate 13 is inserted into a lower groves 12', it will iit into an upper groove 56 also, thereby providing an anchor which serves to prevent any longitudinal movement of vise board 36 on base 1. Yet, board 36 may be readily sparated from base i by mere lifting, whereupon -it is disengaged from metal anchoring strip 13.

VThe top portion of vise board 36 likewise is provided with grooves 26, 26 which are closely parallel to forwardly-directed grooves 12, 12', i.e., oppositely directed to grooves 23, 23' in vise board 22, so that, when metal strip `27 is inserted in groove 26 of board 36 and strip 24 is inserted in groove 23 of board 22, it is possible to insert therebetween a work piece, such as board 2S whose ends 30 and 30 abut the projecting strips 27 and 24, respectively. By turning screw 5 (by means of handle 25), it is possible to clamp workpiece 28 firmly between plates 27 and 24, and said piece thus is gripped adequately for planing, drilling, or any other carpentry work desired.

While working on piece 28, it is preferred to have end 2 of base 1 abut a wall 3, or other stationary solid object. Auxiliary leg 14, provided with dowel portion 15, may be inserted in hole i6 in the bottom of base 1 to serve as an additional support. In locations where a wall is not readily accessible, for contact with end 2 leg 14 may be inserted in hole 31 in end 2 of base 1 (as in FIG. 7), and thus serve as a thrust support for the bench.

Wooden panel portions 32 having shelf ledges 32 may be attached by screws 33 to legs 10-10 and 11-1i to hold tools or boards. It will be noted from FIGURE 2 that legs 10-10 and 11-11' are wider apart than at their mounting portions 8 8 and 9-9, thus providing a more stable support for the bench.. For example, while the support portions 8-8 may be 3%" apart, the legs 11-11 at floor level may be 20" apart. Also, legs 10 and 10 may be about 20" away from their opposite mates 11 and 11' at Vthe oor level. Base 1 may be 30"-40 long, while board 22 may be 18"-22" long, and board 36 about l0 to 20" long, more or less. The preferred height of base 1 above floor level is about 36".

It will be noted that the work bench of the present invention is very light, small, portable, and inexpensive. Yet, it is sturdy and very useful, even for the commercial home builders or for home hobby carpenters. The work piece 28 not only may be mounted between plates 27 and 3 24, but it may be mounted in space 29 between end 20 of board 22 and either end 58 of board 36 or plate 13 in portion 55 of base 1, depending on the exigencies arising and the type of work to be done. In fact, boards can be Vlaid in-spaceS on the crossed leg pieces and cut oi readily and accurately.

As can be seen fro-m FIGURE 4, vise board 22 may have, besides the lateral grooves 23, several angular grooves 3d and 35 (i.e., grooves angular to grooves 23). When plate 24 is inserted in these angular grooves, a board 49 maybe placed :there against and a mitering cut may be made on board 40 for framing, and the like, by use of saw 41.

FIGURE 2 illustrates aicombination thrust sleeve or box indicated generally by numeral .6th and preferably made of metal, such as aluminum, brass or steel. lt is made in hollow rectangular form and is adapted to slide loosely over base .1. This sleeve 60 has top 67, partial bottom 62, and sides 61 and 68. Top 67 has its rear end bent down at an angle into the hollow as a rectangular flap 63, while bottom 62 has a similar downwardly bent flap 64. It kwill 4be noted that both upper and lower flaps are bent at the same angle as that of grooves 26, 12, etc., so that one of these flaps may be inserted in a groove to serve as a Vstop or as a vise element, as illustrated in FIGURES 9-11. Actually, ap 63 is given a more acute angle than flap 64, since it must have its forward end 66 in raised Yposition when it is locked in groove 12.

As shown in FIGURES 9 and l0, flap 63 may be inserted in a groove 12, and the forward end 66 raised so as to serve as a stop for work piece 28. This raising of end 66 is made possible by the fact that bottom 62 is open at 65. Vise board 22, may then be screwed up tightly against workpiece 28 to hold it in place for carpentry. p

In FIGURE 11, block 60 is up-ended so that flap 64 fits into a groove 26 in board 36. In this case, the rear end of block 60 serves as a stop for workpiece 23, and plate 24 in groove 23 of board 22 serves as the other vise element between which piece 28Yis held, the tightening being done by vise handle in all cases.

Thus it is apparent that, with the combination of elements herein described, it is possible to work on all sorts of work pieces in various positions as the exigencies of the occasion require.

Although a carpenters benchvof regular size has been described herein, it is to be understood that a similar bench on a smaller scale for'use as a childs toy bench also is within the purview of this invention.

I claim:

1. A `portable combination carpenters work bench in which a workpiece may be mounted, comprising a narrow board base, legs attached to the sides thereof and disposed wider apart at their bottoms, parallel grooves cut laterally into the upper surface of the rear portion of said base and directed upwardly at a forward angle, a vise screw housed in the forward end of said base in a manner so as to move longitudinally with respect thereto, a narrow vise board mounted over the forward end of said base and connected to said vise screw in a manner so as to move longitudinally therewith, a rigid plate of size sufficient to slide into a groove and to project thereabove sufiiciently to serve as a stop for a workpiece disposed between said plate and said board, and to hold said workpiece when said board is clamped against said work-piece by means of said vise screw, and a hollow rigid sleeve adapted to tit and slide loosely over said base, and having a top, a partial bottom, and sides, and having a downwardly-directed flap projecting rearwardly from the rear of the top at an angle such as to enable fitting of said flap into a groove when the forward end of said sleeve is raised to serve as a stop for a workpiece.

2. A portable combination carpenters work bench in which a workpiece may be mounted comprising a narrow board base, legs attached to the sides thereof and disposed wider apart at their bottoms, parallel grooves cut laterally into the upper surface of the rear portion of said base and directed upwardly at a forward angle, a vise screw housed in the forward end of said base in a manner so as to move longitudinally with respect thereto, a narrow vise board mounted over the forward end of said base and connected to said vise screw in a manner so as to move longitudinally therewith, a rigid plate of size sufficient to slide into a groove and to project thereabove sufficiently to serve as a stop for a workpiece disposed between said plate and said board, and to hold said workpiece when said board is clamped against said workpiece by means of said Vise screw, a hole in the bottom of the rear portion of said base, a separate leg having an end adapted to t into said hole, and a hole in the rear end of said base and designed to accommodate the end of said separate leg which then would serve as a thrust element.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 298,560 Doty May 13, 1884 1,191,687 Gillett July 18, 1916 1,574,528 Youngman et al. Feb. 23, 1926 1,810,995 Woelk .Tune 23, 1931 2,637,358 Larson -..t May 5, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US298560 *Mar 15, 1884May 13, 1884 Bench-dog
US1191687 *Apr 25, 1916Jul 18, 1916Fred L GillettMechanic's trestle.
US1574528 *Mar 18, 1925Feb 23, 1926John Youngman OttoWorkbench
US1810995 *Jul 23, 1930Jun 23, 1931Woelk William HWoodworker's clamp
US2637358 *Apr 27, 1948May 5, 1953Larson Charles OSaw horse with a shiftable tool tray
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3177974 *Aug 31, 1961Apr 13, 1965Easy Horse IncSaw horse
US4073484 *Oct 4, 1976Feb 14, 1978The Black And Decker Manufacturing CompanyPortable workbench assembly
US4127260 *Apr 2, 1976Nov 28, 1978Inventec International LimitedWorkbench with quick setting vise structure
US4155386 *Feb 3, 1977May 22, 1979The Black And Decker Manufacturing CompanyFoldable workbench
US4157174 *May 4, 1977Jun 5, 1979Inventec International LimitedCollapsible workbenches
US4159821 *Mar 28, 1977Jul 3, 1979Inventec International LimitedCollapsible dual-height workbench
US4415149 *Jun 25, 1981Nov 15, 1983Wen Products, Inc.Portable workbench
US5289897 *Oct 22, 1992Mar 1, 1994Wiehe Jr William HSawbuck including vierendeel truss construction
US7059616 *Aug 17, 2004Jun 13, 2006Super Made Products Co., Ltd.Cutting machine push cart
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/286.1
International ClassificationB25H1/04, B23D47/04, B25H1/00, B23D47/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25H1/04, B23D47/04
European ClassificationB25H1/04, B23D47/04