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Publication numberUS3002398 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1961
Filing dateOct 20, 1958
Priority dateOct 20, 1958
Publication numberUS 3002398 A, US 3002398A, US-A-3002398, US3002398 A, US3002398A
InventorsBeamer Ralph R
Original AssigneeBeamer Ralph R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote controlled steering device for outboard motors
US 3002398 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. R. BEAMER Oct. 3, 1961 REMOTE CONTROLLED STEERING DEVICE FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Filed Oct. 20, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet l RALPH R. BEAMER INVENTOR.

BY ri Z R. R. BEAMER Oct. 3, 1961 REMOTE CONTROLLED STEERING DEVICE FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Filed Oct. 20, 1958 W 0E Q ,MM IT 5 m o mm H w m M R. R. BEAMER Oct. 3, 1961 REMOTE CONTROLLED STEERING DEVICE FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Filed Oct. 20, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG .4

) O o Q Q FIG RALPH R. BEAMER INVENTOR.

ilniteti Snares Fatent O 3,002,398 REMOTE CONTROLLED STEERING DEVICE FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Ralph R. Beamer, 15919 25th Ave., SW., West Seattle, Wash. Filed Oct. 20, 1958, Ser. No. 768,371 4 Claims. (63!. 74-512) This present invention relates to the general art of devices intended for controlling the direction of applied output of an outboard motor and more particularly to a device formed of two separate coacting units which are connected by a flexible push-pull shaft. One portion of the device is anchored to the transom of the boat, preferably by the mounting screws that hold the outboard motor on the boat. This device has arrangements for engaging the steering handle of the outboard motor. A control of this linkage is provided by the sheathed flexible cable. The remote control unit of the device is arranged to accept the flexible shaft and permit the actuation of the shaft by means of a foot treadle.

With the tremendous development of the outboard motor as a means of recreation and particularly for fishing, a large number of boat designs have been perfected. Especially on the larger boats, there is employed a Watertight motor well to the end that particularly in following seas, a wave that would normally tend to break over the transom and flood the boat will be confined. This arrangement adds materially to the safety of a boat in rough water. This motor Well arrangement is in effect a second transom and raised floor between the outboard motor and the passenger space of the boat. Arrangements of this order, however, provide decking over on the sides of the motor well or platform and this makes it very diflicult to control the smaller outboard motors used so much for fishing. This is due to the fact that the outplate under the clamps as shown in FIGURE 3.

board motor is so often secured to a bracket rearwardly of the transom of the boat and then to have to reach over the decked over space means that the fisherman must reach backward to a point that is uncomfortable and often places him in a precarious position. My present invention is to provide means for very convenient handling of an outboard motor under these conditions and to free the hands of the fisherman.

The principal object of this present invention therefore is to provide a remote control means wherein the control portion where the steering effort is applied can be placed forwardly at considerable distance from the motor. This tends to give a better balance of the boat and avoids the squatting of the stern of the boat.

A fuither object of this invention is to provide a control means for handling the actual steering of the out boat motor which is secured in the immediate vicinity of the motor and is connected by a flexible cable to a more forwardly positioned foot or wheel controlled unit.

A further object of this present invention is to provide a two part control arrangement for steering an outboard motor which makes it possible to selectively employ a foot for steering with a treadle conveniently placed on the floor of the boat, and then as an alternate to give a more restful change of position, the device may be hung on a couple of screws or bolts suitably secured in the hull of the boat and a conventional type of steering wheel employed.

A further object of this invention is to employ a two part steering arrangement that is very compact and light in weight which can be carried with the outboard motor and used without any permanent attachment to a boat, as a rented boat for instance.

Further objects, advantages and capabilities will be apparent from the description and disclosure in the drawings, or may be comprehended or are inherent in the device.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view showing in a fragmentary or broken away arrangement, the employment of my two piece outboard motor control.

FIGURE 2 is an illustrative perspective View showing the remotely positioned linkage, the base and foot treadle for the same, in the angular disposition'most commonly used in steering an outboard motor.

7 FIGURE 3 is a perspective view illustrating the linkage arrangement used to make it possible to steer the outboard motor by means of a flexible push-pull cable.

FIGURE 4 illustrates the device shown in FIGURE 3 in which the base member is secured to a vertical bulkhead or framing in the boat thus permitting the use of a conventional type of steering wheel.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary view showing the manner in which my steering arm is operatively connected to the handle of an outboard motor, the handle being shown in dashed lines.

FIGURE 6 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 3.

Referring to the drawings, throughout which like reference characters indicate like parts, the numeral 10 designates the anchor plate to which my actual steering linkage is secured. However, in order to employ this device in its preferred form giving extreme portability, the anchor plate 10 is preferably formed as a channel and with the base pivot support barsas 14 and 16 fixedly secured thereto. This makes it possible to employ the clamps 17 of the outboard motor, which normally secure the motor to the transom of a boat to include this anchor This places plate 10 in its most desirable position for use and if a plurality of pointed bosses 18 are provided which will bite into the wood of the transom, the plate will not only hold plate It? in place but will also give added security against the loss of the outboard motor itself. Arms 14 and 16 are of different lengths, 14 being considered to be the long bar and 16 the short bar and this arrangement is desirable in that it gives better placement ofthe pivots 20 and 22.

Pivot 22 is in effect the anchor for the end of the flexible cable 24. This cable is provided with a sheath portion 26 and a reciprocating core 28. Push-pull cables of this order are a common article on the market, the sheath 26 making it possible to extend the core member 28 or to retract it. Controlling means such as this has been developed originally for automotive use but now in various sizes is generally applied Where it is desirable to provide rectilinear movement for a limited extent and at a remote point. The removable core 28 of cable assembly 24 is attached to a pivot block 30. Block 30 is pivotably secured to an intermediate lever 32, which is in turn pivotably supported and positioned on the adjustable pivot 20. Lever 32 is provided with a plurality of spaced pivot holes 34 adapted to accept the pivot pin 36 which secures the steering arm 38 in 'a pivotable arrangement to lever 32. A preferred form of structure is to bifurcate the end of bar 38 as at 40.

Bar 38 is provided with a plurality of ring bearing openings 42.. These are provided so that the outboard steering handle engaging ring 44, which is provided normally with a vertical spindle 46 may be placed in any of the openings so that the plane of ring 44 can readily adjust itself as necessary as the steering handle of the outboard motor swings in an are which normally is inclined from the horizontal. In order to insure quick detachment of the motor from this equipment, the bearing shaft 46 should be provided with some quick operating holding means such as the safety pin arrangement indicated at 48. It is very desirable to point out that pivots 20 and 22 should be vertically adjustable so that pivot blocks 30 and 31 may work smoothly and without undue angularity. The relationship between steering bar 38 and intermediate lever 32 should be such that there will always be sufficient angularity between core 28 and lever 32 and between lever 32 and steering arm 38 so that the system can never be placed in an aligned position where they would be self locking as this would defeat the certainty and ease of control desired from the flexible cable 24.

Referring to FIGURE 2 the arrangement of my power input unit is shown. The device is shown as it is most commonly used in fishing, where foot pressure applied to treadle 50 is imparted by suitable linkage to cable 24 and through cable 24 to the linkage disposed at the motor which is shown in FIGURE 3. As an alternate arrangement the input of power to the device as shown in the arrangement of FIGURE 4 may be employed. Except for the addition of the steering wheel 52 and its positioning nut 54 the power input mechanism is identical, it being desirable to have the two possible operational arrangements just as a matter of relief or convenience to the user. Referring to FIGURE 2, the power input device is provided with a base plate 60. This plate may be screw fastened to the floor of the boat itself or a more preferred arrangement is to fasten the metal base plate 69 to a piece of plywood or the like which will be large enough so that it will provide adequate stability to the base while the treadle St is being operated and yet will not be so big that it will be clumsy and cumbersome in the transportation of the device. Fixedly secured or formed as part of base plate 60 is the end bracket member 62 and at the opposite end of the base plate the bearing support bar 64.

The end bracket 62 is provided with a plurality of mounting holes 66, which are preferably of the keyhole or bayonet type having a lower enlarged portion capable of being passed over the head of a screW and an upper slotted portion of a size to fit the body proper of the screw under the head so that an effective mounting is obtained for end bracket 62 and the associated assembly as illustrated in FIGURE 2. End bracket 62 and support bar 64 provide bearings for the treadle shaft 70. The treadle 50 has a foot engaging portion 72 to which nonskid pads 74 are secured. Underneath treadle plate 72 and substantially centrally disposed is the supporting bearing 76 for the treadle which may be fixedly secured to shaft 70 by pin 77. Means are further provided to insure that shaft 70 will not be displaced longitudinally and this may be provided by employing short sleeves as 78 and 79 which will etfectively prevent the longitudinal movement of shaft 70, as will be believed apparent from a study of FIGURE 2. Fixedly secured to shaft 70 is the shaft operating arm 80. This arm has pivotably secured at 82 an anchor block 84 adapted to secure the end of core 28. Core 28 is guided by the cable sheath 26 and a metal extension thereof 29, which is secured in the pivoted block 88 which in turn is pivotably secured to an upstanding bearing member '89. Aside from the convenience of having cable 24 raised above the floor of the boat, it is very essential that the height of bearing member 89 and the length of arm 80 be balanced against the maximum movement of core 28 to the end that no binding will occur in the end of core 28 which might place undue friction on the unit or cause ultimate breakage of the core.

In FIGURE 4, an alternate mounting of the power input equipment is provided. This arrangement uses the equipment shown in FIGURE 2 and in addition a steering wheel 52 which is secured to the squared shaft end 53 of shaft 7ft by acorn nut 54. In this arrangement all the necessary working parts are maintained in exactly the same relationship as shown in FIGURE 2 so that the device may be employed in the bottom of the boat while fishing and then for possibly a long trip home, the entire mechanism can be picked up, the wheel attached, and the end bracket member 62 simply hung on previously anchored screws 63 which pass through the bayonet slot 4. openings 66 of bracket 62. When so mounted it will be apparent that the functioning of all the various parts is undisturbed and all are used except the actual treadle 50. This treadle is however left in place so that the Whole unit can be quickly taken off the wall or bulkhead and placed on the floor for operation.

In FIGURE 5, I have illustrated a desirable connecting means between the steering arm 38 and the handle of the outboard motor H. In this arrangement ring 44 is passed over the end of handle H and secured in place by spaced resilient washers of considerable thickness illus trated at 45 and 47. Normally washer 45 must be placed over the handle before ring 44 is engaged and then washer 47 is slipped over the handle to complete the attachment. Washers 45 and 47 should be quite resilient so that they can be easily slipped on and oflf of handle H, it being apparent, it is believed, that to disconnect steering bar 38 from the handle it is necessary to be able to quickly move the outer washer 47. It is to be noted that washers 45 and 47 determine the plane of ring 44, which at all times will be at right angles to the axis of handle H.

It is believed that it will be clearly apparent from the above description and the disclosure in the drawings that the invention comprehends a novel construction of a remote controlled steering device for outboard motors.

Having thus disclosed the invention, I claim:

1. A portable, remote control means for outboard motors, comprising: a steering linkage for engaging an outboard motor to partially revolve it about its vertical axis; said linkage having an anchor plate of elongated channel form adapted to be secured to a motor mount and position two forwardly extending pivot supporting arms at different lengths and having pivot receiving openings adjacent their ends; an intermediate lever pivoted to the longer of said pivot support arms, said lever having means for adjustably positioning its pivot and for linkage elements secured thereto; a steering arm pivotably secured, at one end, to said intermediate lever by adjustable positioning means provided by said lever; and outboard motor steering handle engaging ring adjustably and pivotably positioned on said steering arm; a power input device for coaction with said steering linkage having a substantially horizontal base plate; an elongated end bracket member secured to one end of said base plate and having spaced openings adapted to engage mounting screws for supporting said input device above the floor of a boat; a bearing supporting bar at the opposite end of said base plate, said supporting bar and said end bracket member adapted to revolvably position a treadle shaft above said base plate; a foot operated treadle fixedly secured to said treadle shaft; a cable operating arm also fixedly secured to said treadle shaft; a flexible push-pull shaft disposed for operatively connecting said steering linkage and said power input device; said flexible shaft having a core and an enclosing sheath adapted to have the ends of both the core and sheath positioned to accommodate the range of movement required to permit the transfer of power from the power input device to said steering linkage; pivoted anchor means for the end of said reciprocating flexible shaft core secured to said operating arm; a pivoted guide block means for said flexible cable core; and an upstanding bearing member secured to said bearing support bar for pivotably supporting said guide means associated with said guide block for adjustably anchoring the sheath of said flexible cable.

2. A portable steering means for outboard motors, comprising: a steering linkage, having means for operatively engaging the steering handle of an outboard motor; an anchor plate which forms the base member from which the various parts of the linkage are supported, said anchor plate adapted to be secured to an outboard motor support by the transom clamp screws of an outboard motor; a power input device for coaction with said steering linkage having a substantially horizontal base plate, a Vertically positioned end bracket member secured to said base plate and a flexible shaft, of the push-pull type, having a reciprocating core and an enclosing sheath, for joining said steering linkage and said power input device to facilitate steering an outboard motor from a position remote from the motor; said steering linkage comprising an anchor plate having two substantially horizontal pivot support bars of unequal length; an intermediate lever supported by the longer bar; a pivot adjustable for height adapted to pivotably position said intermediate lever above said longer bar; a plurality of openings in said lever to adjustably position linkage that is pivotably secured to said lever in order to adapt said linkage to steering a wide range of outboard motors; a steering arm pivotably secured to one end of said intermediate lever by a pivot pin passing through one of a plurality of openings adjacent the end of said lever; a ring for operatively engaging an outboard motor steering handle; resilient washers disposed on the steering handle of an outboard motor, one on each side of said ring, to position it on said handle; a block secured to the end of said flexible shaft core and pivotably secured to said intermediate lever on the end opposite the steering arm; a second block pivotably mounted on the shorter pivot support bar and adapted to adjustably secure the sheath of said flexible shaft.

3. A portable steering means for outboard motors, comprising: a steering linkage, having means for operatively engaging a straight, tubular, forwardly extending steering handle of an outboard motor; an anchor plate from which the various parts of the linkage are supported, said anchor plate adapted to be secured to an outboard motor support by the transom clamp screwsof an outboard motor; a power input device for coaction with said steering linkage having a substantially horizontal base plate; a vertically positioned end bracket member secured to said base plate and a flexible shaft, of the push-pull type, having a reciprocating core and an enclosing sheath, for joining said steering linkage and said power input device to facilitate steering an outboard motor from a position remote from the motor; said power input device comprises, a treadle shaft revolvably supported from said base plate; a single foot operated treadle fixedly secured to said treadle shaft; a shaft operating arm fixedly secured to said treadle shaft and having means pivoted at its upper end to operatively engage the input end of said flexible shaft core; pivoted means supported by said base plate for adjustably securing the input end of the sheath of said flexible shaft.

4. The subject matter of claim 2 in which said power input device has a horizontally disposed treadle shaft revolvably supported from said base plate; a shaft operating arm secured to said treadle shaft at right angles thereto; a steering wheel detachably secured to said shaft at the end furthest removed from said end bracket memher and means for operativel'y positioning said device, by means of said end bracket, at a convenient operating height to facilitate hand steering of an outboard motor.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,469,258 Geistert Oct. 2, 1923 2,875,722 Post Mar. 3, 1959 2,881,730 Hall Apr. 14, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 401,820 Germany Sept. 9, 19-24

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1469258 *Apr 3, 1920Oct 2, 1923Gen Motors CorpClutch and brake lever supporting bracket
US2375722 *Sep 15, 1942May 8, 1945Gen ElectricCarrier-current control system
US2881730 *Apr 29, 1955Apr 14, 1959Hall Thane RBoat steering device
DE401820C *Mar 8, 1924Sep 9, 1924Max MichaelVorrichtung zum Legen des Ruders von Motorbooten
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3475985 *Apr 5, 1967Nov 4, 1969Oldham Albert HOutboard motor control
US3598079 *Oct 6, 1969Aug 10, 1971Cudley Marvin ABoat steering system
US3641962 *Jul 7, 1969Feb 15, 1972Fo Mac Enterprises IncSteering device for boats
US3901099 *Sep 28, 1973Aug 26, 1975Delaney Bernard JOperating control interchanger for two stations
US4143436 *Mar 4, 1977Mar 13, 1979Jones Roy EDirectional control mechanism for a trolling motor
US4262618 *Aug 22, 1979Apr 21, 1981Vanderzee William PRemote control steering attachment for a steering wheel
US4295385 *Jan 21, 1980Oct 20, 1981Huttenhow George HPivoted lever actuator
US4569663 *Jan 12, 1984Feb 11, 1986Miller Darrell GSteering control for trolling motor
US4631033 *Apr 23, 1984Dec 23, 1986Johnson Fishing, Inc.Outboard motor foot control with adjustable cables
US4631034 *Apr 23, 1984Dec 23, 1986Johnson Fishing, Inc.Outboard motor foot control
US4645462 *May 17, 1985Feb 24, 1987Fulton Hubert STrolling motor guide
US4766776 *Sep 15, 1987Aug 30, 1988Brunswick CorporationSingle cable shift assembly
US4919629 *Feb 1, 1988Apr 24, 1990Sanshin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaSteering device for marine propulsion
US5865068 *Sep 15, 1997Feb 2, 1999Huntley; William F.Foot operated motor control
US6058796 *Jan 19, 1999May 9, 2000Huntley; William F.Footed operated motor control
US7967650Sep 20, 2010Jun 28, 2011Perfect Outdoor Products, LlcTension sleeve system for electric trolling motors
US20110076903 *Sep 20, 2010Mar 31, 2011Laabs Edward AnthonyTension sleeve system for electric trolling motors
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/512, 74/487, 74/552, 74/480.00B, 114/153, 440/63, 74/494, 74/560, 440/62
International ClassificationG05G7/00, B63H20/00, B63H20/12, G05G7/10
Cooperative ClassificationG05G7/10, B63H21/265
European ClassificationB63H21/26B, G05G7/10