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Publication numberUS3002314 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1961
Filing dateJan 11, 1960
Priority dateJan 11, 1960
Publication numberUS 3002314 A, US 3002314A, US-A-3002314, US3002314 A, US3002314A
InventorsIrwin Brottman
Original AssigneeIrwin Brottman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rocket toy
US 3002314 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 3, 1961 l. BROTTMAN 3,002,314

Filed Jan. 11, 1960 (awn/@6 3,002,314 ROCKET TOY Irwin Brottrnan, 9113 Luella Ave, Chicago, Ill. Filed Jan. 11, 1960, Ser. No. 1,475 Qlaims. (Cl. 46-6) This invention relates generally to projectile-type toys and more particularly, is concerned with a toy of the character described which emits a visible trail simultaneously with the production of an audible sound while in flight so as to simulate an actual missile or rocket.

Projectile toys consisting of projectile-shaped bodies having means for manually propelling same through the air are well known in the art. However, to my knowledge, none of said toys have been capable of simulating the familiar characteristics usually identified with the operation of a genuine rocket device in that they fail to emit a vaporous trail and produce the characteristic whistle sound of such actual devices during flight.

Accordingly, it is the object of this invention to provide a projectile toy which is adapted to be propelled into flight and emit a vapor trail of bubbles and produce a whistling sound characteristic of actual missle or rocket devices when in flight.

A further object of the invention is to provide a toy as described having means for retaining a bubble-producing solution, said means also functioning asthe bubble producing means therein, said means comprising a group of selectively perforated discs disposed one alongside with the perforations of each misaligned, said group being selectively located on the toy so that flow of air through the toy will produce said bubbles at the rear or tail-end thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a toy as described having means for producing a whistling sound as the toy travels through the air, said means utilizing a portion of the flow of air through said device which has been diverted from passage through said bubble producing means.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a rocket simulative toy which is safe for children to operate, simple and economical to manufacture, and is sufficiently sturdy to withstand the wear and abuse encountered during the normal use of such toys.

Still other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description thereof ensues. A preferred embodiment thereof has been described in detail in the specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawing. It is contemplated that minor variations may be made in the arrangement, size, construction and proportion of the several parts thereof without departing from the scope or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rocket toy embodying the invention and illustrating the operation of same by a child.

FIG. 2 is an elevational View of said rocket toy in flight, a portion of the nose thereof being broken away to show details of structure.

FIG. 3 is a rear end view of said toy.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 44 of FIG. 2 and in the general direction indicated.

The invention herein is characterized by a hollow rocket shaped body, the tail of which may be dipped into a bubble-forming solution such as a soap solution. In flight, air passes up the center of the rocket and out through the tail end thereof. The tail end of the rocket body is provided with a group of perforated disc members the individual members of which are selectively arranged with their perforations misaligned. This enables 3,002,314 Patented Oct. 3, 1961 the retention of the bubble forming solution within the interstices thereof by capillary action. The rocket body is provided with fins or values adjacent the rear of said body, said fins each being curved in the same direction and in line therewith are provided openings in the body of said toy. Thus, a portion of the air passing through the body is diverted through the body openings to impinge upon the twisted fins and produce a whistling sound characteristic of the familiar sound associated with actual rocket devices in flight. The twist of the fins or vanes gives the rocket body a rotation as the stream of air passes thereover, said rotation tending to prevent the bubbleor tail end. Secured on' the circumferential surface ofthe body portion 12 adjacent end 16 are spaced stabilizing fin members 18 having a first portion 19 and a second portion 19, said first portion 19 being integral with said body portion 12 and perpendicular thereto, and said second portion 19 being twistedor bent at an acute angle relative the firstportion '19. Each of the fins 18 are circumferentially spaced apart on the body 12 equidistant one from the other. Openings 22 are provided in the hollow body 12, each opening being adjacent to the bend in a fin 18. The angle of bends of portions 19' is chosen so that air passing through openings 22 may impinge upon said bent portions thereby producing a whistling sound simulative of the jet noise of actual rocket or missile devices in flight.

Rearwardly extending from the tail end 16 of body 12 is disposed bubble solution retainer means 24 comprising a plurality of disc members 26 each having openings or perforations 28. These disc members 24 are placed adjacent and slightly spaced one from the other as shown in FIG. 4. The said discs 24 are disposed so that the perforations 28 are purposely misaligned relative one the other. Each of the discs may have a diameter progres sively becoming smaller in matching the progressively reduced diameter of wall 15 of the base portion 16.

It is contemplated that the group of discs also may be set into the body of the rocket toy as shown in FIG. 4, or may be a preformed body wherein the individual .disc members are disposed one on the other so that their perforations are misaligned, and then secured together, the grouping then being attached or secured by adhesive means to the tail end of the body 12.

The first step prior to propelling the rocket. toy into flight is to place the tail end of the rocket body into a container wherein a bubble forming solution such as soapy water or the like has been placed. This process is illustrated in phantom in FIG. 1 wherein the small container 21 is shown. Herein is shown the rocket 10" in phantom outline being held tail down into a bubble forming solution. The solution is absorbed into the interstices formed by the misaligned perforations 26 in said discs 24 by capillary action and is retained therein by said action. The rocket toy 10 is then ready to be launched.

To launch the rocket toy 12, the child may utilize a sling 30 as illustrated in FIG. 1. The sling 30 comprises a handle 32 to which is secured a rubber band 34 of suflicient elastic strength to withstand elongation several times its length. The child grasps the handle 32 in one handle and places either the hook 15 provided or tail end 16 of the predipped rocket toy so that it is cradled in the bight 36 of the rubber band 34, firmly grasping the body 12 of the rocket, and with the nose of the rocket pointed 3 outward and upward, the child draws the rocket toward himself, while holding the handle 32 in place, still keeping same in position. Thus tension is exercised on the band. When the childs grasp on the rocket is released, the rocket is immediately propelled into flight.

In flight, air flows through the body 12 of the rocket entering same at the opening in the nose end 14 and passing therethrough. The impingement of air upon the twisted or bent portions =19 of the stabilizing fins 18 cause the rocket body to twist in a rotational movement as indicated by the arrow in FIG. 1.

The air passing through the body 12 is partially diverted through openings 22, the flow of air therethrough causing a decrease of pressure on the discharge end which might otherwise break up the bubbles. Variations in the size of the openings 22 and other dimensions can be made for the best results and optimum size of bubbles. The flow of air through openings 22 also causes a whistling sound which is heightened by being in the vicinity of the vanes- 19 and 19'. The remaining portion of the air flow passes throughthe perforations of the discs which comprise the bubble solution retainer means and thence through the opening in the base end 15. In this manner a shower of bubbles is produced as the rocket travels along its flight path through the air bubble so long as solution remains in the device.

It should also be noted that the rotational action of the rocket as it travels through the air results in a centrifugal action upon the fluid solution within the retaining means 24 so that same is prevented from settling to the bottom of said means and flowing out from the end thereof. a

The particular configuration of the hollow body 12 is relatively unimportant, and would be expected to follow the particular configuration of a full scale model of whichever rocket or missile the toy is intended to simulate.

It is further contemplated that the entire body 12 including the fins 18 may be molded to any individual rocket or missile configuration with the disc members 26 being inserted or attached in the manners described. It is further contemplated that even said disc members may be molded inthe same molding operation as body portion 12.

In FIGS. 2 and 4 an annular ring or grasping flange 40 is shown to enable the user to grip the rocket at its rear end during launching. This may be in the form of ridges or other continuous or intermittent protuberances or may be omitted entirely as in FIG. 3. Considerable variations in details are possible without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined in the claims.

I claim:

1. A rocket toy comprising, an elongate, substantially cylindrical body simulating the configuration of an actual rocket device, said body being hollow and open at both ends thereof, a plurality of outwardly extending stabilizer fins secured to said body at one end thereof, bubble producing means disposed at said one end comprising perforated discs arranged side by side with the perforations thereof at least partially misaligned, said means adapted to absorb and retain a bubble-forming solution after immersion therein of said one end whereupon a flow of air through said means will produce a wake of bubbles simulating a vapor trail during flight of the toy.

2. A rocket toy comprising, an elongate substantially cylindricalbody, said body being hollow and open at both ends thereof, a plurality of outwardly extending stabilizer fins secured to said body equidistant one from the other at one end thereof, each of said fins having a portion thereof bent at an acute angle relative said unbent portion of said fins, at least one opening in said body adjacent at least one of said fins nearest saidone end of said body whereby air passing through said body is partially diverted through said openings to produce an audible whistling sound during flight of the toy, and bubble producing means adapted to absorb and retain a bubble forming solution therein upon immersion of said one end whereupon flow of air through said means will produce a plurality of bubbles simulating the vapor trail of an actual rocket device during flight, said bubble producing means comprising at least a pair of perforated disc members arranged side by side with the perforations thereof at least partially misaligned.

3. A rocket toy as described in claim 2 wherein there is provided means thereon for grasping one end of a rubber band sling for propelling said toy into flight, said means comprising a hook disposed on said rocket body adjacent said opposite end.

4. A rocket toy comprising, an elongate substantially cylindrical body, said body being hollow and open at both ends thereof, a plurality of outwardly extending stabilizer fins secured to said body equidistant one from the other at one end thereof, each of said fins having a portion thereof bent at an acute angle relative said unbent portion of said fins, at least one opening in said body adjacent at least one of said fins nearest said one end of said body whereby air passing through said body is partially diverted through said opening to produce an audible whistling sound during flight of the toy, and bubble producing means adapted to absorb and retain a bubble means comprising at least two perforated disc members disposed within said hollow body at said one end thereof, said disc members disposed side by side along the horizontal axis of said hollow body covering said one end, said disc members disposed so that the perforations thereof are at least partially misaligned, said one end of said rocket toy being adapted to be dipped into a solution of bubble-forrning material whereupon said solution is absorbed and retained within the interstices of said discs perforations, and the said rocket being then propelled into flight, whereby the flow of air through said body during flight produces aplurality of bubbles simulating the vapor trail of an actual rocket device.

5. A rocket toy adapted to be projected into flight and comprising an elongate hollow tubular body member open at both ends, a plurality of outwardly extending fins secured to said body at one end thereof, and bubble producing means disposed at said one end, said means adapted to absorb and retain therein a bubble forming solution after immersion of said one end into said solution whereby the amount of solution absorbed and retained will produce a wake of bubbles simulating a vapor trail upon passage of a flow of air therethrough during the flight of the toy, said means comprising tortuous capillary air path forming structure, at least two discs, each having a plurality of perforations therein, saiddiscs being arranged with their perforations at least partially misaligned thereby forming said tortuous capillary air path.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,298,425 Shafler Oct. 13, 1942 2,305,382 Hagopian Dec. 15, 1942 2,621,441 Worden Dec. 16, 1952 2,805,515 Gans et a1. Sept. 10, 1957 2,826,860 Ashley et al Mar. 18, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 13,268 Netherlands June 15, 1925 UNITED STATES PATENT. OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, 1x002551 1 Qictober 3, 1961 I I Irwin Brottman I It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below Column 4 line 57 after "structure insert in which said structure comprises Signed and sealed this 27th day of February 1962.

(SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST W. SWIDER 7 DAVID L, LADD Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2298425 *Sep 8, 1941Oct 13, 1942Shaffer George WToy glider
US2305382 *Jun 18, 1941Dec 15, 1942Hagopian Charles HBubble pipe
US2621441 *Dec 1, 1948Dec 16, 1952Worden Floyd OWhistling toy aerial projectile
US2805515 *Jan 10, 1956Sep 10, 1957Gans Jerome TBubble emitting toy
US2826860 *Oct 29, 1956Mar 18, 1958Ashley Lawrence FFlying saucer toy
NL13268C * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3191813 *Apr 23, 1962Jun 29, 1965Cooke Engineering CompanyLaboratory apparatus
US3395481 *Mar 10, 1966Aug 6, 1968Elizabeth H. GallowayToy for forming bubbles
US3600842 *Jul 16, 1969Aug 24, 1971Bryman HaroldBubble-producing glider toy
US3665637 *Dec 11, 1970May 30, 1972Starr IrvingBubble pipe toy
US4184284 *May 30, 1978Jan 22, 1980Rogahn Dino JBubble producing flying toy
US4299049 *Feb 11, 1980Nov 10, 1981Mattel, Inc.Shape-simulating toy
US5041042 *Dec 19, 1989Aug 20, 1991David SteinFlying bubble toy
US5071382 *Jul 27, 1990Dec 10, 1991Richard SanfordModel airplane bubble
US5078636 *Mar 20, 1990Jan 7, 1992Clarke William ABubble maker with top reservoir on a glider
US5156564 *Jun 10, 1991Oct 20, 1992Hasegawa Gary KToy bubble-forming missile-like device
US5299966 *Feb 22, 1993Apr 5, 1994Rose Iii Thomas MProjectile toy apparatus
US5306191 *Apr 19, 1993Apr 26, 1994Phillips Charles BCylindrical aerodynamic toy with ballast rings
US5393256 *Feb 7, 1994Feb 28, 1995M.R.L. Manufacturing, Inc.Flying bubble-producing toy and method
US5620351 *Feb 6, 1995Apr 15, 1997Well Skill Industrial Ltd.Bubble toy
US5695379 *Nov 30, 1995Dec 9, 1997Well Skill Industrial Ltd.Bubble producing toy
US5830029 *Apr 2, 1997Nov 3, 1998Siegel; Richard BryanToy bow-in-arrow bubble shooter system
US6345676Feb 7, 2000Feb 12, 2002Mattel, Inc.Bubble-producing ride-on vehicle
US6408967Jul 31, 2000Jun 25, 2002Mattel, Inc.Bubble-producing ride-on vehicle
US20130037012 *Aug 10, 2011Feb 14, 2013Douglas M. GausToy for flinging missile or other projectile
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/15
International ClassificationA63H27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H27/005
European ClassificationA63H27/00D