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Publication numberUS3006057 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1961
Filing dateJan 2, 1958
Priority dateJan 2, 1958
Publication numberUS 3006057 A, US 3006057A, US-A-3006057, US3006057 A, US3006057A
InventorsWaite Philip C
Original AssigneeWalte Carpet Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor covering
US 3006057 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. c. wAlTE 3,006,057

FLOOR COVERING 2 Sheets-SheetI 1 Oct. 31, 1961 Filed Jan. 2, 195s 1 my @smi INVENTOR. 6242@ P. c. wAlTE FLOOR covERING Oct. 3l, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 2, 195e lll 3,606,057 FLGR CJERING Philip C. Waite, Gshkosh, Wis., assignor to Waite Carpet Company, a corporation of Wisconsin Filed Jan. 2, w58, Ser. No. 706,619 6 Claims. (El. 21g-78) This invention relates to floor coverings and has for a general object the provision of novel iioor coverings of improved appearance and wearing charac-teristics.

Another object is to provide a new and improved iioor covering including a base of carpet quality and texture having spaced groups of pile of contrasting texture thereon covering portions of the base while leaving other portions uncovered to provide a double textured appearance.

A further object is to provide a new and improved floor covering including a base of carpet having spaced groups of pile thereon covering portions of the base while leaving other portions uncovered, the quantity and disposition of the pile being such that the pile takes the principal wear on the covering.

Another object is to provide a new and improved door covering comprising a base of dat woven carpet of coarse texture having groups of yarn tufts anchored in the lbase to provide groups of pile covering approximately half the upper surface of the base, spaced to receive the principal wear on the covering, and contrasting with the appearance of uncovered portions of the base to provide a twin textured appearance.

An additional object is to provide a new and improved door covering including a base of woven carpet having multiple ply yarn warp strands and weft strands of iiber together providing a relatively firm base of coarse texture, and weftwise rows of tufts stitched into the base, reinforcing the covering weftwise, and providing weftwise rows or bands of relatively soft pile at least some of which are spaced from adjacent rows so as to cover approximately half of the base for taking the principal wear on the covering while leaving portions of the base uncovered, said pile rows having a textured appearance contrasting with the texture of uncovered portions of the base.

Another object is to provide a new and improved door covering of the type described which is economical to manufacture and wherein the appearance of the covering is enhanced with use.

Other objects and advantages will become readily apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. l is a fragmentary top plan view of a door covering illustrating a preferred form of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional View taken at about the line 2 2 of FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken at a-bout the line 3 3 of FIG. l;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan View of the floor covering illustrated in FIGS. l, 2 and 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary top plan view illustrating another iloor covering embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a `bottom plan View of the floor covering illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken at about the line 7-7 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary plan View illustrating a further ernbodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary plan view illustrating another embodiment of the invention.

While illustrative embodiments of the invention are shown in the drawings and will be described in detail herein, the invention is susceptible of embodiment in db? Patented ct. 3l, i961 many dierent forms, and it should be understood that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exempliiication of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiments illustrated. The scope of the invention will be pointed out in the appended claims.

Referring now to the drawings in more detail, a preferred form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 4 comprises a base of carpet weight, texture and quality, including warp strands 10 and weft strands il which may be woven into the base illustrated by means of a conventional loom. Preferably, the individual weft strands comprise a single continuous strand which repeatedly traverses the width of the base, being reversed at the end of each pass across the base as seen at 11a. The base is woven in -a separate operation, and after completion is provided with rows of tufting 12 stitched or punched into the base -by conventional tuftingv or punching machines to provide weftwise rows of pile covering only portions of the base, approximately half, and spaced to take the principal wear on the floor covering while leaving other portions of the base uncovered.

An important aspect of the invention lies in the contrasting textures of the base and the pile which together give the floor covering a rich textural appearance that may be described as twin texture or double texture. Accordingly, the individual components of the floor covering and their manner of combination are important.

In the preferred embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 4, each warp strand comprises four ply yarn of cotton, though other types of yarn may be used. The four plies, shown at 10u, 10b, 10c and 10d, are twisted into a rather tight single strand. Preferably, each warp strand is made multi-colored by utilizing yarn plies of different colors. The various warp strands in the base may all be similar, or involve different color combinations, or some may be a single color, or if desired all may be a single color. In a preferred embodiment, for example, one warp strand may utilize one ply of white yarn, a second ply of beige colored yarn, and third and fourth plies of a tan color. The adjacent warp strand may utilize one ply of white yarn, a second ply of light brown yarn and two plies of a dark chocolate brown yarn. Warp strands such as these may be alternated across the width of the base. Preferably, the base includes varying color yarn and preferably the various colors are compatible, blending colors though they can be widely contrasting colors such as white, green, red, yellow, etc. The use of multiple ply yarn in each Warp strand provides relatively coarse strands which, as shown in the drawings that are approximately at full scale, occur at the rate of about 41/2 per inch.

The weft strands y1li preferably comprise a single ply of ber commonly described as twisted or formed paper twine, although other materials may be utilized. The color or colors employed in the weft strands may be the same as, blending with, or contrasting with the warp colors. In a preferred embodiment, utilizing warp strands involving the colors white, beige, tan and brown as described above, the weft strands are a medium grey color. As will be seen in the drawings, the weft strands are also relatively cot-irse, though less coarse than the warp strands, and occur at the rate of approximately 31/2 per inch.

The warp and weft strands are rather tightly woven into the pattern illustrated, providing a relatively flat, iirm base which in and of itself is of carpet quality. That is, the weight, weave, and texture of the base are such that the base may be utilized alone as a floor carpet of pleasing appearance and good wearing characteristics. In the embodiment of FIGS. l to 4, the weft strands remain relatively straight during the weaving processes. That is, each strand and all strands lie substantially in a single plane and the warp strands rove over and under the weft strands, and due to theV coarseness of the warp and weft strand each rise of a warp strand, from under a weft over'the succeeding weft and down under the next weft, produces a small bun or biscuit 13 with portions of all four sides of the bun or biscuit, particularly at the sides of the warp strand, exposed so that the base has a waie-like three dimensional appearance and is rather rough when felt by hand. The three dimensional appearanceis due principally to the coarseness of the warp' and weft strands, and because of the tight weave, the base has a decidedly coarse textural appearance which is enhanced by the multiple colors that may be utilized to give a .tweedy appearance. While some of the tweedy appearance and coarseness of the base texture diminishes with diminishing variation in colors, the weave and the materials utilized in the base provide a decidedly `rough texture even where the warp and weftstrands are of substantially uniform color.

The tufting 12, which may be loop pile or cut pile as shown, is stitched kor punched into the base in weftwise rows from the reverse side of the base, as seen at 12a. -Eaeh row of stitching is positioned between two adjacent weft strands, after every fifth weft strand as illustrated, so that the tufting is stitched principally into the yarn of the warp strands, as seen in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4. The pile stitching aids in holding the warp strands together, preventing weftwise separation of these strands, and reinforces the floor covering weftwise so that while usually made in standard widths it may be cut longitudinally, along the warp, without unravelling, to provide narrower widths for use as carpeting. The manufacture of the base and the addition of the tufting in separate operations enables the use of conventional efcient machines for each operation so that the entire oor covering is formed in an economical manner to produce an extremely durable product of unusually pleasing appearance.

Preferably the tufting comprises cotton yarn though other materials such as wool, rayon, viscose, acetate and nylon could be used, and each weft strand is comprised of a plurality of individual threads. For example, in a preferred form, the tufting yarn comprises l2 separate threads of No. 8 yarn twisted into a single strand. The tufting yarn is stitched weftwise so that individual stitches are closely adjacent, as seen best at 12a in FIG. 4, and when the yarn is cut there is no space weftwise between adjacent individual tufts. After the tufting is cut the yarn may be fluffed or bloomed out by any one of a number of different methods which may include passing the covering over a steam table, over jets of moisture, or over jets of air, and may include the use of revolving brushes. After the tlufng, the threads of each tuft bend and fall in Yrandom directions, thereby spreading to form pile rows or bands on the base having a width about equal to the warpwise spacing between rows so that the pile covers about halfthe base and takes the principle wear on the Hoor covering, there being no uncovered portions of the base wide enough to directly receive a shoe print. The base is thus protected from wear, adding longer life to the oor covering.

The color of the tufting yarn may be similar to, blending with or contrasting with the color or colors of the base. Preferably, the color of the tufting blends with the color or colors of the base to give a soft, warm appearance. For example, in a preferred form using warp yarn colors varying from white to dark brown as described and weft strands of grey referred to, the tufting yarn may be of beige color similar to the beige of the ywarp yarn plies. The tufting provides a pile rather soft and rather smooth to feel, falling in casual lines on the base and contrasting with the coarse texture of the relatively rm base. The over-all eifect gives a rich textural eil.

appearance which may be called twin texture or double texture, providing a floor covering of distinctly enhanced appearance. Foot or shoeprints do not show on the pile as in completely tufted carpeting, and increased traf- Atic enhances the beauty of the oor covering as it seems to polish or shine the pile.

While the embodiment of FIGS. l to 4 illustrate a preferred form of the iioor carpeting, the arrangement and spacing of the tufting may vary from that shown. For example, individual rows of tufting may be closely spaced to provide a group or band of tufting comprising several rows which may be spaced warpwise on the base from similar or different bands of tufting. Such bands may all comprise a single uniform color of yarn, or the different bands may lbe dilferent colors, or a single band may utilize different colors of yarn to produce a rainbow like effect within the band. FIGS. 5 to 7 illustrate examples including a band of pile 15 which includes 7 rows of stitched tufts positioned between 6 weft strands, two rows of stitching being crowded between adjacent weft strands in some cases, as seen at .16. In another example, a band of pile 18 includes five rows of stitching positioned successively between adjacent weft strands as seen at 13a. rIlhe spacing between bands such as those illustrated at 15 and 18 may vary somewhat, but in all cases, the pile covers at least approximately half the surface of the base, and the spacing between groups of pile is such that the pile is calculated to take the principal wear on the oor covering. In FIG. 9, pile rows are grouped in bands i9, each of which may include two or three rows of tufting spaced successively in each band with three weft strands between adjacent rows. This spacing leaves a slight gap as at 19a between rows in each band. The spacing between bands may vary within the limits dened. While only weftwise rows of tufting have been illustrated, it will be understood that the rows may extend warpwise instead, or both weftwise and warp- Wise, and that other patterns may be utilized.

The com-position of the individual warp strands and weft strands employed in the base may vary from that illustrated in FIGS. l to 7. For example, in a modied form of the invention illustrated in FIG. 8 each Warp comprises a strand of twisted four ply yarn Z0 as seen at 26a, 201'), 29C and 20d, with two fiber strands 21 and 22 alongside the yarn strand. The iiber strands are usually each of a single color but the colors of the two strands may be diiferent and match, blend with, or contrast with other strands in the base. The ber strands adda further variation to the ytextural appearance of the base. In FIG. 8, each weft comprises a ber strand 24 having a roving yarn strand 25 wound about the ber strand.

In the modilication of FIG. 9, each Warp is similar to that in FIG. 8, utilizing a yarn strand 27 and liber strands 28, except that the yarn strand 27 is three ply as seen at 27a, 271) and 27C. Obviously, other multiple ply yarn may be used. In this modification, the Wefts may each comprise two strands of fiber 29 and 30 twisted together into a single thread, preferably with the fiber strands being of different colors.

Iclaim:

l. A iloor covering, comprising, a base of ilat woven carpet having warp strands of four-ply, multicolored yarn and substantially evenly spaced weft strands of twisted paper twine providing a relatively rm base of carpet quality having a relatively coarse texture, and a plurality of spaced rows of yarn tufts stitched weftwvise in the base principally in the warp strands and between the weft strands one approximately adjacent every ifth weft strand reinforcing the covering weftwise and providing spaced bands of relatively soft pile of relatively line texture on the base each band having a width approximately equal the spacing between bands so that only approximately half the base is covered with pile for receiving the principal wear on the floor covering and having a textured appearance contrasting with the texture of uncovered portions of the base.

2. A oor covering, comprising, a base carpet of interwoven multiple ply Warp strands and coarse weft strands providing a relatively lirrn base of carpet quality having a relatively coarse interwoven texture, and a plurality of transverse rows of yarn tufts anchored in the base and providing spaced bands of relatively soft pile of relatively ine texture covering only approximately half the base and spaced to receive the principal wear on the floor covering, the yarn of said tufts comprising `a plurality of individual threads falling yin random directions on the base so that the pile has a textured appearance contrasting with the coarse interwoven texture of uncovered portions of the base.

3. A oor covering, comprising, a base of Hat woven carpet having warp strands of multiple-ply yarn and weft strands of twisted paper twine providing a relatively iirm base of carpet quality having a relatively coarse texture, and a plurality of rows of yarn tufts stitched weftwise in the base principally in the warp strands `and between the weft strands reinforcing the covering weftwise and providing spaced bands of relatively soft pile of relatively ne texture on the base each band having a width approximately equal the spacing between bands so that only `approximately half the base is covered with pile, the bands being spaced for receiving the principal Wear on the oor covering and having a textured appearance contrasting with the texture of uncovered portions of the base.

4. A floor covering, comprising, `a base of fiat woven carpet having warp strands of four-ply multi-colored warn and substantially evenly spaced werft strands of twisted paper twine providing a relatively firm base of carpet quality having `a relatively coarse texture, and a plurality of multiple row groups of yarn tufts stitched weftwise in the base principally in the warp strands and between the weft strands reinforcing the base weftwise and providing spaced bands of relatively soft pile of relatively fine texture on the base, each band having a width approximately equal the spacing between bands so that only approximately half the base is covered with pile, the bands being spaced for receiving the principal wear on the oor covering and having a textured appearance contrasting with the texture of uncovered portions of the base.

5. A floor covering, comprising, a base of Hat woven carpet having war-ps each including a twisted multipleply multi-colored yarn strand and ber strands alongside the yarn strand, said carpet having wefts each including a twisted fiber strand and a roving yarn strand around the iiber strand, thereby providing a relatively firm base of carpet quality having a relatively coarse texture, and a plurality of spaced rows of yarn tufts stitched weftwise in the base principally in the warp strands and between the weft strands one approximately adjacent every lifth weft strand reinforcing the base weftwise Iand providing spaced bands of relatively soft pile of relatively line texture on the base, each band having a width approximately equal the spacing between bands so that only approximately half the base is covered with pile for receiving the principal wear on the lioor covering and having a textured appearance contrasting with the texture of uncovered portions ofthe base.

6. A floor covering, comprising, a base of flat woven carpet having warps each including a twisted multipleply multi-colored yarnstrand and liber strands alongside the yarn strand, said canpet having wefts each including twisted ber strands of different colors, thereby providing a relatively lirrn base of carpet quality `having a relatively coarse texture, and a plurality of multiple row groups of yarn tufts stitched weftwise in the base principally in the warp strands `and bet-Ween the weft strands reinforcing the base weftwise and providing spaced bands of relatively soft pile of relatively line texture on the base contrasting with the texture of uncovered portions of the base, the width of the bands being such that only approximately half the base is covered with pile, the bands being spaced for receiving the principal Wear on the oor covering.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 585,385 Hornig June 29, 1897 1,901,840 Cooper et al. Mar. 14, 1933 2,144,555 Sudell Ian. 17, 1939 2,235,732 Sudell Mar. 18, 1941 2,360,398 Case Oct. 17, 1944 2,448,928 Stahl Sept. 7, 1948 2,745,443 Keen May 15, 1956 2,766,506 Rice Oct. 16, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,126,254 France Nov. 19, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US585385 *Aug 6, 1896Jun 29, 1897 Gottfried hornig
US1901840 *Mar 28, 1932Mar 14, 1933Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co IncReversible tuft pile carpet or rug
US2144555 *Mar 1, 1937Jan 17, 1939France IndBath mat, etc.
US2235732 *Feb 18, 1939Mar 18, 1941France IndPile fabric
US2360398 *Mar 27, 1944Oct 17, 1944Deltox Rug CompanyRug and the method of making the same
US2448928 *Sep 28, 1945Sep 7, 1948Libertyville Textiles IncRug
US2745443 *Dec 29, 1953May 15, 1956Collins & Aikman CorpPile fabrics
US2766506 *Jan 13, 1956Oct 16, 1956Mahasco Ind IncPatterned sewn tufted fabric
FR1126254A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3110905 *Sep 26, 1961Nov 19, 1963Lees & Sons Co JamesTufted pile fabric comprising a flat woven synthetic plastic backing
US6994124 *Jan 23, 2004Feb 7, 2006Chen FengThree dimensional waffleweave and stitching method thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/410, 112/415, 139/391
International ClassificationD03D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2331/02, D10B2201/02, D03D15/00, D10B2211/02, D10B2503/04, D03D11/00, D10B2201/24, D03D15/0033, D03D27/00
European ClassificationD03D15/00F, D03D27/00, D03D11/00, D03D15/00