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Publication numberUS3006023 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1961
Filing dateApr 21, 1960
Priority dateApr 21, 1960
Publication numberUS 3006023 A, US 3006023A, US-A-3006023, US3006023 A, US3006023A
InventorsWorthington Samuel L
Original AssigneeWorthington Samuel L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination daubing and polishing device
US 3006023 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 31, 1961 s. WORTHINGTON 3,

COMBINATION DAUBING AND POLISHING DEVICE Filed April 21, 1960 INVENTOR. SAMUEL L.WORTHN TON y 6 H s ATTORNEY S f; thdddZB Z. A J a a .Y ,r 7 7 E Patented Get. 31, 1951 her remains almost completely unsoiled by the polish so 3, n as to serve suitably as a buffer for shoes. CQRWENATIQN AND PQEMSRHN The features of the present invention which are be- Samuel L. Worthington, I621 Fuller Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah Filed Apr. 21, 1960, Ser. No. 23,774 9 Claims. (Cl. -566) This invention relates to devices for daubing and polish ing shoes and, more particularly, to a new and improved device of the type described wherein the device may be used to accomplish both daubing and polishing operations by a single working surface.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved device wherein the same may be used to accomplish the daubing and polishing of shoes, for example.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the type described wherein but a single working surface of the cellular member thereof need be employed to accomplish both daubing and polishing functions.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the type described wherein a portion of the cellular member of the same is pro-impregnated with a temporarily liquified paste-polish, which polish will set up in the cellular member of the device and be utilizable for daubing shoes by means of the operator merely compressing the cellular member a desired degree upon the shoe, and with the same working surface of the cellular member being subsequently utilizable as a polisher.

A further object of the present invention is to provide necessary, open, pin-hole conducting apertures in the compressible cellular member of the device, and this in such a manner that the conduction of polish therethrough will not soil that portion of the cellular member adjacent the work surface thereof.

According to the present invention, the combination daubing and polishing device consists of a simple cap, a container, and a cellular member seated in the container and extending outwardly therefrom. The cellular member may be thought of as comprising a storage portion pro-impregnated with a temporarily liquified paste polish and a conducting portion, the latter unimpregnated therewith but supplied with conducting apertures leading from the paste storage portion of the cellular member to the work surface thereof. These conductive apertures serve to permit the paste polish deposited in the storage portion of the cellular member to exude during compression of the cellular member; experiment has shown that the paste polish will tend to return to the storage portion of the cellular member when compressive forces are removed. It has been found that, upon such removal, the working surface of the cellular member remains dry so as to enable the same to polish a previously daubed portion of the shoe by suitable scuffing strokes.

In manufacture, the temporarily liquified paste polish is introduced into the cellular member (mounted within the container) by a syringe, the latter bein operated to cause a pro-impregnation of the cellular member to a level near the lip of the container. Subsequently, a plurality of hot needles are introduced through the clean portion of a cellular member and down into or at least in proximity with the pro-impregnated, storage portion of the cellular member. These pin-hole aperture producing needles are preferably hot so as to sear or seal the side walls of the apertures, thereby keeping the same open and preventing polish traveling therein from seeping into the unimpregnated portion of a cellular member; as a consequence, this upper portion of the cellular memlieved to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the device of the present invention when in stored condition.

FIGURE 2 is an elevation, partially broken away for purposes of clarity, of the cap of the device.

FIGURE 3 is an elevation of the device of the present invention when the cap of FIGURE 2 is removed therefrom.

FEGURE 4 is a top plan of the structure shown in FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a vertical section taken along the line 55 in FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 6 illustrates the device when the same is used to apply a polishing agent to the persons shoe.

FIGURE 7 illustrates the manner in which the device is used to polish the wearers shoes in a series of rapid, scuffing strokes.

In lGURE-S 15 the device It) is shown to include a cap 11, a cup-configured container 12, a resilient cellular member 13, and a quantity of a paste-polish, polishing agent 14.

Cap 11 is preferably cylindrical and includes a plurality of threads 15 at its lip 16 for threadably engaging the threads 15 of cup-configured container 12. The cap 11 and container 12. are advantageously fabricated from a suitable thermoplastic material, for example, such as that going under the trade name Polyethylene. The configurations thereof are illustrated and are self-explanatory.

It has been found through experimentation that the resilient cellular member 13 may be fabricated from the cellular material currently going under the trade name Polyurethane. A simple cellulose material cannot be used for member 13 since the latter must have the following characteristics: It should have resiliency sufiicient to conform to shoe contour when a person applies the same to a shoe for daubing purposes; it should have sulfilent rigidity so that the forces which are built up in the material as a result of slight compression of the cellular member against the shoe will be transmitted to the pastepolish contained therein so as to travel up the pin-hole passages thereof (hereinafter to be explained) and exude from the working surface S of member 13 for daubing purposes; finally, the material should be of sufficient absorbtive qualities that it will store a sufiicient amount of pre-liquitied paste-polish without saturating the upper portion of the cellular member. In all of this, however, it should be remembered that the cells of the member exist for purposes of resiliency and storage only and do not conduct the polish material to any substantial degree (except under the pressures used during the pro-impregnation process).

In manufacturing the device the resilient, cellular member 13 is seated in container 12 upon adhesive G. A syringe is then inserted in member 13 to introduce under pressure a preheated temporarily liquified paste polish at the bottom of container 12. As more and more of the impregnation substance (paste polish) is introduced, the level of impregnation will advance upwardly until it nearly reaches the top of the container. At this point the syringe is removed. (-If desired, the syringe may be preheated also so as (l) to insure that the paste polish introduced into the cellular member 13 is thoroughly liquified and (2) to sear the aperture made by it for the purposes hereinafter set forth.) The rare-impregnated portion of cellular member 13 is designated as P in the drawings.

After the impregnation is accomplished a plurality of needles are introduced into a work surface S of cellular member 13 and through conducting portion C. The needles, of any cross-section are used for providing apertures 17 and are preferably hot so that the side walls thereof are scared. This insures more or less permanently open apertures for the exudation of polish when under pressure. It also insures that polish coming up through the apertures will not seep out into the side areas of conducting portion C of cellular member 13. (Glue, dope or other means may also be used to accomplish this sealing.)

It will be noted in the drawings that cellular member 13 is of such size that when cap 11 and 12 are secured together, the cellular member 13 will be compressed. This is desirable since, in being under compression, cellular member 13 will tend to exude polish to the work surface S thereof; when the cap is removed the polish is immediately available for daubing.

FIGURE 6 illustrates that in order to accomplish the daubing operation, the user will press down upon device 19 in the direction of force vectors P so that the cellular member 13 conforms to the configiration of the shoe to which polish is being applied. This slight pressure accomplishes three things. In the first place, the pressure tends to liquify, at least partially so, the pastepolish agent 14 in FIGURE 5. In the second place, the pressure exerted upon the cellular member 13 tends to force the polish material to exude outwardly through pin-hole openings 17 to work surface S. In the third place, the compression of cellular member 13 brings work surface S thereof down to the reservoir of polish contained in portion P of cellular member 13 so that this polish is immediately available for daubing.

Once the pressure is released from the device it), the same may be used as a polisher by the hand wisking the device over the surface to be polished in a series of rapid, slightly scufling strokes. Polishing is enabled since, once the pressure is removed from the cellular member 13, the polish will tend to return to the interior of the cellular member and, perhaps more important, will cause the removal of Work surface S from the reservoir of polish combined in portion P. Additionally, the upper portion C of cellular member 13, and particularly the work surface S thereof, will give up all of its polish to the shoe within a very few wisking strokes so that the surface S is almost immediately useful as a polisher.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects, and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

I claim:

1. A combination daubing and polishing device having a single working surface, said device including, in combination, a cup-configured container; a resilient, cellular member having a polish storage portion, pre-impregnated with a temporarily liquified, paste polish, disposed within said container and a polish conducting portion contiguous with said polish storage portion and extending outwardly therefrom beyond said container to terminate in a combination, daubing and polishing, work surface; and a cap releasably engaging said container, cooperating therewith to encase said resilient, cellular member, said resilient, cellular member being provided with at least one pin-hole aperture extending from said work surface into said polish storage portion of said resilient cellular member.

2. A device according to claim 1 wherein said aperture is provided with a sealed wall.

3. A device according to claim 1 wherein said aperture is provided with a sealed wall.

4. A device according to claim 1 wherein said resilient, cellular member is compressed by said cap when the latter is in its intended engagement with said container.

5. A combination daubing and polishing device having a single working surface, said device including, in combination, a cup-configured container; a resilient, cellular member having a polish storage portion, preimpregnated with a temporarily liquified, paste polish, disposed within said container and a polish conducting portion contiguous with said polish storage portion and extending outwardly therefrom beyond said container to terminate in a combination, daubing and polishing, work surface; and a cap releasably engaging said container, cooperating therewith to encase said resilient, cellular member, said resilient, cellular member being provided with a plurality of pin-hole apertures extending from said work surface into said polish storage portion of said resilient, cellular member.

6. A combination daubing and polishing device having a single working surface, said device including, in combination, a cup-configured container; a resilient, cellular member having a polish storage portion, pre-impregnated with a temporarily liquified, paste polish, disposed within said container and a polish conducting portion contiguous with said polish storage portion and extending outwardly therefrom beyond said container to terminate in a combination, daubing and polishing, Work surface; and a cap releasably engaging said container, cooperating therewith to encase said resilient, cellular member, said resilient, cellular member being provided with at least one pinhole aperture having a sealed wall and extending from said work surface into the interior of said resilient, cellular member.

7. A combination daubing and polishing device including, in combination, a container; resilient, cellular means having a polish storage portion, PIC-il'lll'llfigllfltfid with a temporarily liquified, paste polish, disposed within said container and a polish conducting portion contiguous with said polish storage portion and extending outwardly therefrom beyond said container to terminate in a combination, daubing and polishing, work surface, said resilient, cellular means thereby providing in said work surface a polishing surface when under reduced compression and a daubing surface when under increased compression; and a cap releasably engaging said container, cooperating therewith to encase said resilient, cellular means, said resilient, cellular means being provided with at least one pin-hole aperture extending from said work surface thereof into said polish storage portion of said cellular means.

8. A device according to claim 5 wherein said apertures have sealed walls.

9. A device according to claim 5 wherein said apertures have seared walls.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,567,111 Burr Dec'. 29, 1925 1,658,845 Hinds Feb. 14, 1928 2,234,558 Huston Mar. 11, 1941 2,596,725 Robbins May 13, 1952 2,789,301 Harvey Apr. 23, 1957 2,945,250 Worthington July 19, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 742,615 Great Britain Dec. 30, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1567111 *May 19, 1925Dec 29, 1925Burr William BLubricating device
US1658845 *Sep 28, 1925Feb 14, 1928Hinds Hubert DOiling pad
US2234558 *Nov 13, 1936Mar 11, 1941Tom HustonCombined dispensing and applying device
US2596725 *Jul 5, 1947May 13, 1952Clarence BentleyInk pad
US2789301 *Jul 25, 1955Apr 23, 1957Harvey Salmon CPolishing device
US2945250 *Oct 20, 1958Jul 19, 1960Worthington Samuel LCombination daubing and polishing device or the like
GB742615A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3094735 *Aug 9, 1961Jun 25, 1963Hanlon Patrick GCleaning device and method of making same
US3161903 *May 13, 1963Dec 22, 1964Worthington Samuel LShoe daubing and polishing device
US3463302 *Sep 20, 1967Aug 26, 1969Preston Pearl MPackaged disposable lotion filled applicator
US5896616 *Nov 3, 1997Apr 27, 1999Egl 1, Inc.Tire protectant applicator
US5987694 *Feb 12, 1999Nov 23, 1999Egl 1 IncTire protectant applicator
US6315482Nov 4, 1998Nov 13, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyApplicator for applying and distributing substances to target surfaces
US6322271Aug 10, 2000Nov 27, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyApplicator for applying and distributing substances to target surfaces
US6325565 *Nov 4, 1998Dec 4, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyAnti-perspirant/deodorant applicator
US6406206Aug 10, 2000Jun 18, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyApplicator for applying and distributing substances to target surfaces
US6817801May 14, 2003Nov 16, 2004The Valvoline Company, A Division Of Ashland, Inc.Automotive interior liquid applicator
US6945722May 14, 2003Sep 20, 2005The Valvoline Company, A Division Of Ashland, Inc.Combination tire sidewall protectant dispenser and applicator
US7658565Sep 20, 2005Feb 9, 2010Ashland Licensing And Intellectual Property, LlcCombination tire sidewall protectant dispenser and applicator
US20040228670 *May 14, 2003Nov 18, 2004Todd ColburnCombination tire sidewall protectant dispenser and applicator
US20040228672 *May 14, 2003Nov 18, 2004The Valvoline Company, A Division Of Ashland Inc.Automotive interior liquid applicator
US20050229343 *Apr 12, 2002Oct 20, 2005Padtech AsDevice for applying liquid or creamy substances
US20060062629 *Sep 20, 2005Mar 23, 2006Todd ColburnCombination tire sidewall protectant dispenser and applicator
US20080253824 *Apr 11, 2008Oct 16, 2008Wen-Chen SuTire dressing applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.94, 401/266
International ClassificationA47L23/00, A47L23/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/04
European ClassificationA47L23/04