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Publication numberUS3005489 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1961
Filing dateOct 19, 1959
Priority dateOct 19, 1959
Publication numberUS 3005489 A, US 3005489A, US-A-3005489, US3005489 A, US3005489A
InventorsBlaisdell Edward I, Crocker William W
Original AssigneeCrocker Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination window and roller screen assembly
US 3005489 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1961 w. w. CROCKER EI'AL 3,005,489

COMBINATION WINDOW AND ROLLER SCREEN ASSEMBLY Filed Oct. 19, 1959 I F F U 0 50 j 20 5 I 20 WILLIAM W. CROCKER EDWARD l. BLAISDELL ATTOR NEYS 3,005,489 COMBINATION- WINDOW AND ROLLER SCREEN ASSEMBLY William W. Crocker, Arlington, and Edward I. Blaisdell, Somerviile, Mass, assignors to Cracker Corporation, Cambridge, Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts Filed Oct. 19, 1959, Ser. No. 847,155 3 Claims. (Cl. 160-28) The present invention relates to window screens and is concerned more particularly with improvements in rollertype window screens.

In the conventional window screen arrangement, the screen or mesh portion is secured to a rigid frame. With such construction the full area of the screen is in position to obstruct view through the window, even when the window itself is closed, unless the screen sash is physically removed fro-m the Window. Nevertheless, the fixed screen has continued to be in common usage because of the difiiculties inherent in providing a satisfactory rollertype screen assembly,

Previous attempts to provide a roller-type screen have involved structures in which the roller screen housing is secured to a movable glazed sash and the end of the roller screen connected to the window sill. With such an arrangement, the roller screen housing tends to provide an obstruction to the view through the window, its exact position depending upon the amount of area being screened.

Furthermore, with such an assembly it is difficult to detach the roller screen from the glazed sash to provide a clear opening when desired, as for cleaning.

Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide an adjustable window closure incorporating a roller screen which can be easily connect-ed and disconnected from the glazed movable sash so that the window may be opened without the screen or, when desired, the screen may be drawn across the opening as the window is opened.

A further object is to provide a roller screen window assembly particularly though by no means exclusively suitable for incorporation in a combination storm window assembly of the type commonly installed outside existing windows for additional weather protection.

These and other objects of the invention are attained through the provision in a window unit employing sliding double-hung sash of a roller screen wherein the free end of the screen is adapted to be detachably connected by readily actuated securing means to one end of a sliding window sash, so as to follow the raising and lowering movement thereof.

More specifically, a feature of the present invention is the provision on both the slidable glazed sash and the end of the screen of cooperating elements which, when the slidable sash is closed, automatically assume a relationship that permits the cooperating portions to be secured together by simple latching means to insure that the screen will raise and lower with the window sash.

The invention likewise involves the several features and details of the device as hereinafter described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings showing the invention in a preferred embodiment wherein FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view of the lower portion of a window sash showing the roller screen disengaged from the movable sash.

FIG. 2 is a cross section view showing the roller screen engaged with the movable glazed sash.

FIG. 3 is a detail view of the lever-type securing means for use in this embodiment,

As shown in FIG. 1, the roller screen is mounted at the lower portion of the window within a housing 2 secured Patented Oct. 24, 1961 at its ends to the fixed side frame members 3 of the window unit. A conventional roll spring mechanism 4 within the roller 8 provides. a torque tending to return the screen 6 into the housing. In the retracted position shown, the bulk of the screen is stored upon the roller 8. The free end of the screen is clamped within transverse reinforcing strip 10. Edge 11 of housing 2 provides a positive stop for reinforcing strip 10 and thus maintains the strip in predetermined uniform position when disengaged from the sash.

According to a feature of the invention, the screen reenforcing strip 10, and the lower portion of the window sash to be described, are constructed and arranged to permit connection and disconnection as desired. To this end, reinforcing strip 10 is provided with overhanging lip 12 extending across the top thereof and laterally of the general plane of the window. The lip 12 is provided with a top surface 14 inclined downwardly and outwardly, while the underside portion 16 immediately adjacent the tip of the lip slopes in the opposite direction downwardly and away from the general plane of the window. 1

To cooperate with the screen reenforcing strip 10 when the opening is to be screened, a transverse member 18 is provided at the bottom of the slidable sash 20. The transverse member 18 comprises a glass-receiving portion within which the glass is sealed by resilient sealing means 19, having a slope generally parallel to the surface 14 of reenforcing strip 10.

An integral vertical flange 24 depends from the lower edge of the web 22 and is provided on its inner side with a projection in the form of a shallow, preferably continuous rib 26 extending laterally of the sash. The rib 26 is provided with an inclined lower surface 28 extending inwardly and upwardly from flange 24 and an inclined upper surface 30 extending inwardly and downwardly from flange 24. Inclined surface 30 and the inner face of web 22 form a pocket adapted to receive and engage the lip 12 of screen strip 10, while the flange serves to overlie the screen strip 10 and cooperate with portion 48 of the screen housing in making the junction weather tight when the window is closed.

To provide locking means by which the strip 10 may be retained within the recess or pocket, the transverse member 18 carries, within a side channel 32, one or more cams 36 pivoted on rivets 38 and having handle portions 40. As more clearly shown in FIG. 3, cams 36 are provided with projections 42 and 44, projection 42 being relatively slight compared to projection 44.

Considering now the operation of the window in a situation in which the screen is initially in retracted position, as the sash 20 is lowered within its side guides 50 (shown in fragmentary fashion), the vertical flange 24 comes into contact with inclined surface 14 of rein forcing strip 10. By reason of the oblique surfaces 14 and 28 strip =10 is readily displaced inwardly so that rib 26 can pass lip 12. In the fully lowered position of the window the lip 12 lies above the rib in the pocket formed by rib 26 and the inner face of web 22.

The operation of the window when the sash is raised depends on whether or not screening of the opening is desired. If no screening is desired, a clear opening is obtained by simply raising the sash exactly as would be done if no screen were provided. The above-recited structure ensures that no accidental latching engagement of the screen with the sash will occur. As the sash is raised, surface 16 on lip 12 is diverted inwardly with respect to the general plane of the window by upper sur: face 30 of rib 26. The parts therefore disengage, leaving the screen in its lowermost position.

On the other hand, when it is desired to provide screening of the opening uncovered by the raised sash, it is a simple matter to secure the parts in latched relation. With the sash fully lowered as described above, earns 36 are rotated, engaging reinforcing strip 10 to force the lip '12 thereon into positive engagement with the pocket formed by rib 26 and the inner face of Web 22. Projection 42 on the cam is relatively slight in its protrusion so that only a light force is required to over-ride the projection as cam 36 is rotated to engage the screen with thesash. Projection 44-, however, is larger to provide a positive stop which maintains the accessibility of handle portion 40 of the cams. In this engaged position, the point of contact between earns 36 and strip It) lies between projections 42 and 44. Projection 42 on the cam is effective to prevent accidental disengagement of the cam.

With strip 10 and transverse member 18 together as described, the sliding sash 2t) may now be raised to provide a screened opening. FIG. 2 illustrates the resulting relationship of the parts. Since the contour of lip 12 on strip 10 matches that formed by rib 28 and the inner surface of web 22, the camming action provided by earns 36 insures both positive engagement between strip 10 and member 18 and correct alignment of strip ltl with the plane of the screen 6. Spring assembly 4 continually urges the return of spring 6 to roller 8 so that the extended portion of the screen is maintained in tensioned and therefore substantially plane condition. The side margins of the screen, being substantially coextensive with the sash, will slide in engagement with the usual side guides of the window, not shown.

If it is desired to provide a clear opening through the previously screened opening, sash Z is lowered. A positive stop to this lowering is provided by the abutment of strip 10 against edge 3 of the screen housing. At this point strip 10 is still in positive engagement with member 18 with strip 16 lying alongside the top margin of member 48, which serves as the front closure of the screen housing and preventing the entrance of precipitation into the screen housing or the interior of the building for all positions of the screen.

To disengage the screen when the sash is in the lowered position, cams 36 are rotated to relieve the latching pressure from strip 10. This leaves strip 16' free to rock away from rib 26 on member 18 as described above, when the sash 20 is now raised. While the strip 10 is preferably disengaged from member 18 only when sash 20 isin its lowered position, such disengagement can be made at any position of the sliding sash. However, if the screen is disengaged when the sash is in a raised position there will be a certain amount of noise as the screen rapidly returns to storage on roller 8 and the strip 10 strikes the edge 3 of screen housing 2.

While the glazed section of the window may be constructed in the normal wood and putty fashion of wooden windows, it has been found preferable to use extruded aluminum sections to form the perimeter of the glazed section, particularly where the sash is to form a part of a supplementary or storm window installation, outside the existing sash. Transverse member 18 is preferably an extrusion of aluminum or suitable alloy which provides in a single unitary structure the glass retaining function and the screen retaining function previously described. Strip 10 may also conveniently be fabricated as an alloy extrusion. However, in the embodiment shown an additional requirement is imposed on the characteristics of the alloy since this member is affixed to the end of screen 6 by a clamping action. It is difficult to fasten the end of a screen under tension with adequate security without cutting or distorting the screen, particularly in the case of non-metallic screening such as fiber glass or plastic. Heretofore it has been the practice to secure one end of a screen by first combining a section of soft metal, such as zinc, with the end of the screen and then securing the screen end rolled-metal within a frame. Such an assembly provides a bulky structure and adds fabrications steps.

According to the teachings of this invention it has been found that if strip 10 is initially provided as an extruded section with a plurality of matching serrations 56, the strip 10 can be clamped onto the end of screen 6 and the screen 6 will be held securely by the serrations. In effect, the result is that of a plurality of individual clamps, no single clamp pressing tightly enough to cut the screening, but the total clamping force being suiiicient to positively secure the screen.

While the roller screen assembly has been described in an embodiment placing it at the bottom of the window frame near the sill 60, it may of course be mounted at the top of the window frame with a corresponding inversion of all the other matching structural components. Thus the roller screen would attach to the top of the upper sash rather than the bottom of the lower sash. The lower location will generally be found to be more convenient for the typical window installation, however.

While the cooperating rib and lip portions have been described as extending the entire width of the window, the cams 36 insure such positive latching action that rib and lip portions extending over only a portion of the width will be found SllfilClfiHl'. to secure the screen to the movable sash. A continuous rib is, however, easily provided in commercially available extrusions and presents a pleasing appearance with a maximum of security against the entry of unwanted dirt or foreign material. Therefore, it is preferable that the cooperating rib and lip means extend across substantially the entire width of the window.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the window art that the teachings of the present invention result in a structure in which the provision of a roller-screen assembly in a window with a sliding sash such as a storm window is not only practical but is accomplished with a maximum of security and ease of operation.

The roll screen may readily be connected to the sash to screen the opening as the window is raised, and easily disconnected when the opening is to be left clear. The fact that no screening is present at any time to obstruct the view when the window is closed is a distinct advantage, and the construction and arrangement are such that the unit is effectively weather tight when the window is closed.

Having thus described the invention, we claim:

1. In a window assembly, a window frame, a sash slidably mounted within said frame, a roller screen, a housing for said screen mounted on the frame adjacent one end of the sash when said sash is in closed position, said housing having an aperture through which the free end of the roller screen projects toward the sash, a transverse member secured to the screen end outwardly of the housing, the sash having a transverse portion disposed adjacent the transverse member on the screen when the sash is in closed position, cooperating lip and rib means on said transverse members disposed in releasable overlying relation when the sash is in closed position, and movable cam means carried by one of said transverse members for securing said members with the lip and rib portions in overlying relation when the cam means is in operative position to cause the screen to be drawn out of the housing and across the window opening when the sash is slid toward open position, the lip and rib portions being inoperative to raise the screen with the sash in the absence of camming force when the cam means is in inoperative position.

2. In a window assembly, a window frame, a sash slidably mounted for raising and lowering movement in said frame, a roller screen mounted at the bottom of the frame, a generally circumferential housing for the roller screen, said housing being disposed inwardly of the frame and open outwardly thereof, generally vertical closure means disposed outwardly of the housing opposite said open region, the free end of the screen projecting upwardly between the housing and the vertical closure means, a first transverse member secured to the free edge of the screen and having a downwardly and outwardly depending lip overlying the upper edge of the vertical closure means when the screen is in retracted position, a second transverse member carried by the lower edge of the sash, said second transverse member having a generally downwardly and outwardly depending portion which overlaps outwardly both the lip portion of the screen edge transverse member and the upper edge of the screen housing vertical closure when the sash is lowered into closed position, the downwardly and outwardly depending portion of the second transverse member having a shallow transverse rib which is overlaid by the lip of the screen edge transverse member when the sash is in closed position, and cam means carried by the second transverse member and movable into operative position to secure the transverse members with the lip portion overlying the shallow rib portion to raise the screen with the sash, said cam means being movable into inoperative position wherein the lip and rib portions disengage from overlying relation when the sash is lifted from closed position, the rib being ineifective to retain the lip thereover in the absence of camnn'ng force.

3. In a window assembly, a window frame, a sash slidably mounted for raising and lowering movement in said frame, a roller screen mounted at the bottom of the frame, a generally circumferential housing for the roller screen, said housing being disposed inwardly of the frame and open outwardly thereof, generally vertical closure means disposed outwardly of the housing opposite said open region, the free end of the screen projecting upwardly between the housing and the vertical closure means, a first transverse member secured to the free edge of the screen and having a downwardly and outwardly depending lip overlying the upper edge of the vertical closure means when the screen is in retracted position, a second transverse member carried by the lower edge of the sash, said second transverse member having a generally outwardly and downwardly depending web portion which overlaps outwardly the lip portion of the screen edge transverse member and the upper edge of the screen housing vertical closure when the sash is lowered into closed position, the sash transverse member having Within the depending web portion a transverse ribover which the lip of the screen edge transverse member extends when the sash is closed, and cam means carried by the sash transverse member and movable into operative position to hold the lip portion of the screen edge transverse member in overlying relation to the rib within the web portion of the sash transverse member to cause the screen to lift with the sash, the rib and the lip having sloping surfaces that disengage upon lifting movement of the sash to leave the screen disconnected from the sash when the cam means is in inoperative position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,039,411 Jones Sept. 24, 1912 1,078,827 Bunnell Nov. 18, 1913 2,261,443 McGaw Nov. 4, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1039411 *Jun 5, 1911Sep 24, 1912Irving W JonesWindow-screen.
US1078827 *Jan 25, 1912Nov 18, 1913Frederick C AustinWindow-screen.
US2261443 *Jan 15, 1940Nov 4, 1941Mcgaw Foster GScreen
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4993468 *Jul 28, 1989Feb 19, 1991Hackman William AWindow with automatic screen
US7703498 *Aug 9, 2005Apr 27, 2010Michael HolevasHidden window screen
US8016013Dec 15, 2005Sep 13, 2011Louis HorvathPull bar screen apparatus and system
DE2934122A1 *Aug 23, 1979Mar 12, 1981Rau Karl KgVorrichtung zum wenigstens teilweisen abdunkeln von gebaeudeoeffnungen.
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/28
International ClassificationE06B9/54, E06B9/52
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/54
European ClassificationE06B9/54