Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3003560 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1961
Filing dateSep 2, 1958
Priority dateSep 2, 1958
Publication numberUS 3003560 A, US 3003560A, US-A-3003560, US3003560 A, US3003560A
InventorsCorley Jr Charles B, Kenneday John W, Tausch Gilbert H
Original AssigneeJersey Prod Res Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump tool for reworking submarine wells
US 3003560 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1961 c. B. CORLEY, JR., ETAL 3,003,560

PUMP TOOL FOR REWORKING SUBMARINE WELLS Filed Sept. 2, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. CHARLES B. CORLEY,JR., GILBERT H. TAUSCH,

JOHN W. KENNEDAY,

ATTORNEY.

Oct. 10, 1961 CORLEY 4 3,003,560

PUMP TOOL FOR REWORKING SUBMARINE WELLS Filed Sept. 2, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS. e. CORLEY,JR.,

TAUSCH, NNE DAY,

ATTORNEY.

CHARLES fig??? KE BY l/Il k United States atent PUMP TOOL FOR This invention relates to oil and gas wells. More particularly, this invention relates to pump tools for pumpmg members, such as tubular extensions used in carrying out workover operations, into a well through bent tubing.

Often, it is very ditficult to lower tools into a well by means of gravity or by wireline. For example, when a well is located ofishore, it is necessary that the various tools which are lowered into the well be placed in tubing located onshore and some means devised for transporting these tools through the tubing out to the well. This tubing often has many bends or curves through which the tools must be passed. To get the tools from onshore to the offshore well, a pumping tool isoften utilized.

The invention to be described herein is a new and improved pumping tool for use in pumping other members into a well through tubing extending into the well, for example, through tubing extending from the shoreline to the interior of the Well. Briefly described, the pumping tool includes a string of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another. The provision of the means permitting angular movement of the members with respect to one another enables the tool to pass through any bends in the tubing. Pressure actuatable means, such as .cuppackers, are mounted on at least one of the members. The packers permit a differential pressure to be developed so that the tool can be pumped through the tubing. The tool is also provided with a fluid passageway which bypasses the pressure isolating means. Whether-or not fluid flows through the fluid by-pass is controlled by a valve. As the tool is pumped into the well, the valve prevents fluid from going through the passageway. After the tool has performed its function of transporting other members into position in the well, the valve is moved to a position to allow fluid to flow through the by-pass passageway. Hence, as the tool is removed from the well, fluid flows through the by-pass, thus equalizing pressure across the packers to permit easy removal of the tool.

The operation of the device, as well as its many other advantages, will be further understood by reference to the detailed description and drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view showing the means for pumping the tool into the well from the shoreline;

FIG. 2 is a schematic elevational View showing the tool being removed after an extension member has been locked into position within the well; FIG. 3 is an elevational view, partly in section, showin the pumping tool with the valve means in the position I assumed as the tool is being pumped into the well;

FIG. 4 is a view similar-to FIG. 3, showing the position of the valve as the tool is being removed fromthe well; FIG. 5 is a sectional elevational view of another embodiment of a pumping tool with the valve means in position as the tool is being pumped into the well;

FIG. 6 is the embodiment of FIG. 5, showing the position of the valve means as the tool is being removed from the well; and

FIG. 7 shows the embodiment of FIGS. 3 and 4 used for pumping a perforator into the oflshore well.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, a borehole is shown penetrating the earth and traversing subsurface formations 10 and 11. The borehole includes the usual casing 12 which is cemented to the sides of the borehole by means of cement 14.

Production tubing 16 extends into the well and terminates at a point above the bottom of the well. The production tubing 16 extends through a well head 18 and connects with a short radius bend pipe 20. The short radius bend pipe 20 is coupled to a laterally extending conduit 22 by means of a coupling means 24. The well, short radius bend pipe 20, and laterally extending pipe 22 are all below the water line 26.

Pipe 22, extends to the shore 28. A lubricator 30 is connected to the pipe 22. Valves 32 and 34 are pro vided at the extremities of lubricator 30.

Extending from the lubricator 30 is a conduit 36. Fluid may be pumped into the lubricator 30, laterally extending pipe 22, bend 20, and production tubing 16 by means of pump 38.

Connected to the lower portion of production tubing 16 is a circulating flow line 40. The flow line 40 extends up to the well head 18 where it is attached to a laterally extending conduit 42 which leads to a pump 44 located onshore.

Packing means 46 are provided in the well near the lower extremity of the production tubing 16 and below the junction of production tubing 16 and circulating line 40.

FIG. 1 shows a tubular extension member 48 which has been pumped into position within the well. The tubular'extension 48 includes an extension hanger 50 containing locking dogs 52. A packer 54is also included about the extension hanger 50. The extension member 48 is locked into position within the production tubing 16 by the provision of a landing nipple 56 provided in the production tubing 16. The landing nipple 56 includes a recess 58 for receiving the locking dogs 52. The extension member 48 is made of flexible material so that it can he passed through the short radius bend pipe 20.

The flexible extension member 48 has been pumped into the desired position by use of the new and novel pumping tool indicated generally by the numeral 60.

FIG. 3 shows in detail the structure of the pumping tool 60, with the 'parts in the position assumed as the tool is being pumped into the well. The tool 60' includes a string of members 62, 64, 66, 68, and 70, which areconnected together for angular movement with respect to one another. These members may be connected together, for example, by a universal type joint, such as the knuckle joints 72, 74, 76, and 78. The spacing between the knuckle joints and the diameters of the mem bers are such that the tool 60 will pass through the bends in the tubing, such as bend 20 of FIG. 1. For example, if the production tubing 16 has an inside diameter of 2 /2 inches, a spacing between the knuckle joints of 10 inches and a diameter for the members of about 2 inches has been found very satisfactory.

In order to pump the tool 60 through the tubing and into the well, it is necessary that at least one pressure actuatable means be provided. In the embodiment of FIG. 3 the pressure actuatable means includes apair of packers and 82 mounted on mandrels 66 and 68, respectively. Cup packers 80 and 82 face upwardly, as seen in FIG. 3.

A fluid passageway 84 extends from fluid inlet 86 located above the packer 80 to fluid outlet 88 located between the cup packers 80 and 8 2. A second fluid passageway 90 extends from fluid inlet 92 located above the cup packer 82 to a fluid outlet 94 located below packer 82. Hence, fluid passageways 84 and 90 provide fluid by-passes around packers 80 and 82, respectively.

In order for the tool 60 to be properly pumped from the shoreline to within the well, it is necessary that a valve means be provided for closing the fluid passageways 84 and 90 as the tool is pumped into the well. After the pumping tool 60 has properly positioned the extension member in 'thelanding nipple 56 of tubing 16 (see FIGS. 1 and 2), it is necessary that the pressure across each of the packers 80 and 82 be equalized. This is accomplished by the movement of the valve means so as to permit fluids-to bypass the packers 80 and 82.

'The valves shown in FIG. 3 are friction slide valves 96-located above packer 80, and 98 located above packer 82. Friction slide'valves 96 and 98 are substantially annular in shape. The outside diameter of the valves are large enough so that they are substantially always in frictional contact with the inside diameter of the tubing as the pumping tool 60 is moved through the tubing. Hence, as the pumping tool is being flowed toward the well, the friction of valves 96 and 98 with the tubing 16 forces annular slide valves 96 and 98 upwardly, as seen in FIG. 3, to close the fluid by-pass inlets 86 and 92, respectively. O-rings 100 and 102 are provided on the inside diameters of the slide valves 96 and 98 to provide fluid-tight engagement with the mandrels 66 and 68, respectively. Circular stops 104 and 106 are provided about mandrel 66 to limit the upward and downward movement of slide valve 96. Similarly, circular stops 108 and 110 are provided about mandrel 68 to limit the upward and downward movement of slide valve 98.

A fishing neck 112 is provided at the upper extremity of the pumping tool 60. Attached to the fishing neck is a wireline 114 (see FIGS. 1 and 2) used, among other things, toremove the pumpingtool 60 from the well after the extension member has been properly positioned within production tubing 16.

In the operation of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the pumping tool 60 and extension member 48 are placed in the lubricator 30. Pump 38 is then operated to apply pressure through tubing 22, tubing 20, and production tubing 16. At the same time, pump 44 is operated to applysuction to tubing 42 and flow line 40. The tool 60 and extension member 48 are then pumped into position within the nipple 56 on production tubing 16. After the extension member 48 has been properly positioned, tension is applied to wireline 1-14 to remove the pumping tool 60 from the well. As tension is applied to the wireline 114, the slide valves 96 and 98 are moved downwardly because of the frictional contact with production tubing 16 to engage cylindrical stops 106 and 110, respectively (see FIG. 4). Thus, as the tool 60 is removed to the surface, the fluids contained in the tubing will by-pass packers 80 and 82 through fluid passageways'84 and 90, respectively. The tool'60 is thus easily removed without having to overcome a pressure differential which would be developed across packers 80 and 82 if it were not for the provision of fluid by-passes 84 and 90. The removal of the tool 60 may be further facilitated bythe application of'fluid pressure simultaneously with the placing of tension on wireline 114. For this purpose, downwardly facing cup packers 111 and 113 are provided about mandrels 62 and 64, respectively. Pressure is then applied to remove the pumping tool 60 by applying pressure directly through line 42 by pump '44, and applying suction through production tubing -16, tubing 20, and tubing22by means of pump 38. Alternatively, the tool 60 may be pumped directly out of the Well without the use of the wireline 114, if desired.

A secondembodiment of pump tool is shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 wherein like parts to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 are referred to by like numerals. Instead of the annular friction slide valve, however, a spring biasedball valve is included in the fluid by-passes.

Referring to FIG. 5, fluid passageway 200 and 202 bypass the upwardly facing cup packers 80 and 82, respectively. By-pass 200 has a.first portion 204 of greater diameter. A piston 206 is 'shear pinned at the lower extremity of the portion of greater diameter 204 by means of shear pin 208. A ball valve 210 is spring biased by coil spring 212 against the inlet to the chamber 204. Similarly, by-pass 202 has a first portion 214 of greater diameter. A piston 216 is shear pinned to the lower portion of chamber 214 by shear pin 218. Coil spring 220 normally biases ball valve 222 against the fluid inlet to chamber 214.

Each of the fluid by-passes 200 and 202 is also provided with a second portion 223 and 224, respectively, of still greater diameter, which are adjacent the chambers 204, 214, respectively.

Using the pump tool shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the tool is used to pump the other member, such as the extension member 48 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, into the well in a manner similar to the pump tool shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. Referring again to FIG. 1, the pump tool is placed in the lubricator 30 and then pumped through the tubing into the well. The pump pressure used is not great enough to shear the shear pins 208 and 218.

After the extension member has been properly positioned within the production tubing 16, additional pressure is applied against the pistons 206 and 216 to shear the shear pins 208 and 218. Pistons 206 and 216 will then be permitted to fall into the larger chambers 222 and 224, respectively. Since the diameters of pistons 206 and 216 are smaller than the diameters of the chambers 222 and 224, the fluid will by-pass the packers and. 82 as the pump tool is removed by the wireline to the surface. As in the embodiment of FIGS. 3 and 4, the embodiment of FIGS. 5 and 6 may be pulled upwardly with respect to the fluid by means of thewireline, or may have tension applied to the wireline while pumping simultaneously, or the tool may be pumped back up to the surface without the use of a wireline.

The new device described herein may be used for pumping various members into a well other than the tubing extension shown in FIGS. 1 through 6.

FIG. 7 shows a gun perforator which has been run through the'production tubing 16 and landed in the bottom of the production tubing 16 upon a landing nipple 300. For use in running gun perforators of the type shown in FIG. 7, the pump tool 60 of FIGS. 3 and 4 is provided with a longitudinally extending passageway 302. Each of the members 62, 64, 66, 68, and 70 is provided with a longitudinally extending passageway, with the passageways in intercommunication. When the tool is used for placing extension members, such as extension member 48, in a well, the longitudinally extending passageways are plugged by plugs 304, 306, 308, and 310.

Referring to FIG. 7 again, when it is desired to run a gun perforator into the well, the plugs are removed from the tool and a conductor cable 312 is run through the longitudinally extending pasasgeways 302 and connected to the electrical equipment within the gun perforator 314.

The lower portion 316 of perforator gun 314 is made of flexible material so that it will pass through the bends in the tubing. Portion 316 may be made expendable and leave the upper portion 318 of tubing perforator 314 remaining on landing nipple 300 afterthe desired perforations have been made-within the producing formation.

After the perforations have been made, the pump tool 60 and portion 318 of the gun perforator are removed by tension applied to cables 312 and/or pump pressure applied down side flowline' 40 and up production tubing 16.

We claim:

1. An elongated device 'for use in pumping members through tubing extending into awell comprising: a plurality of members connected together for angular movement with respect .to one another to permit passage of the tool'through any bends in the tubing; a cup packer mounted on each of two adjacent members, said packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device into the well; an annular friction slide mounted for slidable movement about'each of two adjacent members, the slide valves being substantially always in frictional contact with the tubing during movement through the tubing, the two adjacent memberseach having a fluid by-pass extending from a' point spaced from the face-side of the cup packer on the particular member to the other side, and stops mounted on the two adjacent members so that the slide valves are movablebyfrictional contact with the tubing to a position to clojse'the by-passes as the device is being pumped into the well and toa position to open the by-passes as the device is' removed from the well.

2. An elongated device for use in pumping members through tubingextending into a well comprising: a plurality of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another to permit passage of the tool through any bends in the tubing; a first cup packertmounted on one member and a second cup packer mounted on a second member adjacent said one mem: ber, said cup packers being faced in such a direction to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in one direction; a third cuppacker mounted on a third member and a fourth cup packer mounted on a fourth member adjacent said third member, said packers being faced in'such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in the other direction; an annular friction slide valve mounted for slidable movement about each of the third and fourth members, the slide valves being substantially always in frictional contact With the tubing during movement through the tubing, the third and fourth members each having a fluid by-pass extending from a point spaced from the face-side of the cup packer on the particular member to the other side, and stops mounted on the third and fourth members so that the slide valves are mova ble by frictional contact with the tubing to a position to close the by-passes as the device is being pumped into the well and to a position to open the by-passes as the device is removed from the well.

3. An elongated device for use in pumpingv members through tubing extending into a well comprising: a plurality of members, eachconnected to adjacent members by knuckle joints, the spacing between the knuckle joints and diameters of the members being such that the elongated device will pass through bends in the tubing; a first cup packer mounted on one member and a second cup packer mounted on a second member adjacent said one member, said cup packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in one direction; a third cup packer mounted on a third member and a fourth cup packer mounted on a fourth member adjacent said third member, said packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in the other direction; an annular friction slide valve mounted for slidable move ment about each of the third and fourth members, the slide valves being substantially always in frictional contact with the tubing during movement through the tubing, the third and fourth members each having a fluid by-pass extending from a point spaced from the face-side of the cup packer on the particular member to the other side, and stops mounted on the third and fourth members so that the slide valves are movable by frictional contact with the tubing to a position to close the by-passes as the device is being pumped into the well and to a position to open the by-passes as the device is removed from the well.

4. An elongated device for use in pumping members through tubing extending into a well comprising: a plurality of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another to permit passage of the tool through any bends in the tubing; a cup packer mounted on each of two adjacent members, said packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to. move the device into the well; the two adjacent members each having a fluid by-pass extending from a point spaced from the face-side of the cup packer on the particular member to the other side, the by-pass having a first portion of greater diameter and an adjacent second portion of still greater diameter; a piston shearpinned at one extremity of said first portion of greater diameter; and a spring biased ball valve held by the piston against the fluid inlet to the first portion of greater diameter so that the device can be pumped into the well, additional pressure applied against the pistons to shear the shear pins, and the pistons moved into the second portions of still greater diameter in the by-passes to permit the fluids in the tubing to flow through the by-passes as the device is removed from the well.

5. An elongated device for use in pumping members through tubing extending into a well comprising: a plurality of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another to permit passage of the tool through any bends in the tubing; a first cup packer mounted on one member and a second cup packer mounted on a second member adjacent said one member, said cup packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated bythe pumping of the fluid to move the device in one direction; a third cup packer mounted on a third member and a fourth cup packer mounted on a fourth member adjacent said third member, said packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in the other direction; the third and fourth members each having a fluid by-pass extending from a point spaced from the face-side of the cup packer on the particular member to the other side, the by-pass having a first portion of greater diameter and an adjacent second portion of still greater diameter; a piston shear-pinned at one extremity of said first portion of greater diameter; and a spring biased ball valve held by thev piston against the fluid inlet to the first portion of greater diameter so that the device can be pumped into the well, additional pressure applied against the pistons to shear the shear pins, and the pistons moved into the secondportions of still greater diameter in the by-passes as the device is removed from the well.

6. An elongated device for use in pumping members through tubing extending into a well comprising: a plurality of members, each connected to adjacent members by knuckle joints, the spacing between the knuckle joints and diameters of the members being such that the elongated device will pass through bends in the tubing; a first cup packer mounted on one member and a second cup packer mounted on a second member adjacent said one member, said cup packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in one direction; a third cup packer mounted on a third member and a fourth cup packer mounted on a fourth member adjacent said third member, said packers being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device in the other direction, the third and fourth members each having a fluid by-pass extending from a point spaced from the face-side of the cup packer on the particular member to the other side, the by-pass having a first portion of greater diameter and an adjacent second portion of still greater diameter; a piston shear-pinned at one extremity of said first portion of greater diameter; and a spring biased ball valve held by the piston against the fluid inlet to the first portion of greater diameter so that the device can be pumped into the well, additional pressure applied against the pistons to shear the shear pins, and the pistons moved into the second portions of still greater diameter in the bypasses to permit the fluids in the tubing to flow through the bypasses as the device is removed from the well.

7. A pump tool in accordance with claim 3 wherein the members have an opening extending longitudinally therethrough so that, if desired, conductor cables can be passed through the openings.

8. An elongated device for use in pumping members through tubing extending into a well comprising: a plurality of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another .to permit passage of the device through any bends in the tubing; at least one cup packer connected to the device, said packer being connected to one of the members, said cup packer being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of the fluid to move the device into the well; a friction slide valve mounted on said member to which the cup packer is connected and at a point spaced from the face side of the cup packer, the slide valve being substantially always in frictional contact with the tubing during movement through the tubing, the device having afluid bypass extending from a point spaced from the face side of the cup packer to the other side; and stops on said one of the members engageable by the :slide valve mounted so that the slide valve is movable by frictional contact with the tubing to a position to close the bypass as the-device is being pumped into the well and to a position to open the bypass as the device is removed from the well.

9. An elongated device for use in pumping members through tubing extending into a well comprising: a plurality of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another to, permit passage of the device through any bends in the tubing; at least one cup packer connected to the device, said packer being connected to one of the members, said cup packer being faced in such a direction as to be actuated by the pumping of fluid to move the device into the well; said member to which the cup packer is connected having a fluid bypass extending from a point spaced from the face side of the cup packer to the other side, :the bypass having a portion of greater diameter with a valve therein with frangible means normally holding the valve closed so that the device can be pumped into the well, additional pressure applied to break the frangible means to permit the fluids in .the tubing to flow through the bypass as the device is removed from the well.

10. A- pump tool for use in pumping other members into a well through tubing extending into the well comprising: a string of members connected together for angular movement with respect to one another to permit passage of the tool through any bends in the tubing; at least one of said members having a cup packer mounted thereon; a fluid passageway in said tool which bypasses said cup packer; and a valve mechanism for controlling fluid'fiow through said fluid passageway, the valve mechanism being adapted to assume a first position to preventfluid from going through the passageway as the tool and other members are pumped into the well and also adapted to assume a second position to allow fluid to flow through the passageway as the tool is removed from the well.

11. A pump tool in accordance with claim '10 wherein the valve mechanism isa friction slide valve in contact with the tubing, and a stop on the tool located so that the friction slide valve contacts the stop and covers the fluid passageway entrance as the tool is pumped into the well and moves away from the fluid passageway entrance as the tool is removed from the well.

12. 'Apump tool in accordance with claim 11 wherein the friction slide valve is annular.

13. A pump tool in accordance with claim 10 wherein the'flu'id passageway which bypasses the packer includes a portion of greater diameter, and the valve mechanism is a valve connected to-the sides of the'fluid passageway with frangible means to normally close the fluid passageway.

14. 'A pump tool'in accordance with claim 13 wherein the fluid passageway which bypasses the packer includes a second portion of even greater diameter adjacent said portion of greater diameter, and the valve mechanism includes a spring biased ball valve normally held in a closed position by a piston shear pinned to one extremity of said portion of greater'diameter so that the packer can be bypassed by shearing the shear pins to move the piston into the second portion of even greater diameter.

15. A pump tool in accordance with claim 10 wherein the members each have an opening extending longitudinally therethrough, said openings communicating with each other so that, if desired, conductor cables can be passed through'the openings.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US876566 *May 2, 1907Jan 14, 1908Franz Heinrich LehnertTube and flue cleaner.
US1966819 *Oct 8, 1932Jul 17, 1934Gulf Pipe Line CompanySlugging liquids through conduits and the like
US2392144 *May 29, 1943Jan 1, 1946Hall Jesse EPipe-line cleaner
US2810440 *Jul 25, 1955Oct 22, 1957Exxon Research Engineering CoTubular extension member for wells
US2810442 *Jul 25, 1955Oct 22, 1957Exxon Research Engineering CoFlexible tubular extension member for wells
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3097696 *Jul 27, 1961Jul 16, 1963Jersey Prod Res CoSelf-expanding retrievable or permanent bridge plug
US3126058 *Jun 22, 1961Mar 24, 1964 Position selector device for wells
US3150717 *Jun 15, 1961Sep 29, 1964Shell Oil CoTwo-diameter tool carrier
US3239004 *Jun 10, 1963Mar 8, 1966Kobe IncApparatus for running equipment into and out of offshore well completions
US3289533 *Apr 6, 1965Dec 6, 1966Brown Charles RMissile launching tube seal
US3307631 *Apr 30, 1963Mar 7, 1967Kobe IncApparatus for running equipment into and out of offshore well completions
US3312282 *Jan 30, 1964Apr 4, 1967Shell Oil CoPumping well tools through flowlines of irregular diameter
US3331437 *Jan 6, 1965Jul 18, 1967Cameron Iron Works IncWellhead assembly
US3332493 *Oct 20, 1964Jul 25, 1967Cameron Iron Works IncApparatus for guiding a well tool being pumped out of a well into a laterally branching flow line
US3357491 *May 11, 1967Dec 12, 1967Cameron Iron Works IncChristmas tree for wells
US3395759 *Sep 9, 1966Aug 6, 1968Mobil Oil CorpWell tool pumpable through a flowline
US3396789 *Sep 15, 1966Aug 13, 1968Mobil Oil CorpStorage method and system for tel tools
US3444927 *Nov 21, 1967May 20, 1969Exxon Production Research CoServicing of wells
US3464496 *Sep 30, 1968Sep 2, 1969Exxon Production Research CoRunning of elongated pipe in a well
US3508614 *Oct 18, 1967Apr 28, 1970Exxon Production Research CoMethod of servicing wells using a curved conduit
US4178649 *Apr 28, 1978Dec 18, 1979Carrier CorporationTube cleaning device
US4616706 *Feb 21, 1985Oct 14, 1986Exxon Production Research Co.Apparatus for performing subsea through-the-flowline operations
US6209652Feb 3, 1998Apr 3, 2001Lance N. PortmanDeployment system method and apparatus for running bottomhole assemblies in wells, particularly applicable to coiled tubing operations
US7549475Feb 12, 2007Jun 23, 2009Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Systems for actuating a downhole tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/70, 166/351, 166/170
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B23/08
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/08
European ClassificationE21B23/08