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Publication numberUS3006003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1961
Filing dateApr 15, 1959
Priority dateApr 15, 1959
Publication numberUS 3006003 A, US 3006003A, US-A-3006003, US3006003 A, US3006003A
InventorsJohnson Jr Frank E
Original AssigneeUnited Carr Fastener Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of swaging interrupted threads in a sheet metal nut
US 3006003 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 31, 1961 F. E. JOHNSON, JR 3,006,003

METHOD OF SWAGING INTERRUPTED THREADS IN A SHEET METAL NUT Filed April 15, 1959 Maui: E. Jofinsou Jr,

fwvewiorl United States Patent 3,006,003 METHOD OF SWAGING INTERRUPTED THREADS IN A SHEET METAL NUT Frank E. Johnson, Jr., Malden, Mass., assignor to United- Carr Fastener Corporation, Cambridge, Mass., a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 15, 1959, Ser. No. 806,481 2 Claims. (Cl. 10-86) My invention relates to the method of forming threads on a nut, particularly in the inside wall of a nut to receive a threaded bolt.

An object of my invention is to provide an improved method of forming nut threads so as to eliminate a costly secondary threading operation as presently used in threading nuts.

A further object of my invention is to form a sheet metal nut with a barrel portion and then form threads therein in the same tools and machine as forms the barrel of the nut and Without using a rotary threading tool, but by a simple mandrel having opposed threaded sides and other opposed unthreaded sides. The mandrel cooperates with squeezing or swaging dies and the mandrel may be moved out of the barrel of the nut, after the threads are formed, by a simple 90 turn and a nonrotating axial withdrawal.

Thus my invention provides for a simple, fast and cheap method of forming threads in a nut.

Other objects of the invention will, in part, be obvious, and will, in part, appear hereinafter.

In the drawing which illustrates a preferred form of my invention:

FIG. 1 is an edge view of a strip showing some of the steps taken to form my invention;

FIG. 2 is a section taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 with the thread forming mandrel in elevation and the swaging dies added and in swaging position;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 with the mandrel rotated to a position for retraction and the swaging dies released;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged plan section taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 2 with part of the tool die block added in section;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged section taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 4 and also showing a part of the tool die block in section;

FIG. 6 is a side view of a bolt and closed end nut made according to my improved method;

FIG. 7 is a section of the nut shown in FIG. 6 with out the bolt; and

FIG. 8 is a side view of a bolt and nut, the nut having an open end in the barrel.

Referring first to the preferred forms of nuts made by my improved method, I have shown a sheet metal nut having a base flange 1, a barrel 2, an inside wall 3, and cooperating threads formed in groups opposite each other as best illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 7. Thus the threads are not continuous around the wall 3, the reasons for which will be described later.

The nut shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 has a closed bottom wall 5, while the bottom wall is punched out in the nut shown in FIG. 8 so that the shank of a bolt 6 may pass through the barrel of the nut as illustrated.

Sheet metal threaded nuts are well known in the art and have been made by, first, manufacturing the nut with an unthreaded barrel in a conventional type of metal working press, then the nuts have been threaded in various types of thread tapping machines. This method of making the nuts requires additional handling of the parts, expensive tapping equipment and a relatively slow operation. Applicant has found that the nuts can be threaded in the conventional press by using a mandrel 7 at a station in the press after the final cup or barrel shape has been formed as shown in FIG. 1. This mandrel 7 is moved into and out of the barrel as the forming tools in the machine are moved toward and away from each other. By incorporating squeezing or swaging dies 8-8 at the station where the mandrel is inserted and moving these swaging dies toward and away from each other, I squeeze opposite sides of the barrel against oppositely threaded portions 9-9 of the mandrel 7 as shown in FIG. 2. After the threads have been formed the mandrel is rotated as shown in FIG. 3 so that the flat unthreaded sides 10-10 of the mandrel are opposite the threads in the barrel in the nut. Since the distance between the flat sides 10-10 is less than the distance between the threaded sides 9-9 of the mandrel, the mandrel may be moved axially out of the nut when the parts of the die blocks are moved away from each other. The type of press applicant has in mind, the use of slidable swaging dies 8-8, the mechanism for operating those dies (not shown) and the mechanism for rotating the mandrel 90 (also not shown) will be well understood by anyone skilled in the art and therefore, it is not necessary to illustrate such mechanisms.

In FIG. 4 I have shown, in more detail, how the swaging dies 8-8 press opposite sides of the barrel 2 against the threaded sides 9-9 of the mandrel and part of the tool die block 11 is shown in this illustration. In FIG. 5 I have shown, more in detail, the retracted positions of the swaging dies and the rotated position of the mandrel to illustrate that the mandrel may now be free axially, and without rotation, withdrawn from the barrel of the nut. Thus it Will be seen that for very little cost of tooling and for almost no extra operating time, the nut can be completely formed and threaded in a conventional press.

While the threads in my nut, formed by my improved method, are not continuous around the inside of the barrel, I have found that for most nut and bolt applications that the opposed segments cooperate with the thread on a bolt and have enough interengagement holding power for the average bolt application.

While I have illustrated a preferred novel method of forming threads in a nut, my invention is best described by the following claims.

I claim:

1. The method of forming partial threads on the inside wall only of a nut which comprises inserting, into an aperture in said nut surrounded by said wall, a mandrel having threads at opposite sides and having unthreaded opposite sides a shorter distance apart than the threaded sides and at right angles to the threaded sides, squeezing the inside wall of the nut against the threaded sides of the mandrel by the use of opposed unthreaded swaging dies to flatter portions of the wall of the nut and form partial threads in the inner surface only of said wall, rotating one of said nut and mandrel relative to the other to bring the unthreaded sides of the mandrel opposite the threaded portions in the wall and then moving one axially relative to the other free of any rotating motion, thereby to remove the nut from the mandrel.

2. The method of forming threads on the inside Wall of a sheet metal nut, in the same machine as forms the nut, which first comprises drawing a sheet metal blank into a cup shaped portion having a barrel with an inside wall to be threaded, then inserting into an aperture in said nut surrounded by said wall, a mandrel having threads at opposite sides and having unthreaded opposite sides a shorter distance apart than the threaded sides and at right angles to the threaded sides, squeezing the inside wall of the nut against the threaded sides of the mandrel Patented Oct. 31, 1961 by tliemsa of apposed swaging dies to form partial threads References Cited in'the file of this patent insaid wall, rotating one of said nut and mandre1 rela: 4 t i tive to the other to bring the unthreaded sides of the UNITED STATES PATENTS mandrel opposite the threaded portions in the wall and 856,316 Thurston June 11, 1907 thenkmoying eneraxially relatiyeto'the other free of. ny 5 1,2 1,014 Dorgan A r. 2, 1918 mutating. motion thereby to remove the nut from the 1949 923 Unke Man 6 1934 mandrel. i i n'nu'

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US856316 *Feb 25, 1905Jun 11, 1907Henry A FowlerExtensible curtain-rod and method of making.
US1261014 *Mar 26, 1917Apr 2, 1918William T DorganProcess for forming threaded nuts.
US1949923 *Sep 9, 1930Mar 6, 1934Unke Herman AApparatus for forming lugs in thread protectors
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3218598 *Dec 28, 1961Nov 16, 1965United Carr IncPrinted circuit board and lamp socket combination
US3234986 *Oct 24, 1963Feb 15, 1966Besly Welles CorpMeans for threadedly joining two members
US3314326 *Oct 20, 1964Apr 18, 1967Republic Ind CorpSelf-threading nut with interrupted threads
US3344787 *Aug 13, 1964Oct 3, 1967Truelove & Maclean IncHypodermic needle holders
US3357293 *Sep 15, 1965Dec 12, 1967Tinnerman Products IncSealed self-threading cap nut
US3359581 *Jun 8, 1965Dec 26, 1967Senediak JosephKey threading devices
US3463046 *Dec 11, 1967Aug 26, 1969Emhart CorpBlind fastening rivet and method of making same
US3877341 *Feb 26, 1973Apr 15, 1975Amerace Esna CorpUltra-lightweight metallic threaded fasteners
US4080570 *Nov 3, 1976Mar 21, 1978Sangamo Weston, Inc.Panel mounting for electrical device
US4416142 *Aug 31, 1981Nov 22, 1983Olin CorporationApparatus for simultaneously forming a cap member with internal threads
US4781507 *Aug 13, 1987Nov 1, 1988Duenas Oswaldo AQuick acting threaded fastener assembly
US4786245 *Mar 13, 1987Nov 22, 1988The Continental Group, Inc.Blow molding machine
US4860570 *Jun 10, 1988Aug 29, 1989Whipple Patent Management CorporationLow tonnage high quality thread stamping
US5139380 *Nov 28, 1990Aug 18, 1992Pac FastenersScalloped nut and method of construction
US5181310 *Feb 24, 1992Jan 26, 1993Leviton Manufacturing Company, Inc.Method of making a threaded insert assembly
US5318570 *Jun 11, 1991Jun 7, 1994Advanced Osseous Technologies, Inc.Ultrasonic tool
US5324297 *Mar 5, 1991Jun 28, 1994Advanced Osseous Technologies, Inc.Ultrasonic tool connector
US5382251 *Feb 14, 1992Jan 17, 1995Biomet, Inc.Plug pulling method
US6591657 *Jun 19, 2000Jul 15, 2003Kabushiki Kaisha Somic IshikawaMethod of manufacturing ball joint
US6702536Sep 28, 2001Mar 9, 2004Illinois Tool Works Inc.Threaded fastener nut with anti-cross threading radiused features
US6908272Sep 8, 2003Jun 21, 2005Illinois Tool Works Inc.Threaded fastener nut with anti-cross threading radiused features and tactile feedback features
US8409021 *Nov 12, 2009Apr 2, 2013Iwai Metal (America) Co., Ltd.Method for manufacturing fitting including blind nut and tap tool for use in this method
US20110111868 *Nov 12, 2009May 12, 2011Iwai Methal (America) Co., Ltd.Method for manufacturing fitting including blind nut and tap tool for use in this method
DE3843772A1 *Dec 24, 1988Jul 5, 1990Bosch Gmbh RobertMethod for the production of threads in drawn holes in sheet metal
DE19511684A1 *Mar 30, 1995Oct 2, 1996Peri GmbhAlignment or righting post for buildings
DE19725359A1 *Jun 16, 1997Dec 17, 1998Abb Patent GmbhVerfahren zur Herstellung von Hülsen mit Muttergewindesegmenten und derart gefertigte Hülse
EP0885669A2 *May 8, 1998Dec 23, 1998ABB PATENT GmbHMethod of making sleeves with femal thread segments and thus obtained sleeves
EP2218536A1 *Feb 4, 2010Aug 18, 2010HILTI AktiengesellschaftMethod for moulding an internal thread on a base body
Classifications
U.S. Classification470/25, 29/510, 29/517, 411/429, 470/85, 411/437
International ClassificationB21K1/56, B21K1/66, B21D53/00, B21D53/24, B21K1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21K1/66, B21K1/56, B21D53/24
European ClassificationB21K1/66, B21D53/24, B21K1/56