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Publication numberUS3003284 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1961
Filing dateApr 15, 1959
Priority dateApr 15, 1959
Publication numberUS 3003284 A, US 3003284A, US-A-3003284, US3003284 A, US3003284A
InventorsSmithers Vernon L
Original AssigneeV L Smithers Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compote for floral arrangements
US 3003284 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1961 v. L. SMITHERS 3,003,284

COMPOTE F OR FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS Filed April 15, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR VERNON L. SMITHERS ATTORNEYS Oct. 10, 1961 v. L. SMITHERS COMPOTE FOR FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 15, 1959 FIG. 3

FIG.4

ATTORNHS nited States Patent The invention relates to tan artisticyet practical support for a variety of floral arrangements, andcomprises an interior body of moisture-retentive foam for receiving the stems of flowers and 'supported'w-ithin a container designed to .cooperate'avithsaid block'and stemsin maintaining a desired'fioral arrangement. vIMore specifically,

the invention relates to an ornamental compote. for vfloral arrangements used as centerpieces, table decorations,

floral displays and the like.

The novel device makes it possible for the florist or arranger to create attractive arrangements well in advance of the display time, and-to be sure the flowers will stay fresh and exactly arranged. .Moreover, the compote containing the arrangement can be put in its place of display in advance without requiring any further care or attention.

In my c'opending application Serial N0. 689,332, filed October 10, 1957,..Patent N0. 2,9,22;254,TI disclose a floral support comprising a pan having somewhat flexible .segmental frameworks rising from thebase with cross bars atthe tops, to enclose the block andfpermit flower stems to be stucx into the top and sidesofthe'blocl ,'the stems in the sides engaging the cross bars to prevent removal of the block. Such construction is very effective in anchoring the block, but the forming of the segmental frameworks is difficult and relatively expensive, particularly since the preferred material is a plastic which can be injection or compression molded.

it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel artistic fioral support which is adapted to hold in place a block of foam capable of retaining water to preserve flowers having their stems stuck into the block in various arrangements.

Another object is to provide a compote having internal means for engaging and anchoring a block of moisturere'tentive foam in place.

A further object is to provide a compote having a hollow stem with means to support a block of moistureretentive foam over the stem whereby a flower stem passing through the block into the hollow stem will hold the block in place.

These objects, and others which will become apparent are accomplished by the improved construction comprising the present invention, a preferred embodiment of which is shown by way of example in the accompanying drawings. Various modifications and changes in details of construction are comprehended within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view of the improved compote with a block of moisture-retentive foam supported therein and receiving the stems of a floral arrangement shown in phantom lines.

FIG. 2 is a plan view with the block partly broken away.

FIG. 3 is a front elevation, partly in section, of the compote with the block removed.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view as on line -44 of FIG. 3.

The compote is preferably formed from any one of a number of conventional materials which can be injection or compression molded, such as synthetic resin. Examples of such materials are rigid polyethylenes or polyvinyls, high impact polystyrenes or members of the acrylic class.

ice

The compote has a basin portion including the curved rim 1t and the bottom wall 11. The central portion of the bottom wall 11 merges into a depending hollow stem '12 which opens into the basin portion and which preferably has at its lower end a plug 13 of reduced diameter; The plug is adapted to fit tightly into a socket 14 provided in the upper end of a pedestal 15 rising from the central portion of :a base 1%. When the plug 13 is fitted 'into the secret 14, the exterior surfaces of thestem 12 and pedestal 15 merge to form a streamlined column.

Rising from the bottom wall 11 of the basin portion-are circumferentially arranged upstanding ribs 17 extending substantially *circumlerent-ially of the stem 'l2,'threeribs "being'shown, although the number may be varied. These ribs are preferably integral with the basin port-ion, and as shown in FIG. 4, are tapered somewhat from the base to a narrower top. The ribs 17 are positioned radi-ally of the stem 12 and spaced inwardly of the outer periphery of the basin so as to snugly-engage the sides of a block 18 of moisture-retentive foam material to position'the block over thehollow open stem 12, as shown inFIGS. 1 'and 2.

Preferably, radial ribs 28 extend inwardly from the ribs 17 into the hollow stem 12. The ribs 20 have tapered portions 21 ,joined to the ribs 17 merging with shallow horizontal portions 22 which in turn merge with tapered depending rib portions 23 extending into the 1161- .low stem. The rib portions 2-3 reinforce the stem 12. "The taperzon the :rlbs 23 .as well es on thecircumfercn- 'tial ribs 17 facilitates molding the basin,'ribs and stem in one piece.

The material of which the block 18 is formed may be foamed synthetic resin material such as a phenol formaldehyde foam, although other foams such as urea formaldehyde foams could be used. The foam must 'be capa- =ble of being made moisture absorbent and moisture retentive and to be crushable to an extent of receiving and yet supporting the stems of flowers in desired arrangements.

In using phenol formaldehyde foam, phenol formaldehyde resin in liquid form is supplied by the manufacturer in graduated viscosities. A batch of any convenient size is measured out, it being preferable to secure the desired viscosity by mixing measured amounts of selected viscosities, depending upon the density of the foam which is to be made. To the batch is added a foaming agent and a small amount of an agent which will impart a suitable degree of softness and resilience to the finished product. The proportioning of the heavy and lighter resins and the use of a softening agent is within the skill of one familiar with this art and need not be set forth in detail.

The mass or block of foam formed in the manner described is a very poor water absorbent. In order that the material forming the base be water retentive and in order to ensure that the block will absorb and retain water, the exterior of the block should be treated with a wetting agent which will promote the absorption and retention of the water. For this purpose, any of the well-known wetting agents such, for example, as those described in applicants former Patent No. 2,753,277 of July 3, 1956, may be employed.

The blocks 18 used in the present invention are usually cut from larger blocks of the foamed material, made as described above or from similar materials familiar to those acquainted with the art. Each block 18 is cut so as to fit snugly within the circumferential ribs 17, and the block is then treated with a Wetting agent on all surfaces. The block is saturated with water before being inserted into the basin portion 19 within the ribs 17.

As the block 13 is pushed downwardly within the ribs 17, the foam material crushes to allow the radial ribs 20 to become embedded into the under surfaces of the block until the bottom of the block contacts the bottom wall 11 of the basin portion. The engagement of the radial ribs 20 into the block aids in maintaining the block in'position.

As shown in FIGJI, the stems of flowers can be inserted into the block in various arrangements to make an attractive floral display. At least one flower stem S may betpassed through the central portion of the block and down into the hollow stem 12 to further" anchor or stabilize the blockj in position. The bore of the stein is extended into a narrow opening 25 in the plug 13,

which is adapted to snugly engage and support the bottom portion of a single flower stem 8.

Accordingly, the novel and improved compote provides an artistic floral support for securely holding desired arirangements of'flowers in place and supplying them with basin portion having a central hollow stem depending therefrom and opening into said basin portion, a plurality of upstanding ribs within said basin arranged circumferentially of said hollow stem, radial ribs extending inwardly from said circumferential ribs into said hollow sides and said radial ribs adapted for embedding into a the bottom surface of a block of moistureretentive crushable foam material to position the block over the hollow stem whereby a flower stem passed through the block into said hollow stem will aid in holding the block in place. 1

stem, said circumferential ribs adapted for engaging the 2. A compote, for floral arrangements comprising a basin portion having a bottom wall and a central hollow stem depending therefrom and opening into said basin portioma plurality of upstanding ribs within said basin arising from said bottom wall and arranged circumferentially of 'said'hollow stem, radial ribs extending inwardly from said circumferential ribs into said hollow stem, said circumferential ribs adapted for engaging the sides and said-radial ribs-adapted for embedding into the bottom surface of a block of-rnoisture-retentive crushable foam material to position the block over the hollow stern whereby a flower stem passed through the block into said hollow stem will aid in holding the block in place. 3'. A compote for floral arrangements comprising a basin portion having a central hollow stem depending therefrom and opening into said basin portion, a plurality of upstanding ribs Within and spaced inwardly of the outer periphery of said basin arranged circumferentially of said hollow stem and extending substantially circumferentially thereof, said circumferential ribs being adapted for engaging the sides of a, block of moisture-retentive crushable foam material to position the block over the hollow stem whereby a flower stem passed through the block into said hollow stem will aid in'holding the block in place.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Smithers June 23, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1801281 *Nov 18, 1929Apr 21, 1931New Martinsville Glass Mfg CoDisplay vase
US1855719 *Jan 17, 1930Apr 26, 1932Scovill Manufacturing CoMetal vase
US2891353 *Jun 26, 1956Jun 23, 1959V L Smithers Mfg CompanyFlower holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3368303 *Jun 29, 1966Feb 13, 1968Duncan TongMolded receptacle for flowers
US3374575 *Jun 29, 1966Mar 26, 1968Duncan TongIntegrally molded flower holder
US3630811 *Jan 7, 1970Dec 28, 1971Radus HarveyArtificial topiary construction
US3651601 *Jul 31, 1970Mar 28, 1972Montagne Richard L LaFlower holders
US3962825 *Jan 20, 1975Jun 15, 1976Floral Innovations, Inc.Holder for supporting flower arrangements
US5315782 *Oct 16, 1992May 31, 1994Barclay William MSupport device for supporting plants
US5317832 *Apr 23, 1993Jun 7, 1994Kollen Myron HFlower holder
US6128855 *Feb 11, 1999Oct 10, 2000Novelty Manufacturing Co.Cemetery vase
US7013549 *Sep 26, 2003Mar 21, 2006Camillo MeleMethod of making a decorative arrangement
US7020946 *Oct 22, 2003Apr 4, 2006Camillo MeleMethod of making a decorative arrangement
US7260914 *Jun 14, 2004Aug 28, 2007Floral Transport Systems, LlcMethod and apparatus for packaging horticultural products
US20050015961 *Oct 22, 2003Jan 27, 2005Camillo MeleMethod of making a decorative arrangement
US20050138861 *Jun 14, 2004Jun 30, 2005O'connor JeremiahMethod and apparatus for packaging horticultural products
US20050138862 *Nov 30, 2004Jun 30, 2005O'connor JeremiahMethod and apparatus for packaging horticultural products
US20150020446 *Oct 9, 2014Jan 22, 2015Farnaz ZandHandheld Bouquet Container
EP0038267A1 *Apr 14, 1981Oct 21, 1981Camille EychenneHolder for cut flowers
EP0051799A1 *Oct 28, 1981May 19, 1982Mertens, Helmut, jun.Container for holding cut flowers and plants
WO2005065217A2 *Dec 22, 2004Jul 21, 2005Floral Transport Systems, LlcMethod and apparatus for packaging horticultural products
WO2005065217A3 *Dec 22, 2004Mar 19, 2009Floral Transp Systems LlcMethod and apparatus for packaging horticultural products
Classifications
U.S. Classification47/41.12
International ClassificationA47G7/03, A47G7/07, A47G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G7/03, A47G7/07
European ClassificationA47G7/03, A47G7/07