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Publication numberUS3001573 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1961
Filing dateApr 22, 1957
Priority dateApr 22, 1957
Publication numberUS 3001573 A, US 3001573A, US-A-3001573, US3001573 A, US3001573A
InventorsAbe J Hanje, Robert H Hunter, Harris W Smith
Original AssigneeHunter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Extension tube torch
US 3001573 A
Images(3)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 1961 R. H. HUNTER ETAL 3,001,573

EXTENSION TUBE TORCH Filed April 22, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS Robe/'2" H-Hun'fe! Abe J. Han e a! BY Harris Jim ff: B W, W

Hm M M Attorneys Sept. 26, 1961 R. H. HUNTER ETAL EXTENSION TUBE TORCH 3 SheetsSheet 2 INVENTORS Ruben H. Hun-fer Abe J. Han/e Ml BY Harris W SmH'h BM, 5W,

A Harries s Sept. 26, 1961 R. H. HUNTER EI'AL 3,001,573

EXTENSION TUBE TORCH Filed April 22, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS fiEn14- Rober'f H.Hun'l'c.r Abe .J. Hanje M BY Harris l/V- Sm/i'h- Bowl-MM, SW,

WWQM United States Patent 3,001,573 EXTENSION TUBE TORCH Robert H. Hunter, Gates MillSyOhiO Hunter Manufacturing Co., 30525 Aurora Road, Solon, Ohio), Abe J. Hanje, Northfield, and Harris W. Smith, Bainbridge, Ohio; said Hanje and said Smith assignors to said Hunter Filed Apr. 22, 1957, Ser. No. 654,322 24 Claims. (Cl. 158-33) This invention relates to a fuel burning torch and particularly to a torch of this kind which has a portable fuel supply tank and detachably connected to it a burner tube, an extension tube, or both.

Liquid fuel burning torches are often used in countries where climatic conditions such as extreme cold make it necessary to use auxiliary heating aids in starting vehicles, airplanes, tanks and the like. Because, in military operations especially, speed is frequently very important, torches for these purposes must be capable of being readily brought into juxtaposition to the engines or other parts to be heated incident to the starting operations. Although other factors such as ruggedness, reliability and ease of repair figure prominently among the attributes desired in such torches, a high degree of flexibility of use is an advantage of great importance in such cases.

Circumstances are sometimes such that it is not practicable to bring the fuel reservoir or tank into close proximity to the object to be heated as, for example, where the size and weight of the reservoir make it awkward to hold the apparatus as a whole in a position in which the flame can play against some relatively inaccessible part. This is particularly true if the reservoir has a capacity much in excess of a quart, which is regarded as standard for a portable torch for military purposes. Under such circumstances, it is desirable to be able to interpose one or more extension tubes between the reservoir and the burner head or tube, permitting the reservoir itself to rest on the ground.

According to the present invention, the torch is so constructed that, if desired, the burner tube may be attached directly to the body block of the torch. On the other hand, the construction is such that one end of an extension tube may be applied to the body block in lieu of the burner tube, in which case the other end of the extension tube will ordinarily carry the burner tube. Two such extension tubes may be used in end to end relation, in which case the burner tube will of course be carried by the second extension tube. Interchangeability of the burner tube and extension tube or tubes is naturally a desideratum.

The manner of connecting the burner tube to the body block of the torch, or, if an extension tube is used, the manner of connecting the extension tube to such body block, must be such that the tube may be coupled and uncoupled with a minimum of delay. Frequently the saving of only a few minutes time in preparing a torch for use may make a great deal of difference in the military effectiveness of the vehicle, airplane or tank that it is desired to bring into operation. Therefore, it is virtually necessary that the coupling system employed for connecting the burner tube to the body of the torch, the extension tube to the body of the torch, or the burner tube to the extension tube be one characterized by simplicity and ease of engagement and disengagement.

With these considerations in mind, the invention provides a torch mixing block to which is coupled a burner tube or an extension tube for carrying .a burner tube.

To make this possible, the invention contemplates a mixing block with a coupling face that is substantially plane except where the coupling elements themselves project from it. The metering plugs, valviug elements and controls are so located that they are above or off to the sides of the coupling face. They can readily be reached in case it becomes necessaryto replace them, adjust the setting, or to make some other changes not directly aifecting the coupling system.

In the preferred form of the invention, as will appear, the coupling system makes use of studs projecting from the coupling face of the mixing block and, with them, of cooperating bayonet slots in a mounting base forming part of the burner tube or the extension tube, as the case maybe.

Although this use of the so-called bayonet joint has much to recommend it, largely because of its simplicity, sturdiness and ease of operation, the substitution of quick-attachable and quick-detachable joints of other types is not precluded. Apart from simplicity, sturdiness and ease of operation, an important consideration is the attachment and detachment of the component parts in a minimum of time. It is not so much the detailed construction of the coupling system as the presence or absence of the quick-attachable and quick-detachable feature that is decisive. Other joints possessing this advantage can therefore be expected to be used in the practice of the invention in lieu of the hereinafter described bayonet joint.

Other objects, advantages and features of the invention will be apparent from the description which 'follows and from the accompanying drawings, forming part of the specification, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a top plan of a liquid fuel burning torch 'incoiporating the invention;

FIG. 2 is anenlarged detail, partly in elevation, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, seen as if from line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged section through the control device, seen as if from line 3-3 of FIG. 2, with a central portion broken away to a greater depth;

FIGURES 4to 7 are sections online 4--4 of FIG. 3, the valviug element being in a different position in each case;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged end view of the nozzle in the burner tube, seen as if from line '88 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 9 is a section on line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is an end elevation of the mixing block and associated parts seen as if from line 1010 of FIG. 2, but with the burner tube removed to show the coupling face of the mixing block;

FIG. 11 is an end elevation of the coupling face of the burner tube on the same scale as FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing the burner tube detached from the mixing block;

FIG. '13 is a view comparable to FIG. 12 showing in detached position the end of an extension tube in lieu of the burner tube;

FIG. 14 is a view related to FIG. 13 showing the op posite end of the extension tube with the burner tube mounted in place;

FIG. 15 is a general side elevational view of a reduced scale showing an extension tube connecting the liquid fuel tank and the burner tube assembly;

FIG. 16 is an enlargement, partly in longitudinal section, of the burner tube assembly of FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is an end elevation substantially on line 17-17 of FIG. 16 and enlarged with respect to that figure;

FIG. 18 is an enlarged sectional detail seen as if from line .1818 of FIG. 16;

FIG. 19 is a, longitudinal section through the neck is afiixedto it by a set screw 32. V accommodating a coil spring 34 is provided by a counter-' bore in the mixing block 9, the spring being compressed reservoir or tank is designated 1. In torches of this type,

the tank top often has a flat area 2 flanked by downwardly inclined areas 3 and 4. The latter extend oppositely to each other, as appears from FIG. 3. On one of them, area 3 of FIG. 1, is located a pump 5 which projects into the interior of the tank for building up air pressure within the tank preparatory to starting the torch.

vOn area 4 are a pressure gauge 6 and a pressure relief valve 7. Extending horizontally and in vertically spaced relation above flat area 2 is a burner tube 8 attached to a vertically extended mixing block 9, seen to advantage in FIGURES 2 and 3,

Upper portion 11 of mixing block 9 is square in cross section, although it may, if desired, have a cross section of different shape. For convenience, lower portion 12 is of cylindrical cross section. A cylindrical adapter 13,

mounted in airtight engagement with the tank top, re- I ceives cylindrical portion 12. The latter is held in place by means of set screws IQ. As is apparent from FIG- URES 2 and 3, thereare, sealing means between cylindrical portion 12 and adapter 13, the same taking the form of an O-ring 14 held captive in a peripheral groove in cylindrical portion 12. When the parts are assembled in proper relation, the O-ring 14 helps prevent the escape of fluid, Whether air,-fuel,.or a mixture of the two, between the cylindrical portion 12 and the adapter 13.

Offset somewhat from the vertically extending longitudinal axis of mixing block 9 are two fluid-flow passages, one for air and one forfuel. These take the form of longitudinal bores 15 and 16 extending upward from the lower end of the mixing block. At such lower end, bottom face 19 of the mixing block 9 is flat except where the ends of bores 15 and 16 are respectively surrounded by circular recesses 17 and 18. Sealing means taking the form of O-rings 21 and 22 are located in recesses 17 and 18, respectively. These O-rings cooperate with and seal against upwardly directed flat surface 23 of a rotary valving element 24 located immediately below flat lower face 19 of the mixing block 9. The valving element 24 is cylindrical but of such shallow altitude that it may, if desired, be regarded as'a disk; It is aligned with cylindrical portion 12 of mixing block 9 and confined by the depending skirt of the adapter 13 within which it is received. Between valving element 24 and adapter 13 are sealing means 25, the same taking the form of an O-ring located in a peripheral groove in valving element 24. Ofiset radially from the longitudinal or vertical axis of valving element 24 and angularly spaced about such axis are two fluid-flow passages, the

' same taking the form of bores 26 and27 which by rotative movement of valving element 24 can be made to register with and constitute extensions of previously described bores 15 and 16.

From the flat lower face 29 of valving element 24, a

fuel supply tube 28 extends downward into the interior 7 A chamber 33 for between an internal shoulder 35 at the base of the spring chamber 33 and a shoulder 36 formed on valve stem 31 4 in the central zone of the mixing block at the juncture of the large and small diameter portions of the stem. Above the shoulder 36, large diameter portion 37 of the valve stem extends upwardly through and beyond the upper end of mixing block 9. To it is fastened valveactuating handle 38 which, as indicated in FIG. 1, is provided with indicia for registry with a fixed pointer 39 on the rear end of the burner tube 8.

With the torch out of operation and handle 38 in the 05 position shown in FIG. 1, valving element 24 is in the position illustrated by means of the dotted line representationof bores 26 and 27 in FIG. 4. With the parts in this relation to each other, the bores 26 and 27 are 7 .out of registry with recesses,17 and 18 at the lower end build up the air pressure in the tank.

When the torch is to be ignited, a mixture of air and fuel is supplied to the mixing block. Handle 38 is rotated to the extent necessary to bring bores 26 and 27 into alignment with recesses 17 "and 18, respectively. This state of affairs is represented in FIG. 6. It is also shown in FIG. 3, from which it will be apparent that both air and fuel can pass upwardly through valving element 24 into bores 15 and 16 in the mixing block. At this stage the torch can be ignited instantly in accordance with the principles described in prior application for patent Serial Number 457,803, filed September 23, 1954, in the names of Abe I. Hanje and Robert H. Hunter for Instant Flame Torch, now US. Patent 2,940,674, dated June 14, 1960.

As the torch operates, the pressure within the fuel storage tank 1 progressivelydecreases and it, becomes necessary to operate the pump 5 fron1 time to time to charge the'tank with an additional quantity of air to take the place of fuel and air released through the mixing block passages 15, 16 and the nozzle 75.

The pressure maintained within the fuel tank 1 governs the burning rate of the torch. Normallya pressure within the range of from about 40 pounds per square inch to about pounds per square inch is used. High combustion rates are obtained by maintaining pressures at the high end of such range and low combustion rates are obtained by maintaining fuel tank pressures at or toward the low end of such range. It is, of course, feasible to operate the torch using pressures lower than 40 pounds per square inch and higher than 60 pounds per square inch, mentioned as delineating the preferred range. When using the thermostatically controlled burner described in connection with FIGS. 15-20 the air supply to the nozzle is cut off by turning the control elements tothe fuel or gasoline only position shown in FIG. 7 as soon as the generator coil 116 is up to fuel vaporizing temperature. Thus with the thermostatic ar rangement depletion of the fuel tank airis eliminated. To extinguish the torch the fuel supply is cut otf and air under pressure is admitted to the mixing block 9 from 1 the tank 1. To accomplish this, the handle 38 is rotated to move the parts into the relative positions indicated in FIG. 5. Here there is a lack of registry between the fuel bore 27 and the inside of the O-ring 22 in the recess 18; on the other hand, there is at least partial registry betweenthe air bore 26 and the interior of the O-ring 21 seated in the recess 17. Thus air under pressure can pass through the air bore 26 in the valving element 24 into the recess 17 and the bore 15 in the mixing block 9 to snuff the flame. The handle 38 is then turned to off, closing the ports as in FIG. 4.

By means of stops (not shown) that limit rotative clockwise and counterclockwise movement of the handle 38, it is possible to confine rotation of the handle to an arc of not more than about 45. Thus when the handle has moved counterclockwise into the fuel only position illustrated in FIG. 7, sucha stop comes into operation to preclude further counterclockwise rotative moveaoensrs ment of the handle. Following reverse movement in the opposite or clockwise direction, a stop acts to detain the parts in the position of FIG. 4 and prevent the parts from assuming unintended positions. Movement of handle 38 may thus advantageously be limited to the range that intervenes between the extremes illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 7.

Referring now to FIG. 3, which shows the parts so related to each other as to permit both air and fuel to pass into the mixing block, it will be noted that bores 15 and 16 extend upward nearly to the top of the mix ing block. Short of the top they intersect a transverse opening 41 that extends through the mixing block from one side to the other. This opening is tapped at least at its ends to permit it to accommodate suitable means for metering the air, fuel, or mixture of air and fuel that at any given time is being supplied through the bores 15 and 16.

Metering plug 42 serves to control the dew of air arriving through bore 15. Among other, things, it is characterized by a hexagonal head 43, by an intermediate portion 44 of reduced diameter, and by a passage 45, all arranged as shown in FIG. 3. When metering plug 42 is in place in the threaded passage 41 in the mixing block 9 with head 43 hearing against the side of the mixing block, there is communication between the bore 15 and the metering passage 45 through the annular chamber which adjoins reduced portion 44. Metering plug 42 is representative, being interchangeable with other metering plugs of like shape in which the passage 45 is of smaller or greater diameter, as required to provide different air rates.

On the opposite side of the mixing block and axially aligned with the plug 42 is a metering plug 46 for controlling the flow of fuel admitted by way of the bore 16. Metering plug 46 has a hexagonal head 47 that seats against the side of the mixing block, an intermediate portion 48 of reduced diameter, and a fluid flow passage 49 arranged as shown. Bore 16 and the passage 49 communicate with each other through the annular space which surrounds reduced portion 48. Like metering plug 42, the metering plug 46 is interchangeable with other plugs having passages 49 of greater or lesser diameter as required to provide different fuel rates or to accommodate fuels of different viscosities.

Metering plugs 42 and 46 are of such length as to leave between them a mixing chamber 51, such chamber forming part of the transverse opening 41. To intercept the jets of fuel and air and thereby improve the mixing and to control the flow of fluid out of the mixing chamber 51, a third metering plug 52 is provided, the axis of which extends at right angles to the axis of metering plugs 42 and 46. Metering plug 52 is characterized by a hexagonal head 53, a threaded body portion 54 which fits into a correspondingly tapped opening in the upper end of the mixing block 9, and a tapered or needle valve end portion 55. The head of the metering plug 52 may seat on the mixing block 9, being replaceable, if needed, by a metering plug having a needle valve end portion of greater or lesser length, or the metering of thefiuid flow out of the mixing chamber may be regulated by screwing the plug 52 into and out of the threaded bore provided.

Below the needle valve end portion 55 a correspondingly shaped valve seat 56 is formed in the mixing block 9. A short vertical passage 57 connects the valve seat 56 with a transverse passage 58 that is tapped as shown in FIG. 2. Normally, valve 55 does not seat against valve seat 56, there being between the two an annular clearance of generally frustoconical shape. At the outer end of the transverse passage 58 is apertured jet fitting 59 through which the fuel or mixture of air and fuel proceeds out of mixing block 9. The fitting 59 is formed as shown and is threaded into the outer end of the transverse passage 58. On coupling face 61 of the mixing block to which the burner tube 8 is attached, the bluntly d apered nd po tion of the fit ing 59 p ci s for a distance out of the mixing block.

The coupling face 61 is generally flat but provided with means to which may be attached the proximate end of the burner tube or, if desired, the proximate end of an extension tube which may intervene between the mixing block and the burner tube. As appears from FIGURES 1 0 and '12, the coupling face 61 is provided with two suitably located parallel studs 62, one above and one below the fitting 59. Studs 62, normal to the block face 61, are headed as at 63. They are received in and engaged by a suitably formed and complementally apertured mounting base 64 which forms part of burner tube 8; see FIGURES 2 and 12. Mounting base 64 has a flat coupling face 65 adapted to mate with the coupling face on the mixing block.

The burner tube 8 is formed with an end flange or reduced diameter cylindrical portion 66 that bears endwise against a cooperating shoulder on the mounting base 64. The burner tube and mounting base are held together by drive screws shown in FIG. 11. Body portion 67 of the burningtube is provided with ports 63 for the inspiration of air. Mounting base 64 is provided with two arcuately curved bayonet slots 69 formed as indicated in FIG. 11 concentric to the axis of the jet fitting 59. When the burner tube 8 is to be attached to the mixing block 9, the wide portions of bayonet slots 69 are brought into juxtaposition to and alignment with the headed studs 62, after which the burner tube is urged against the mixing block. .Upon being rotated in the proper direction, the mounting base 64 becomes tightly engaged against the mixing block and interlocked with studs 62, the headed portions of the studs being engaged against the inside face of the mounting base 64.

It will be noted from FIGURES 2 and 12 that the mounting base or block 64 carries an G-ing 71 in a circular recess 72 that is located centrally of the coupling face 65. Extending forwardly from such recess is a short axial bore 73 which communicates with a tapped coaxial opening 74 of greater diameter. Screwed in place in the latter is a nozzle 75, seen also in FIGURES 8 and 9, having a generally hexagonal body portion 76. On one side thereof is a threaded attaching boss '77 provided with an axial bore 78. In body portion 76 is a hollow 79 the side walls of which are continued outwardly by a cylindrical thin shell extension 80 of the body 76 that is laterally apertured at 81; see FIGURES 8 and 9. Apertures 81 diametrically opposite each other admit air to the interior of the nozzle 75, where it combines with the fuel delivered to the burner tube.

Quick detachment of the burner tube 8 and quick attachment of the proximate end of an extension tube 85 in place thereof is an important advantage characterizing the bayonet joint making use of the studs 62 and the bayonet slots 69. In a typical case the extension tube 85 will consist, along with other pmts, of a flexible metal cable 86 enclosing a thin-walled metal tube 37. At the end of the extension tube 85, shown in FiG. 13, is a mounting base or block 88 that is generally similar to the previous described mounting base 64 at the end of the burner tube 8. It is provided with bayonet slots 89, similar to the bayonet slots 69, and has a flat coupling face 99 interrupted by a central recess 91 for the reception of O-ring 92.

Interiorly of recess 91 is an axial bore 93 which extends forwardly into and through a boss 94 that is formed integrally with the body portion of the mounting base 88. To the outside surface of the tube 85 is brazed a double tapered sleeve 95 that intervenes between the end of the externally threaded boss 94 and an interior flangelike part 96 of a special tubular end fitting 97; see FIG. 13. At its forward end, fitting 97 has a cylindrical hol low or counterbore 98 in which'flexible metal cable 86 is secured as by soldering, the other 9r rear end of the 7 fitting being internally threaded and screwed onto the boss 94.

' At the opposite end of the extension tube 85 is an end fitting 101 that is generally similar to the end fitting 97; see FIG. 14. End fitting 101 receives a threaded boss 102 that is formed as an integral part of a mounting base a I or block 103 which, at its outer end, has a flat coupling face from which project two studs 104, each headed as at 105. Centrally of the mounting base 103 between the studs 104 and coaxial with the externally threaded attaching boss 102 is an apertured fitting '106 that is similar to the fitting 59 '(FIG. 2). A bore 107 intervenes between the fitting 106 and the proximate end of the metal tube 87 projecting into a coaxial counterbore in the boss 102 from the extension tube 85. That end of the extension tube 85 of which the fitting 101 forms a part is surrounded by a hollow grasping member 108 of cylindrical tubular form afiixed as by drive screws to the mounting base 103 which it embraces. As appears from FIGURES and 16, the grasping member or handle extends rearwardly for a considerable distance sufiicient to provide a convenient hand hold, terminating in a portion 109 of reduced diameter which if desired may be fastened to metal cable 86. as by a set screw 110.

If, as in FIGURES 15 and 16, an extension tube intervenes between the tank and the burner tube, the latter maybe coupled to mounting base 103 in the manner shown in FIGURE 14. Provided that the studs 104 on the mounting base 103 are of the same length as and'disposed similarly to the'studs 620m the mixing block 9, the burner tube 8 may be attached to the mounting base 103 in the same manner in which it may be attached to the mixing block 9: compare FIGURES 2 and l4. Thus the burner tube 8 may be used in two ways, either directly on the mixing block 9 (FIGS. 1-3 and 12) or at the remote end of an extension tube which may be coupled to the mixing block 9, as indicated in a general way in FIGURES 13, 14.

FIGURE 15 shows a shielded burner head and tube of somewhat different construction from that of FIGURES 2, 11 and 12. The details are more clearly revealed in FIGURES 16 to 20,.inclusive. Not only is burnertube 112 shielded as by shroud 111 in the interests of more efiicient utilization of the flame, but it incorporates a generating system 115 by which the fuel may be preheated before beingadmitted to the nozzle. A burner of this general type is shown and described in prior application Serial No. 479,074, filed December 31, 1954, in the names of Robert H. Hunter, Abe J. Hanje and Harris W. Smith, now US. Patent 2,940,515, dated June 14,

The metal shroud or shield 111 is held to the burner tube 112 by screws 114 and consists of an upper portion 113a and a lower portion 113!) held together by brazing and which overlap as indicated at 1130 (FIG- URE 17). The generating system 115 includes a heater in the form of a helical tubular coil 116 at the discharge end of'the'burner tube 112 to which heater fuel is fed and from which it is withdrawn by metal conduits 117 and 118, respectively; These conduits are positioned on opposite sides of a bracket 119 that is fast to head block 130 that also receives the'neck of the burner tube. The manner of operation of coil 116, together with the role of the conduits 117 and 118, is described in the abovementioned prior application, Serial No. 479,074.

Bracket 119 incorporates a laterally offset forwardly extending portion 120 on which, underthe burning tube 112, is mounted a bushing 121 supporting a transverse pivot pin 122; see FIGURE 18. Attached to the opposite ends of'the pivot pin 122 to turn therewith are metal pods 1 23 and 124, in which are received and to which are soldered the'ends of the conduits 117 and 118. In order to adjust the position of the heater 116 of the generating system 115 with respect to the burner tube 112, a lever arm 125 is welded or otherwise secured at its rear side as the coupling face.

8 end to pivot pin 122; see FIGURE 18. At its free forward end, lever arm 125 carries a laterally extending portion 126 through which'passes an upwardly directed captive adjusting screw 127.

The upper end of the screw is held in a manner perrnitting rotation but not axial movement in a laterally extending horizontal flange portion 128 projecting from the offset portion of the bracket 119. When the screw 127 is turned, as by means of a screw driver, laterally extending portion 126 of the lever arm is caused to swing up or down, 'with. consequent rotative movement of the pivot pin 122, pods 123 and 124, and arcuate swinging movement of the flexible conduits 117 and 118. Thus the coil 116 is moved toward or away from the axis of the burner tube 112. The screw 127 extends downwardly through an opening in the shroud 111 so as to be accessible externally 'of the latter.

Extending rearwardly from the main or body portion of the burner tube 112 is a neck portion which is received about and made fast to a head block The latter is somewhat longer than the corresponding block 64 which carries the burner tube 8 of FIGURE 14. The head 130 is formed with arcuately curved bayonet slots 132 to receive either the studs 62 of the mixing block 9 or the studs 104 of the extension assembly block 103. The forward ends of the slots are milled or bored to a larger cross sectional area, as indicated at 133, in the provision of shoulders 134 engageable by the stud heads 63 or 105. The bayonet slots 132 are thus adapted to receive the studs on the coupling face of either the mixing block 9 or the mounting base 103 at the end of the extension tube 85. When the mounting blocks or bases 103 and 130 are coupled together, heads 105 on studs 104 bear against the shoulders 134.

Mounting base block 130 is further'provided with axial non-continuous bores 135 and 136 arranged as shown in FIGURES 19 and 20. The former receives fuel from the apertured fitting 106 at the near end of extension tube 85; the latter delivers it to nozzle 137. The two bores 135, 1 36 do not communicate directly with each other; instead, they are respectively connected to radial bores 138 and 139 which are axially spaced and disposed in diflferent axial planes. The bores138, 139 have enlarged outer ends in which are received tubes 141 and 142, that extend forwardly to the pods 123 and 124. The flow of fuel is from the fitting 106 to the bore 135 (rubber O-ring 187 sealing the joint) to bore 138 to tube .141 to pod 123 to the conduit 117 to the coil 116, where the direction of flow is reversed. Return flow is from the coil 116 to the conduit 118 to the pod 124 to the tube 142 to the radial bore 139 to axial bore 136 to the nozzle 137.

If circumstances make it desirable, burner tube 112 may readily be detached from the extension tube 85, this being done by simply taking grasping member 108 and the head block 130 in the hands and turning them in opposite directions to release the studs '104. Extension tube 85 may be detached from the mixing block 9 by a similar operation performed in the zone' in which the mounting base 88 of the extension tube 85 is coupled to the mixing block 9. Thereafter the burner tube 112 may, if desired, be applied to the mixing block 9 in place of the burner tube 8. Although the assembly comprising the burner tube 112 includes generating system 115, it may be coupled directly to the mixing block 9, being substitutable for the burner tube 8.

Thus the invention provides ways and means for coupling and uncoupling the mixing block 9 and the burner tube 8, for susbtituting for the latter the burner tube assembly 112 or, if desired, the extension tube 85. If the latter is used, either the burner tube 8 or the shielded burner tube 112 may be used with it. The mixing block itself is so designed that one of its sides is free of metering plugs and the like, thus permitting the use of this This becomes possible'as a result of locating the valving element at the bottom of the mixing block and locating the metering plugs above and to the sides of the coupling face.

In accordance with the patent statutes the principles of the present invention may be utilized in various ways, numerous modifications and alterations being contemplated, substitution of parts and changes in construction being resorted to as desired, it being understood that the embodiments shown in the drawings and described above are given merely for purposes of explanation and illustration without intending to limit the scope of the claims to the specific details disclosed.

What we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A control device for a fuel burning torch comprising a mixing block having a bore extending therethrough; a journaled valve stem therein and having two oppositely directed parts at least one of which projects out of the mixing block; grasping means outside the mixing block fast on a projecting part of the valve stem for turning the latter; a valving element fast on the other end of the valve stem and rotatable therewith relative to the block; said valving element and block being formed with confronting faces symmetric about the rotational axis of the stem; fluid flow passages in the valving element; fluid flow passages in the mixing block; the block and element passages terminating in ports opening through the confronting surfaces, the block and element ports being movable into and out of registry upon rotative movement of the element relative to the block; a mixing chamber in the mixing block in communication with said block fluid flow passages; and metering means mounted in the block for facile removal and replacement, said metering means being interposed between the block passages and the mixing chamber to control the flow of fluid into the mixing chamber.

2. A control device as in claim 1 in which the block is formed with an outlet passage ported to the mixing chamber and a needle valve is carried by the block in adjustable relation and projects across the mixingchamber to- Ward the outlet passage port. I

3. A control device as in claim 1. in which the metering means include metering plugs screwed into the block where the fluid flow passages communicate with the mixing chamber.

4. A control device for a fuel burning torch comprising a mixing block element having a bore extending therethrough; a stem in the bore and rotatable therein; a valving element on one end of the stem, said block and valving elements having confronting surfaces symmetrical about the stem axis; fluid flow passages in the valving element; fluid flow passages in the mixing block element; said passages opening through ports in the confronting surfaces, the valving element ports being movable into and out of registry with the block element ports upon rotation of the valving element relative to the block element; a mixing chamber in the mixing block in communication with said block fluid flow passages; an outlet passage in the block element and ported into the mixing chamber; and metering means controlling the flow of fluid into and out of the mixing chamber.

5. A control device as in claim 4 in which sealing means located between the confronting surfaces connect the fluid flow passages in the mixing block element to those in the valving element when the ports are registered.

6. In combination in a fluid fuel burning torch system, a tank for containing a fluid fuel and an overlying body of air under pressure; a block fast on the tank and formed with an internal mixing chamber, the block being formed with separate fuel and air passages communicating with the mixing chamber, conduit means connecting the fuel passage with the interior of the tank at the bottom of the latter for supplying pressurized fuel to the chamber, conduit means connecting the air passage with the interior of the tank at the top of the latter for supplying air under pressure to the chamber; metering means in each said 10 fuel and air passages to regulate the flow of fuel and 'air into the mixing chamber; a burner base block, a combustion tube mounted on the burner base block, a flexible conduit assembly connecting the burner base block to the mixing chamber block to receive mixed fuel and air from the latter; said conduit assembly comprising a flexible tubular conductor and receiving and delivering blocks on its opposite ends, connecting means comprising mating elements on the mixing and receiving blocks securing them together in face to face relation as a mating pair and for facile detachment and reconnection, the mixing and receiving bloc-ks being formed with passages opening through the meeting faces of the blocks in registered relation, such registered pasage in the mixing block extending to the mixing chamber to receive fluid fuel from the latter,

the registered passage in the receiving block extending to and being continuous with the passage in the conduit to deliver received fuel into the latter, nozzle means carried by the burner base block and disposed to project fuel into the combustion tube, connecting means comprising mating elements securing the delivering and burner base blocks together as a mating pair for facile disengagement and re-engagement, the delivering and burner base blocks having complemental meeting faces disposed against one another, the delivering and burner base blocks being formed with internal passages that register with one another in the plane of the meeting faces of the blocks, sealing means carried by one block of each of the pairs of mating blocks for establishing fluid seals between the blocks about the registered openings, and the mating element of the connecting means of the mixing block being complemental to the mating elements of both the receiving and the burner base blocks whereby upon disconnection of the receiving block from the mixing block and of the burner base block from the delivering block the burner base block is readily attachable to the mixing block for optional use of the system without the flexible conduit assembly, the registering passage in the burner base block being continuous with the registering passage in the mixing block upon connection of the burner base block to the mixing block.

7. A control device as in claim 1 in which the mixing block is formed with a fluid flow passage leading out of the mixing chamber and opening through the block in a discharge orifice.

8. A control device as in claim 1 in which the grasping means is provided with indicia for revealing the position of the valving element in relation to the mixing block.

9. A control device as in claim 5 in which at least one of the confronting surfaces is formed with at least one cylindrically walled recess surrounding one of the ports and the sealing means is located in such recess.

10. A control device as in claim 9 in which the sealing means takes a form of a resilient deformable O-ring circumferentially embraced by the cylindrical wall of the recess.

11. 'In a torch a control device comprising a block ele-' ment formed with an internal mixing chamber and fuel and air passages communicating with said chamber, a valve element, means mounting the valve element on the block element for relative rotative movement about a predetermined axis, said elements being formed with confronting juxtaposed surfaces movable rotatively one relative to the other upon relative rotation of the elements, said valve'element being formed with fuel and air passages opening individually through a pair of spaced ports in said surface of the valve element, said fuel and air passages in the block element opening individually through a pair of spaced ports in said surface of the block element, the fuel passage ports of the block and valve elements being disposed to register with one another while the air ports are out of communication in one relative position of the elements to communicate the block element fuel passage with the valve element fuel passage, the air passage ports of the block and valve elements being disposed to register with .oneanother while the fuel tween the elements and in all relative positions providing circular seals about one of the air ports and one of the fuel ports, means for mounting the block in non-rotative hermetically sealed relation on a tank adapted to contain liquid fuel and air under pressure and with the valve element exposed to the contents of the tank, a conduit connected to the fuel passage in the valve element and depending from the latter to extend into fuel contained in such a tank, the air passage in the valve element being open through the latter at a point exposed to air in such a tank whereby air and fuel therein are respectively supplied under pressure to the air and fuel passages of the valve element, a discharge passage in the block element leading out of the mixing chamber and opening through the block element at a point outside such a tank, means having connection with the valve element and actuatable to-rotate it and thereby selectively position the elements in any one of said one, other or third relative positions, and the block element having means for attachment thereto of means adapted to receive air, fuel or a fuel-air mixture from the opening of the discharge passage.

12. In a torch control device as set forth in claim 11 one of the confronting surfaces being formed with a circular recess having a bottom surrounding and constituting a terminus for one of the ports therein and said sealing means "comprising a'resilient deformable O-ring in said recess about such one port and making another circular contact with the other of the confronting surfaces, said O-ring being held captive in said recess whereby upon relative rotative movement of the elements said other circular contact of the O-ring migrates over and maintains contact with said other surface, and in one of the relative positions of the elements said other circular contact of the O-ring being in surrounding relation to another of the ports.

13. In a torch control device as set forth in claim 11 the surface of the block element being formed with circular recesses having bottoms surrounding the air and fuel ports of the block element, said sealing means comprising resilient deformable O-rings disposed one in each of said recesses, said O-rings each making one circular contact with the bottom of the recess in which it is disposed and about the port therein and each making another circular contact with the surface of the valve element, said recesses having cylindrical walls confining and holding captive the O-rings whereby during said relative rotative movement the G-rin'gs migraterover the surface of the valve element while maintaining said other circular contacts, and said other contacts of the O-rings being in surrounding relation to the fuel and air ports of the valve element when the elements are disposed respectively in said one and said other positions.

14. in a torch control device asset forth in claim 11 the mounting means comprising a tubular member having internal cylindrically surfaced portions, the block and valve elements being received within the tubular member and being formed with coaxial, cylindrical external surfaces surrounded by said surface portions of the tubular member on concentric relation, a pair of resilient deformable O-rings, one of said O-rings surrounding and sealing against the block element and the other surrounding and sealing against the valve element, and said O-rings each being in circular sealing contact with one of the cylindrical surface portions of the mounting member and sealing off the interface between the elements against ingress and egress of fluids.

15. In a torch the combination comprising a mixing block formed with a mixing chamber and having means defining a fluid passage in communication with the chamber; means carried by the block controlling the flow of fluid through the chamber; the mixing block having an external, substantially planar. coupling face formed with arid sourrounding an'outlet,the fluid passage extending betweenthe chamber and the face and being continuous with the outlet; a combustion tube assembly comprising a mounting base provided with a-substantially planar coupling face mating with thetcoupling face on the mixing block in confronting relation, a combustion tube secured to the base and providing 'a combustion chamber, nozzle means having a fuel orifice, the nozzle means being mounted on the base for projection of fuel from said orifice into the combustion chamber along a predetermined axis; said assembly including means defining a passage in the base having an inlet in and surrounded by the coupling face of the base; means coupling the combustion tube assembly to the block for facile removal and replacement, said coupling means being adapted to eifect said coupling with said inlet automatically registering with the outlet when the assembly is coupled to the block; and said base passage being adapted to receive fuel from said outlet and conduct the same under pressure to the nozzle means for said projection.

16. In a torch combination as defined in claim 15, said coupling means comprising on one of said block and base means defining a bayonet slot elongated circumferentially about the fuel projection axis and on the other of said block and base stud means receivable in such slot and disposed in generally parallel relation to such axis, and said slot defining means and aid stud means each being oriented in predetermined position about said axis whereby in so e 'fecting said coupling of the combustion tube asreceivable in the slots, the studs being parallel to and radially spaced from the axis, and said slots and said studseach being oriented in predetermined positions about said axis whereby in so effecting said coupling of the combustion tube assembly to the block seating of the studs in the'slot ends automatically locates the base in predetermined rotative position relative to the block.

' 18. In a torch combination as defined in claim 15, a resilient deformable cushioning and sealing annulus recessedtin one of the coupling faces in surrounding relation to one of the passages and adapted to be compressed in coupling the base to the block to seal the inlet and the outlet and to react againstthe hlockand base with a separating force,' and said coupling means being adapted to resist such separating force.

19. In a torch combination as defined in claim 15, the coupling faces being formed one with a recess and the other with a locating protuberance receivable in the recess in assembly, and said recess and protuberance being coaxial to one another and to the inlet and the outlet.

20. In a torch combination as defined in claim 15, the coupling faces being formed one with a recess and the other with a' locating protuberance receivable in the recess in assembly, said recess and protuberance being coaxial to one another and to the inlet and the outlet, and a resilient deformable sealing annulus disposed in the recess, said annulus being engaged and compressed by the protuberance in the coupling of the base to the block.

21. In a torch comprising a block element formed with a mounting face and an internal fuel passage, having an axis-normal to such face, the block element defining an outlet opening through said face and communicating with the passage, burner means for receiving and burning fuel discharged from the outlet, said burner means including a base element formed with a mounting face receivable against the face of the block element and, wholly supported by the base element, nozzle means having an orifice through which fuel received in the nozzle under pressure is projected along an axis which coincides with the axis of the block passage, said base element having an internal passage coaxial to the block passage and opening through its mounting face in the provision of an axial entry aligned with said outlet, the base element passage being continuous from the entry to the fuel projecting orifice, and quick detachable fastening means of separable parts carried, one by the block element and the other by the base element and holding the elements together for easy demounting and remounting of the burner means from and onto the block element, said fastening means being spaced radially from and symmetric about the outlet and the entry and being adapted automatically to align the entry with the outlet and to orient and retain the elements in predetermined rotative positions relative to one another about said axis.

22. In a torch as defined in claim 21 the fastening means comprising stud means fast to one of the elements and means on the other of the elements formed with arcuate slot means adapted to receive the stud means in captive relation to hold the elements against axial separation, and the stud means being engageable with the means having the slot means at the ends of the slot means to limit relative rotative movement of the elements.

23. In a torch as defined in claim 22 a resilient deformable sealing cushion disposed between the mounting faces of the elements in surrounding relation to said passage axis, said cushion being compressed in mounting the burner means on the block element to thereby effect a seal between the elements, and the compressed cushion reacting axially against the elements, loading the stud means axially and augmenting the friction between the parts of the fastening means.

24. In a torch the combination comprising a mixing block formed with a mixing chamber and a fluid passage in communication with the chamber; means carried by the block controlling the flow of fluid through the chamher; the mixing block having an external, substantially planar coupling face formed with and surrounding an outlet, the fluid passage extending between the chamber and the face and being continuous with the outlet; a combustion tube assembly comprising a mounting base provided with a substantially planar coupling face, a combustion tube secured to the base and providing a combustion chamber, nozzle means having a fuel orifice, the nozzle means being mounted on the base for projection of fuel from such orifice into the combustion chamber along a predetermined axis, said assembly including means defining a passage in the base having an inlet in and surrounded by the coupling face of the base, an extension tube assembly interposed between and connecting the mixing block and the combustion tube assembly, said extension tube assembly having on one end a supplemental base and on its other end a supplemental block respectively formed with substantially planar coupling faces mating with the coupling faces of the mixing block and of the mounting base in confronting relation to each, means interlocking the mixing block and the supplemental base for facile separation and reconnection, means interlocking the supplemental block and the mounting base for facile separation and reconnection, said supplemental base and said supplemental block being formed with connected passages and respectively with inlet and outlet openings in and surrounded by their respective coupling faces, the inlet and outlet openings of the supplemental base and the supplemental block being continuous with such connected passages and respectively registering with the mixing block outlet and the mounting base inlet automatically when the supplemental base is so reconnected to the mixing block and the mounting base is so reconnected to the supplemental block for conduction of fuel received in the chamber under pressure through the fluid passage of the mixing block, through the extension tube assembly and into the mounting base passage for such projection through the nozzle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 552,813 Brough Jan. 7, 1896 742,344 Myers Oct. 27, 1903 744,646 Tietz Nov. 17, 1903 1,082,619 Brasier Dec. 30, 1913 1,364,972 Andersone et al Jan. ll, 1921 1,427,606 Leahy Aug. 29, 1922 1,481,573 Van Brunt Jan. 22, 1924 2,416,964 Stull Mar. 4, 1947 2,473,435 Luzader June 14, 1949 2,604,114 Rogers et al July 22, 1952 2,794,447 Spitz June 4, 1957 2,809,101 Mitchell Oct. 8, 1957 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, 3,001 ,573 September 26, 1961 Robert H. Hunter et al.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 2, line 61, for "of" read on column 6, line 60, for "previous" read previously column 8, line 68, for "susbtituting" read substituting ,7 column 10, line 14, for "pasage" read passage -3 column 11 line 35, after "recess" insert said O-ring being axially confined between the elements, making one circular contact with the bottom of the recess line 66, for "on" read in column 12, line 6, for "sourrounding" read surrounding line 37, after "relative" insert to Signed and sealed this 25th day of December 1962 (SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST w. SWIDER DAVID LADD Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3574505 *Jun 23, 1969Apr 13, 1971Ronson CorpHeating unit for cooking
US6095801 *Jan 13, 1997Aug 1, 2000Spiewak; JohnFlexible torch assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/156, 137/625.41, 431/344, 431/209, 239/587.1
International ClassificationF23D14/28, F23D99/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23D21/005, F23D14/28, F23D2206/0036
European ClassificationF23D21/00B, F23D14/28