Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3006258 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1961
Filing dateDec 29, 1958
Priority dateDec 29, 1958
Publication numberUS 3006258 A, US 3006258A, US-A-3006258, US3006258 A, US3006258A
InventorsTheodore B Jochem
Original AssigneeCutler Hammer Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material handling system
US 3006258 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 31, 1961 T. B. JOCHEM 3,006,258

MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEM Filed Dec. 29, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 o O O 252 5 5 a 6 8 O 249 3 g g o z O 2.70 5 5 Shem/2 32. oc/emw 4 8 8 O gag M Oct. 31, 1961 T. B. JOCHEM 3,006,253

I MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEM Filed Dec. 29, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 u Sw 2a LZ- MO 100 U unm mew coum-me CHAIN m'c aLc aac 42c 8Lc sac PR5 PRESET REL Q 5W.

Oct: 31, 1961 T. B. JOCHEM 3,006,258

MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEM Filed Dec. 29, 1958 5 SheetsSheet 5 ZICKI United States Patent 3,(i0ai,258 MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEM Theodore B. Jochem, Wauwatosa, Wis., assignor to Cutler-Hammer, Inn, Milwankee, Wis, a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 29, 1958, Ser. No. 783,413 15 Claims. (Cl. 93-93) This invention relates to material handling control systems and more particularly to systems for controlling stacking of sheet materials in accordance with predetermined programs.

While not limited thereto, the invention is especially applicable to systems for counting and stacking newspapers and the like having one folded edge and which are delivered in a high-speed overlapped stream.

Frederic E. Howdle and Charles W. Otto Patent No. 2,819,661, dated January 15, 1958, discloses a newspaper stacker and control system therefor. The stacker is located at the end of a conveyor which delivers the newspapers in partially overlapped relation with the folded edge leading. A photoelectric counter counts the newspapers as they approach the stacker and the latter forms the newspapers into batches of a preset number. As each batch is formed, the stream is intercepted and the completed batch is dropped onto a table whe-reafter the table may selectively lower to deliver the batch or may rotate 180 degrees to allow a second batch to drop on the first batch with its folded edges reversed relative to the first batch. On delivery, the table is lowered around rotating rollers which convey the bundle onto a bundle delivery conveyor. The table is then raised in preparation for the formation of a second bundle. Each batch contains the number of papers preset on the counter at the beginning of the run and each delivered bundle contains either the batch number or multiples of this number depending upon the number of table rotations as determined by the controller presetting.

It has been found desirable to provide a newspaper stacking control system whereby bundles having any desired number of newspapers may be formed automatically in a predetermined order. To this end, the present invention is an improvement over the system disclosed in the aforementioned patent.

A general object of the invention is to provide an improved stacking control'system.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide an improved programming control system for a newspaper stacker.

Another specific object of the invention is to provide such control system with improved means for automatically controlling formation of newspapers into balanced bundles wherein each bundle has a number of newspapers controlled in accordance with predetermined coded information.

A further specific object of the invention is to provide such control system with improved means affording selection of uniform stacking or programmed stacking opera tion thereof, the uniform stacking operation requiring manual presetting of control elements todetermine the number of newspapers per batch as well as the number of batches per bundle, and the programmed operation affording automatic feeding of coded information therein to variably control the number of newspapers in each succeeding batch and the number of batches in each bundle in accordance with such information.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter appear.

While the apparatus hereinafter described is effectively adapted to fulfill the objects stated, it is to be understood that I do not intend to confine my invention to the particular preferred embodiment of material handling system disclosed, inasmuch as it is susceptible of various modifications without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

The invention will now be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic side elevation view of a stacker operable in conjunction with the present invention;

FIGS. 2A and 2B diagrammatically depict a control system constructed in accordance with the present invention for operating the stacker of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 shows a number of coded cards.

The stacker shown in FIG. 1 is similar to the stacker of the aforementioned Howdle and Otto patent. The stacker is comprised of four sections including a counting section, an intercepting section, a batch stacking section and a bundle stacking and handling section.

The counting section comprises an inclined-to-horizontal conveyor indicated generally as It and a photoelectric counter having a light beam 12. As the newspapers are delivered down the inclined conveyor in overlapped relation with the folded edge leading, the change in direction of movement of the newspaper to the hori. zontal causes the trailing edge of each newspaper to flip through the light beam. Such interception of the light beam establishes a count of one for each newspaper. The count is recorded in the control system as hereinafter described in connection with FIG. 2A.

The intercepting section comprises an inclined delivery conveyor 14 terminating in a pair of pincher rolls 16, an inclined intercepting blade 18, operating mechanism 20 for the intercepting blade and operating mechanism 22 for moving the pincher rolls relative to the intercepting blade.

The batch stacking section comprises a pair of inclined stacking blades 24 in parallel relation for receiving a batch of newspapers and operating mechanism 26 for spreading the stacking blades apart to drop the batch.

The newspapers are delivered from the pincher rolls and flow beneath the intercepting blade onto the stacking blades. When a predetermined number of newspapers has been stacked on the stacking blades as counted by counter beam 12, operating mechanism 22 is actuated to trip the pincher rolls upwardly so that the succeeding newspapers are delivered onto the intercepting blade. Operating mechanism 26 opens the stacking blades to drop the batch and intercepting blade 18 is lowered by operating mechanism 20. When the stacking blades have reclosed, intercept blade 18 is retracted to deposit the intercepted newspapers on the stacking blades. Intercept blade 18 is then raised in retracted position. 'In the meantime, pincher rolls 16 have been reset and the intercepting blade is then extended to the position shown.

The bundle stacking and handling section comprises a rotatable table 28, operating mechanism 30 for rotating the table, operating mechanism 32 for lowering and raising the table and a bundle delivery conveyor 34 for conveying the bundle from the table. Each time a batch of newspapers is dropped onto the table, the latter is either rotated 18 0 degrees to receive a second batch with the folded edges reversed to form a balanced bundle or if a bundle containing only a single batch is desired, the table is lowered to convey the bundle from the table.

The operation of the stacker will be described in more detail in connection with the description of the control system hereinafter appearing. For a more detailed description of the stacker structure, reference may be had to the aforementioned Howdle and Otto patent.

Referring to the control system in FIGS. 2A and 2B,

there is shown a pair of power supply lines L1 and L2 connectable to an alternating current power supply source. A suitable power translating unit PS is connected across lines L1 and L2 for supplying the light source LS of a photoelectric counter. The counter is also provided with a photocell PC whereon the light beam 12, indicated by the broken arrow and also shown in FIG. 1, from light source LS normally impinges. The photoelectric counter is arranged to operate an input unit IU of the electronic type or the like. The output of unit IU is connected through a conductor 100 to the input of a units digit binary counting chain UD of the electronic type.

A group of units digit presetting selector switches 18, 28, 4S and 88 of the manually settable type or the like are provided for manually presetting counting chain UD, and a group of units digit presetting relays 1R, 2R, 4R and SR are provided for alternatively automatically presetting counting chain UD to receive a desired number of pulses. Each presetting switch 18, 28, 4S and 88 is provided with a movable contact arm and ten stationary contacts numbered 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. The stationary contacts through 9 of the presetting switches are connected through respective pairs of left and right conductors 1LC1RC, 2LC2RC, 4LC4RC and SLC-SRC to counting chain UD. The stationary contacts of presetting switches 18, 28, 4S and 88 are multiplied to their respective left and right conductors in a well known manner to effect a decimal to binary translation of the preset number as hereinafter more fully described.

Presetting relays 1R, 2R, 4R and 8R are provided with normally closed contacts 1R1, 2R1, 4R1 and SR! and normally open contacts 1R2, 2R2, 4R2 and 8R2, respectively. Contacts TR]. and 1R2 are connected to conductors 1LC and IRC, respectively. Contacts 2R1 and 2R2 are connected to conductors ZLC and ZRC, respectively. Contacts 4R1 and 4R2 are connected to conductors 4LC and 4R0, respectively. And contacts 8R1 and 8R2 are connected to conductors SLC and 8R0, respectively.

The output of units digit counting chain UD is connected through a conductor 162 to the input of a like tens digit counting chain ID. The tens digit circuit is also provided with presetting relays and switches PRS for presetting its associated counting chain TD. The tens digit presetting relays and switches are similar to the units digit relays and switches hereinbefore described and have been shown schematically to avoid complicating the drawings.

A master switch MS for selecting either normal or program operation of the system is shown in three portions as MSa, MSb and M50. Switch portion MSa is provided with a column of normal contacts N1 through N5 and a column of program contacts P1 through P5 and a bridging member Ba for connecting either the normal or program contacts to one another. Input contacts N1 and P1 are connected to one another, contacts N2, N3, N4 and N5 are connected to the respective movable contact arms of presetting switches 18, 28, 4S and 8S and contacts P2, P3, P4 and P5 are connected to the junctions of the aforementioned normally open and normally closed contacts of presetting relays 1R, 2R, 4R and SR, respectively.

Switch portion MS!) is similar to switch portion M841 and therefore has been shown schematically to avoid complicating the drawings. Conductor 104 is representative of a cable connecting corresponding contacts of switch MSb to presetting relays and switches PRS in the tens digit circuit. Input contacts N1 and P1 of switch MSa and corresponding input contacts of switch MSb are respectively connected through conductors 1G6 and 198 and then through conductors 116 and 11?. to an output terminal of a switch unit SU of the electronic type. The input terminal of switch unit SU is connected through a conductor I14 and normally open contacts 18CR1 of a presetting relay 18CR to a negative power supply source. Contacts 13CR1 are shunted by a normally open manual pushbutton switch PBl to afford manually presetting the units and tens counting chains.

For automatically controlling the number of papers per batch and the number of batches per bundle, there is provided a card reader CR of the well known IBM type or the like for operation in accordance with coded information on cards CD. Cards CD may be of the well known type having punched thereon units and tens codes for determining the number of papers per batch and operating codes for controlling rotation of the stacker preparatory to formation of a plural batch bundle or for delivering the bundle. The card reader is provided wit-h binary units digit contacts U1, U2, U4- and U8 and binary tens digit contacts T1, T2, T4 and T8, rotate contacts R and deliver contacts D for closure in accordance with the punched codes on each card. While the apparatus for closing these contacts may take various forms, an example thereof is a feeler mounted on the opposite side of the card from the contacts and operable to bridge the contacts at each punched aperture in the card. The apparatus for inserting each card into reading position and for thereafter ejecting such card and inserting another card is well known and therefore has not been shown. Reference may be had to FIGS. 4 and 5 of E. W. Gardner et al. Patent 2,647,581 dated August 4, 1953, for one form of apparatus whereby coded cards may be inserted, read and ejected.

Contacts U1, U2, U4 and US are connected in series with the operating coils of units presetting relays 1R, 2R, 4R and SR, respectively, across lines L1 and L2. Similarly, the contacts T1, T2, T4 and T8 are connected from line L2 to the tens presetting relays PRS. The energizing and control circuit for the card reader CR extends from line L1 through a normally open limit switch LSlSa to the card reader. Line 116 from the card reader extends through contacts P6 and P7 of master switch portion MSc to line L2 when P6 and P7 are bridged by member B0. A normally open manual pushbutton switch PB2 is connected in shunt of limit switch LS18a for manually initiating operation of the card reader.

The output of tens digit counting chain TD is connected to switch unit SU, the latter being connected through conductors 112 and 120 to input unit IU and through conductor 122 to a first delay counter lDC which in turn is connected to a second delay counter 2DC. The first and second delay counters IDC and ZDC are arranged to be operated from a conveyor operated toothed wheel 124 through a magnetic pickup 126. Power for all the counters is fed (not shown) from the power supply PS.

The units and tens digit counting chains UD and TD, the input unit IU and the switch unit SU comprise the essential portions of a well known counter identified as the Potter Instrument Company predetermined electronic counter and the details thereof have not been shown to avoid complicating the drawings. Reference may be had to John T. Potter Patent No. 2,574,283 for a detailed disclosure of the counting chains. The first and second delay counters IDC and 2DC are similar to the units and tens counters and are more fully described in the aforementioned Howdle and Otto Patent No. 2,819,661.

The control system is also provided with storage relays ZOCR, 21CR and 22CR for storing the rotate or deliver information from the card reader until it is needed as determined by the operation of limit switches in the stacker. Each relay 20CR, 21CR and 22CR is of the toggle type having a closing coil C and a tripping coil T and is constructed to close its open contacts and to open its closed contacts when one coil is energized and to maintain this condition following deenergization of such coil until the other coil is energized whereupon the contacts are restored to their first positions. Relay 20CR isshown in its closed condition and relays 21CR and 220R are shown in their tripped conditions.

First delay counter 1DC is provided with normally open contacts 1DC1 for momentary closure to operate a pincher roll trip relay 1CR which in turn controls a trip solenoid TS. Second delay counter ZDC is provided with normally open contacts 2DC1 for momentary closure to operate a batch drop relay ZCR, the latter controlling a stacking blade opening air valve solenoid AV7 as well as a table rotate relay 10CR. Relay 10CR is of the latched type having a closing coil C and a tripping coil T and is constructed to close its normally open contacts and to open its normally closed contacts when one coil is energized and to maintain this condition following deenergization of such coil until the other coil is energized whereupon the contacts are restored to their first positions. Relay 10CR is arranged to control operation not only of its own coils but is also arranged to control selective operation of table rotate air valve solenoids AV9 and AVltl, the latter etfecting rotation of the table in respectively opposite directions.

Master switch portion MSc is provided with normal contacts N6 and N7 and program contacts P6, P7, P8 and P9. A bridging member B is arranged to connect contacts N6 and N7 in the normal position of master switch MS and to connect contacts P6 to P7 in its program operating position. A bridging member Ed is arranged to connect program contacts P8 and P9 in the program operating position of the master switch and to disconnect these contacts in its normal operating position. A batch information relay 4CR is provided for selecting rotation of the table or delivery of the bundle. Relay 4CR is arranged to be controlled by a batches-per-bundle stepping switch 11CR when the master switch is in its normal operating position or .by the aforementioned storage relay 22CR when the master switch is in its program operating position. Stepping switch 11CR is provided with a normal position N and a plurality of operating positions 1, 2, 3, 4 as desired. Movable arm 11CR1 may be manually preset to determine the number of batches per bundle. A stepping brush llCRZ is arranged to be operated by a stepping coil S to effect operation of relay 4CR and deliver the bundle when such brush reaches the preset operating position. Stepping coil S is under the control of batch drop relay ZCR. Switch 11CR is further provided with a reset coil R for resetting the same to its normal position when the bundle reaches the delivery table.

A clearing relay 6CR is provided to control delivery of any newspapers that may be on the table when stacker operation is completed and also to provide table lowering during the make ready period. Relay 6CR is also arranged to control a reset relay 18CR which in turn resets the units and tens counting chains. The operating coil of relay 18CR is pulsed by a shunt capacitor C1 which is charged from rectifier bridge RB through a series resistor R1. When relay 6CR operates, the capacitor C1 discharges through the coil of relay 18CR1 momentarily operating this relay. Relay 6CR is provided with a manual pushbutton switch PB3 so that the table may be cleared of newspapers at any time as desired. A table relay 16CR and a table delay relay 3CR are provided to control operation of the table in its proper sequence. To this end, the operating coil of relay 3CR is shunted by a series connected capacitor C3 and an adjustable resistor R3 forming a time delay circuit. A table raise relay 8CR and a ready relay 9CR under the control of a table position relay 12CR are provided to control raising of the table after the bundle has been removed therefrom. To this end, the operating coil of relay 8CR is shunted by a series connected capacitor C2 and an adjustable resistor R2 forming a time delay circuit. Relays 30R, 8CR and 18CR are supplied from a rectifier bridge RB connected across lines L1 and L2.

In addition to air valve solenoids AV7, AV9 and AV10 hereinbefore described, there are provided the following air valve solenoids which are also shown in FIG. 1: AVI for lowering the intercept blade, AVZ for raising the intercept blade, AV3 for resetting the pincher rolls, AV4 for retracting the pincher rolls solenoid plunger to afford free tripping thereof, AV5 for retracting the intercept blade, AVG for advancing the intercept blade, AV8 for closing the stacking blades, AVll for lowering the table, and AV12 for raising the table.

There are also provided a plurality of limit switches also shown in FIG. 1 and operable in response to various stacker operations for controlling the latter in their proper sequence. Normally closed limit switch LSla and normally open limit switch LSlb are mechanically connected to one another as shown by the broken line in FIG. 2B for operation in unison when the stacking blades are opened to drop the batch. Limit switch LSlb controls solenoid AVI to lower the intercept blade and limit switch LSla controls solenoid AVS to retract the intercept blade. Normally open limit switch LS2 closes when the intercept blade is fully retracted and controls solenoid AVZ to raise the intercept blade and controls solenoid AV4 to retract the pincher rolls resetting plunger. Normally closed limit switch LS3a and normally open limit switch LS3!) are mechanically connected to one another for operation in unison when the table is rotated. Limit switch LS3a controls closing coil C and limit switch LS3b controls tripping coil T of relay IQCR to afiord alternate rotation of the table in opposite directions by degrees. Normally open limit switch LSfia and normally closed limit switch LS6b are mechanically connected to one another for operation in unison when the intercept blade is lowered and raised. Limit switch L865: controls solenoid AV3 to reset the pincher rolls and solenoid AVS to close the stacking blades. Limit switch LS6a also controls table relay 16CR and controls solenoid AVS in conjunction with limit switch LS1a to elfect retraction of the intercept blade only after the stacking blades have closed. Limit switch LS6b controls solenoid AV6 to advance the stacking blade. Normally open limit switches LS9a and LS9b are mechanically connected to one another for operation in unison when the bundle reaches the delivery table. Limit switch LS9a efiects resetting of batches-perbundle stepping switch illCR to its normal position and limit switch LS9b operates table raising solenoid AVIZ. Normally closed limit switch LSlOa and normally open limit switch LSlOb are mechanically connected to one another for operation in unison when table .28 is lowered and raised. Limit switch LSlOa disconnects table rotating solenoids AV9 and AV10, table lowering solenoid AVll and the operating coil of clearing relay 6CR and limit switch SLitlb operates table position relay 12CR when the table is lowered.

There are further provided a plurality of limit switches for controlling card reader CR and batch information storage relays ZtlCR, 210R and 220R. Normally open limit switch IJSlSa and normally closed limit switch LSlSb are mechanically connected to one another for operation in unison when the pincher rolls are tripped to intercept the stream. Limit switch LS18a controls card reader CR to eject the last card and to insert the next card. Limit switch LS18b prevents transfer of batch information from the card to the storage relays while a new card is being inserted. Normally closed limit switch L819 operates When the intercept blade is lowered to further delay transfer of such batch information until the control has had time to utilize the stored batch information from the preceding card. Normally closed limit switch LS20a and normally open limit switch LS20b are mechanically connected to one another for operation in unison when the intercept blade is retracted. Limit switch LSZtla still further delays such transfer of batch information while limit switch LS2tlb effects transfer of the batch information of the preceding card from the circuit of relay 210R to the circuit of relay ZZCR.

Thereafter limits switch LSZtia is restored to effect utilization of the batch information stored in the circuit of relay 220R and also effects storage of the batch information from the next card.

The specific connections of the aforementioned relay operating coils, relay contacts, air valve solenoids and limit switches will become apaprent when the individual operating circuits are traced in the description of operation hereinafter appearing.

The control system provides for either normal operation or programmed operation of the stacker as selected on master switch MS. Under normal operation, the number of papers per batch is selected beforehand on the presetting switches in the units and tens digit circuits and this number remains constant until the presetting switches are again manually reset. Also the number of batches per bundle is selected beforehand by setting arm llCRll of stepping switch lllCR on the appropriate terminal and this number remains constant until arm llCRl is again reset. Thus, if the units and tens presetting switches are preset for twenty-five papers and stepping switch arm llCRl is preset on contact No. 2, the stacker forms bundles having two batches of twenty-five papers in each batch or fifty-paper bundles.

Under programmed operation, the number of papers in each batch as well as the number of batches in each bundle are under the control of a multiplicity of punched cards CD. The consecutive cards may be coded differently so that each bundle may have any number of papers from one to a hundred, the minimum number of papers in a bundle being limited solely by the speed of the incoming stream. As each card is read, the units and tens presetting relays are operated to preset the counting chains and the information relative to rotation of the table or delivery of the bundle is stored until the stacker operation proceeds to a point wherein it accepts this information. While the punched cards have been illustrated as being punched in the binary code for the units and tens digits, it will be apparent that these cards could as well be punched in the decimal code and an appropriate translation from decimal to binary performed in order to operate the presetting relays.

The method used to preset the units and tens counting chains will now be described. Each counting chain UD and TD is of the well known electronic type known as a decade counter. Each decade counter is provided with four dual triode vacuum tubes corresponding to the four binary digits required to cover the range of O to 9 decimal digits as will be apparent from the followlng conversion table:

Decimal Binary System System In binary counting, 2 is used as the base whereby there are only two values for each binary digit, namely, 0 and 1. These values correspond to the off and on conditions, respectively, of the dual triodes in the decade counter. The four tubes in a decade counter are so connected that only onehalf of each tube can conduct current at any given instant. When the right half of a tube is conducting, the tube is in its on condition corresponding to binary digit 1 and when the left half of a tube is conducting, the tube is in its off condition corresponding to binary digit 0.

The decade counter is arranged so that it will afford an output signal only when it has reached its full count capacity, that is, ten pulses. Therefore, in order to count a given number of decimal pulses less than ten, it will be necessary to present the counter so that it Will reach its full count capacity when such given number of pulses have been received. To this end, each stage, units and tens, is first preset to the complementary-to-nine condition; that is, each stage is set to the condition that would have existed if a number of pulses equal to the difference between the given number and nine had been received by the counter. Immediately thereafter, a fugitive pulse is applied to the counter to advance the counter by one count. The result is a presetting of a two stage counter to the complementary-to-hundred number. For example, let it be assumed that the code on the punched card calls for twenty-five papers. It will be apparent that a presetting at seventy-five is required so that an output signal is afforded upon receipt of the twenty-fifth pulse. This is accomplished by first setting the units digit decade counter to a count of 4 and setting the tens digit decade counter to a count of 7 to afford a preliminary setting of 74. Immediately thereafter the fugitive pulse is automatically transmitted to the input of the units digit decade counter to advance the setting to 75. This presets the counting apparatus for receiving 25 pulses.

The preliminary setting is performed on the presetting switches or on the presetting relays, the latter being under the control of the coded cards. The presetting switches 18, 28, 3S and SS for the units digit are mechanically connected to one another as indicated by the broken lines. The stationary terminals thereof are connected to the units digit counting chain so that a setting of the switches to the desired units digit, for example 5, effects a translation to preset the counting chain to the complementary-to-nine number or 4 when a presetting pulse is subsequently applied through the switches. The tens digit switches are similarly connected to the tens counting chain.

The punched cards CD may be coded with the complementary-to-nine binary codes as shown in FIG. 3 or coded decimal digits and a translation performed to energize presetting relays 1R, 2R, 4R and BK in accordance with the complementary-to-nine digits as shown in the following table.

Preset Relay Conditions Desired Number Complementary 1B 2B 4B 8R It will be apparent from the above table that for a desired units digit 5, as in the aforementioned example, contact U4 in the card reader is closed to energize presetting relay 4R. This closes contacts 4R2 and opens contacts 4R1 to connect master switch MS through conductor 411C to units digit counting chain UD whereby, upon receipt of the presetting pulse, the right side of the third double triode is rendered conducting. Similarly, the counting chains may be first preset to any other complementary-to-nine digits in accordance with the coded cards as hereinafter described in more detail in connection with the description of operation of the system. The operation of the system will now be described.

Programmed operation Let it be assumed that the first four cards of a programmed press run are coded to afford the following results:

Card l25 papers-rotate Card 224 papersdeliver Card 327 papers-deliver Card 422 papersrotate The cards will actually vbe punched with codes in the following manner as shown in FIG. 3 wherein, looking from the bottom of each card toward the top, the digit 1 has been registered by the circular punched-out portion.

Let it also be assumed that alternating current power is supplied to lines L1 and L2, master switch MS is turned to its program operating position and that pushbutton switch PBZ is pressed to close its contacts. Tuming of master switch MS to its program operating position efiects connection of contacts P2, P3, P4 and P5 through contact P1 and conductors 106 and 110 to preset pulse conductor 112. Contacts P6 and P7 are bridged to connect line L2 to card reader CR through bridging member Be and conductor 116 to energize the card reader and contacts P8 and P9 are bridged to effect energization of relay 4CR in a circuit extending from line L1 through conductor 118, bridging member Bd, contacts 22CR3 and its operating coil to line L2.

Pressing of manual switch PB2 effects operation of card reader CR to insert card No. 1 therein as shown in FIG. 2A. The card reader reads this card, which is coded 25 rotate, by closing tens contacts T1, T2 and T4, units contacts U4 and rotate contacts R. This efiects energization of units presetting relay 4R in a circuit extending from line L1 through its operating coil and units contacts U4 to line L2. Relay 4R opens contacts 4R1 and closes contacts 4R2 to connect presetting pulse conductor 112 through conductors 110* and 106, contact P1, bridging member Ba and contact P3 of master switch MS, contacts 4R2 and conductor 4RC to units digit counting chain UD. In a similar manner, tens digit contacts T1, T2 and T4 effect energization of the tens digit presetting relays PRS to connect conductor 112 to the tens digit counting chain TD. Closure of rotate contacts R completes an energizing circuit for tripping coil T of relay 200R in a circuit extending from line L1 through limit switches LS18b, L819 and LS20a, contacts R, coil T and contacts 20CR2 to line L2. Relay 20CR is thereby tripped to close contacts 20CR 1 and 20CR3 and to open contacts 20CR2 and 20CR4. Contacts 20CR1 close a point in the energizing circuit of closing coil C of relay 20CR, contacts 20CR2 open the circuit of its tripping coil T, contacts 20CR3 close a point in the energizing circuit of closing coil C of relay 21CR and contacts 20CR4 open a point in the energizing circuit of tripping coil T of relay 21CR. As a result, the batch information is stored in the circuit of relay 21CR where it is held until utilized as hereinafter described.

Application of power to lines L1 and L2 also effects energization of power translating unit PS to energize light source LS. Rectifier bridge RB is energized across lines L1 and L2 and effects charging of capacitor C1 in a circ-uit extending from the positive output terminal of the bridge through contacts 6CR3, capacitor C1 and resistor R1 to the negative output terminal of bridge RB. The operating coil of relay SCR is energized across bridge RB through contacts 12CR1 and capacitor C2 is charged. Relay SCR opens contacts 8CR1 and 8CR2 without effeet at this time. The operating coil of relay 3CR is 10 energized across rectifier bridge RB through contacts 16CR1 and capacitor C3is charged. Relay 3CR opens contacts 3CR1 to prevent energization of table rotate solenoids AV9 or AV10 or table lowering solenoid AV11.

Relay 4CR being energized by master switch MS as hereinbefore described, opens contacts 4CR1 to prevent energization of table rotating air valve solenoids AV9 and AV10 and closes contacts 4CR2 to close a point in the energizing circuit of table lowering air valve sole noid AV11.

The operating coil of relay 6CR energizes in a circuit extending through contacts 9CR1 and limit switch LS10a. As a result, contacts 6CR1 close to shunt switch 11CR without eiiect at this time, contacts 6CR2 complete a maintaining circuit for its operating coil in shunt of contacts 9CR1, contacts 6CR3 open to disconnect the operating coil of relay 18CR from rectifier bridge RB and contacts 6CR4 close to connect capacitor C1 across the operating coil of relay 18CR. Capacitor C1 discharges through the operating coil of relay 18CR to energize the same momentarily. This causes contacts 18CR1 to transmit a negative pulse from the negative source through conductor 114 to switch unit SU. As a result, switch unit SU operates to transmit a positive pulse through conductors 112 and and then through conductors 106 and 108 in parallel to the units and tens counting chains UD and TD to preset the same. This positive pulse is transmitted from conductor 106 through contacts P1 and P3 of master switch portion MSa, contacts 4R2 and conductor 4RC to render the right side of the third dual triode in the units digit counting chain UD conducting. This pulse is also transmitted from conductor 108 through master switch portion MSb, conductor 104 and presetting relay circuit PRS to tens digit counting chain TD to render the right sides of the first, second and third dual triodes conducting. This positive pulse is further transmitted from switch unit SU through conductors 112 and to trigger input unit IU whereby the latter transmits the aforementioned fugitive negative pulse through conductor 100 to advance units digit counting chain UD one count. In this way, the decade counters are preset to the complementary condition 75 so that they will reach their full capacity count when twenty-five pulses are received from photocell PC.

It will be recalled that when relay 18CR was pulsed, switch unit SU was triggered to transmit a presetting pulse through conductor 112 to preset the units and tens counting chains. At the same time, switch unit SU operates to transmit a pulse through conductor 122 to trigger first delay counter IDC and render the same effective to count incoming pulses. These incoming pulses are transmitted from the conveyor-operated toothed wheel 124 through magnetic pickup 126 to the first delay counter continuously whenever the conveyor is running but they are not received until the first delay counter is triggered as aforementioned so that from then on it will register the pulses. The first delay counter may be preset to register the required number of pulses as determined by the time required for one newspaper to travel from the light beam 12 to the intercepting blade 18 shown in FIG. 1. Thus, no matter what the speed of the conveyor, the time that it takes for one newspaper to travel from the light beam to the intercepting blade will always be measured by the first delay counter whereafter the first delay counter will effect tripping of the pincher rolls.

Upon reaching the predetermined count, the first delay counter transmits a pulse to second delay counter 2DC to trigger the latter and enable it to register pulses thereafter transmitted by toothed wheel 124 through magnetic pickup 126. The second delay counter may be preset to register the required number of pulses as determined by the time required for the last newspaper of the batch not intercepted to enter below the intercepting blade and settle on top of the batch being formed on the stacking blades. The first and second delay counters are auto- 1 1 matically resetting upon reaching their preset counts as are the units and tens counters.

Continuing with the description of stacker operation, the stacker then automatically operates through a makeready cycle. Concurrently with transmission or: the triggering pulse to the second delay counter upon reaching its predetermined count, the first delay counter also closes contacts lDCl to effect energization of roll trip relay llCR across lines L1 and L2 Relay lCR closes contacts lCRl to energize trip solenoid TS to trip pincher rolls 16 shown in FIG. 1 by unlocking the latch and permitting the delivery end to rise under the action of the tension springs. Contacts lDCl are timed to open in about .12 seconds deenergizing relay lCR.

Tripping of the pincher rolls, FIG. 1, also causes closure of limit switch LSliia and opening of limit switch LSlfi-b. Limit switch LSlSa efiects operation of card reader CR whereby the latter ejects card No. l and inserts card No. 2 into reading position. Card No. 2 is coded 24 deliver, as shown in FIG. 3. The card reader closes contacts according to the code and energizes units digit presetting relays IR and 4R and tens digit relays according to the tens digit 2. The card reader closes deriver contacts D but the closing coil C of relay ZtiCR is not energized as yet because limit switch LSltSb is open.

The count code from card No. l is now registered in the units and tens counting chains, the batch operating information from card No. l is held in the circuit of relay 21CR and the count code from card No. 2 is held in the presetting relays.

Upon reaching its predetermined count, second delay counter 2DC closes contacts ZDCE to momentarily energize batch drop relay Z-CR across lines L1 and L2 and the second delay counter automatically resets itself. Relay ZCR closes contacts ZCRll to energize air valve solenoid AV 7 whereby the latter opens the air valve to admit compressed air into the cylinder to open the stacking blades 24-. Relay ZCR also closes contacts ZCRZ to energize closing coil C of table rotate relay liiCR through contacts lilCRl and limit switch LS3a. Relay MCR opens contacts lrfi'CRl and lhCR land closes contacts MCRZ and 1iiCR3. Contacts ltlCRl interrupt energization of closing coil C; however, the contacts of latched type relay lliiCR remain in their last mentioned positions. Contacts ILCRZ close a point in the energizing circuit of tripping coil T of relay litiCR, contacts llii'CRS close a point in the energizing circuit of air valve solenoid AV9 and contacts liiCR i open a point in the energizing circuit of air valve solenoid AVlii to prepare for rotation of table 28 in the proper direction.

It will be apparent that contacts ZCRZ also energize stepping coil S of batch counting switch HCR. However, batch counting switch HCR is rendered ineffective by the master switch during programmed operation of the system. If it is desired to prevent the unnecessary stepping of switch HCR during programmed operation, additional contacts may be provided on the master switch MS and connected in series with stepping coil S and resetting coil R whereby to disconnect these coils from the power supply lines.

Opening of the stacking blades causes opening of limit switch LSla and closure of limit switch LSllb, the latter energizing air valve solenoid AVll to lower the intercepting blade. Limit switch LSlla prevents retraction of the intercepting blade until the stacking blades close. When the intercepting blade starts to lower, limit switches LS6!) and L819 open and limit switch LSa closes to energize air valve solenoids AV3 and AV% in parallel. Solenoid AVE resets the pincher rolls to normal latched position and solenoid AV?) recloses the stacking blades. Limit switch 1.86:. also energizes table relay MGR. Contacts loCRl open to interrupt the energizing circuit of table delay relay liCR. Capacitor C3 discharges through the energizing coil of relay ZSCR to maintain energization of the relay and maintain contact SCRI open for a predetermined time interval. When the pincher rolls reset, limit switch LSlfia opens and limit switch LSiiib recloses without effect, however, because limit switch L819 in series therewith is open. When the stacking blades reclose, limit switch LSlb opens to deenergize intercept blade lowering air valve solenoid AV 1 and limit switch LSila recloses to energize air valve solenoid AV5 to retract the intercept blade.

Retraction of the interceot blade 13 causes opening of limit switch LSZtia and closing of limit switches LSZtlb and LS2. Limit switch LSZiib completes an energizing circuit for closing coil C of relay ZFLCR through contacts 21CR1 and ZfiCR Contacts ZICRF. open to interrupt energization of closing coil C, contacts 21CR2 complete a point in the energizing circuit of its tripping coil T and contacts 21CR3 close and contacts 21CR4 open to transfer the batch operating information, namely, rotate, which was obtained from card No. l to the circuit of relay ZZCR where it is stored. Closure of limit switch LS2 causes energizating of air valve solenoid AVA to retract the pincher rolls resetting plunger when solenoid AV3 is deenergized. Air valve solenoid AVZ energizes in parallel with solenoid AV and opens the air valve to admit compressed air into the cylinder whereby to raise the intercept assembly 2i? while its blade is in retracted position.

it will be recalled that the energizing circuit of timing relay 3C1; was interrupted. When relay SCR times out, contacts SCRll close to effect energization of air valve solenoid AVlill through conductor 113, contacts 4CR2 and limit switch LSl iia. This causes table 28 to lower whereby the wheels of conveyor 34 extend through the bottom of the table and carry away any newspapers that may be stacked thereon.

When the table lowers, limit switch LSltia opens and limit switch LSltlb closes. Limit switch LSltib effects energization of table position relay IZCR across lines L1 and L2. Contacts 12CR1 interrupt energizetion of timing relay SCR to close contacts 8CR1 and SCRZ when capacitor C2 has discharged and the relay times out. Contacts 12CR2 close a point in the circuit of ready relay 9CR. When relay SCR times out, contacts SCRZ close a point in the circuit of table raising air valve solenoid AVllZ and contacts 8CR1 complete the energizing circuit of relay 9CR through contacts llZCRZ. Contacts 9CR1 open to interrupt the original energizing circuit of relay son, the latter, however, be ing self-maintained. Contacts 9CR2 close to establish a self-maintaining circuit for the operating coil of relay 9CR in shunt of contacts 8CR1 and llZCRZ. Contacts 9CR3 complete the energizing circuit of solenoid AV12 to raise the table. If desired, relay 9CR may have an indicator connected across its operating coil to indicate the ready condition. When the table was lowered, opening of limit switch LSltla caused deenergization of clearing relay 6CR and opening of contacts 6CR1, 6CR2 and 6CR4 and closing of contacts 6CR3, the latter causing recharging of capacitor C1. When the table is raised, limit switch LSltia recloses and limit switch LSlltlb opens to deenergize relay IZCR. Contacts 12CR1 reenergize relay SCR. Contacts 8CR2 interrupt energization of table raising solenoid AVllZ. Relay 9CR is maintained through contacts 9CR2.

When the intercept blade is fully raised, limit switch LSoa opens and limit switches LSob and LS3 reclose. Limit switch LSfia deenergizes solenoid AV3 whereby to close the air valve. As a result, air valve solenoid AV4 which was previously energized is permitted to retract the pincher rolls resetting plunger. Limit switch LS6a also deenergizes air valve solenoids AVS and AV8 and relay rscn. Contacts 16CR1 effect reenergization of relay SCR to open contacts 3CR1 and thereby disconnect the table operating circuit. Limit switch LStib effects energization of air valve solenoid AV6 to advance intercept blade 18 to its extended position. The move ment of the intercept blade causes limit switches LS2 and LSZtlb to open and limit switch LS20a to close. Limit switch LS2 deenergizes air valve solenoids AVZ and AV4. Limit switch LSZtlb interrupts the circuit of relay 21CR and limit switch LS20a completes an energizing circuit for closing coil C of relay 22CR through limit switches LS18b and L819 and contacts 2lCR3 and 22CR1. This causes opening of contacts ZZCRI to interrupt energizetion of closing coil C, closing of contacts 22CR2 to close a point in circuit with tripping coil T, and opening of contacts 22CR3 to transfer the batch operating information which was obtained from card No. 1 to the circuit of relay 4CR. This transfer is effected by causing deenergization of relay 4CR to close contacts 4CR1 and open contacts 4CR2. Contacts 4CR2 disconnect the table lowering solenoid AVll and contacts 4CR1 close a point in the circuits of table rotating solenoids AV9 and AV10.

Limit switch LSZtla also efiects energization of closing coil C of relay 20CR through'limit switches LS18b and L819, contacts ZtlCRl and deliver contacts D, the latter having been closed by card No. 2. Contacts 20CR3 open and contacts 20CR4 close to transfer the batch operating information from card No. 2 to the circuit of relay 21CR where it is stored. Contacts 2tlCR2 close a point in the circuit of tripping coil T and contacts ZOCRI interrupt energization of closing coil C.

The make ready period is now over. The count code from card No. 1 is registered in the units and tens counting chains and the batch operating information from card No. l calling for rotation of the first batch is stored in the circuit of relay 4CR. The count code from card No. 2 is registered in the units and tens presetting relays and the batch operating information from card No. 2

calling for delivery of the first bundle is stored in the circuit of relay 2llCR.

Newspapers may now be conveyed into the stacker. Each newspaper interrupts light beam 12 to operate input unit 1U whereby the latter transmits negative pulses to the units digit counting chain through conductor 100.

The units digit counting chain has been preset at 5 so that when the first 5 pulses are received, it counts out and transmits a negative pulse through conductor 102 to the tens digit counting chain TD to advance the latter one count. The units digit counting chain automatically resets itself to zero. The next ten pulses from input unit IU cause the units digit counting chain to count out again, advance the tens digit counting chain a second count and reset itself to zero. The twenty-fifth pulse causes the units digit counting chain to count out a third time and advance the tens digit counting chain a third count. The latter having been preset at 7, it counts out in response to the third advance and transmits a pulse to operate switch unit SU and automatically resets itself. As a result, switch unit SU transmits a presetting pulse as hereinbefore described through conductors 112 and 110 and then through conductors 196 and 108 to preset the units and tens counting chains in accordance with the binary codes from card No. 2 which were stored on the presetting relays.

Switch unit SU also transmits a pulse through conductor 122 to trigger first delay counter 113C to render the latter responsive to pulses from'magnetic pickup 12d. The first delay count-er counts out at the instant when the twentyfifth newspaper has entered below intercept blade 18 and trips the pincher rolls as hereinbefore described whereby the following newspapers flow onto the intercept blade. The first delay counter also triggers the second delay counter 2DC to receive pulses from magnetic pickup 126. The second delay counter counts out at the instant when the twenty-fifth newspaper has settled on top of the batch being formed on the stacking blades. The interception of the stream also causes the card reader CR to eject card No. 2 and to insert card No. 3, read the latter and energize the presetting relays in accordance with the codes thereon.

The stacker control in FIGS. 2A and 25 then operates as aforedescribed to drop the first batch onto table 2-8. The stacking blades are opened and in response thereto limit switch LSlb causes lowering of the intercept blade. Limit switch LS6a effects. timing of relay 3CR. The table is alternately rotatable degrees in opposite directions. Assuming that table 28 is rotated to its extrerne position in one direction, limit switch LS3a is closed and limit switch L831) is open as shown. When the table is rotated in the other direction, limit switch LS3a opens and limit switch L531) closes. These limit switches control table rotate latched relay 10CR which in turn selects the proper directional solenoid AV9 or AVlti.

vVhen table delay timing relay 3CR times out in response to lowering of intercept blade 18, contacts 3CR1 close to complete an energizing circuit for table rotating air valve solenoid AV9 through contacts ltlCRS and 4CR1 and limit switch LSltla. As a result, the first batch is rotated 180 degrees. Such lowering of the intercept blade causes resetting of the pincher rolls and reclosing of the stacking blades in response to limit switch LS6a. Reclosure of the stacking blades causes retracting of the intercept blade at limit switch Lslla. As a result, limit switch LSZtlb closes. to transfer the batch operating information derived from card No. 2 from the circuit of relay 210R to the circuit of relay ZZCR.

When the intercept blade was retracted to transfer the second batch onto the stacking blades, limit switch LSZtlb transferred the batch operating information derived from card No. 2 from the circuit of relay 21CR to the circuit of relay ZZCR. This transfer is eifected by energization of tripping coil T of relay 21CR to close contacts 21CR4 thereby to prepare for energization of tripping coil T of relay ZZCR. When limit switch LSZtla recloses in response to advancing of the intercept blade, the batch operating information derived from card No. 2 is transferred to the circuit of relay 4CR. This transfer is effected by energization of tripping coil T of relay ZZCR to close contacts 22CR3 and energize relay 4CR. Limit switch LSZtla also transfers the batch operating information derived from card No. 3 to the circuit of relay 21CR. This information is the same as on card No. 2, namely, deliver, so that relay ZtlCR remains in its closed condition as shown. The closed condition of contacts 2tlCR4 constitute a storage of this information. It will be apparent that the energized condition of relay 4CR wherein contacts 4CR2 are closed is indicative of deliver and the unenergized condition of relay 4CR wherein contacts iCRl are closed is indicative of rotate, these contacts being in the delivery and rotate solenoid circuits, respectively.

When the counting chains count out in response to the twenty-fourth newspaper of the second batch, the pre setting pulse transfers the count code derived from card No. 3 to the counting chains. First delay counter lDC operates to cause tripping of the pincher rolls to intercept the stream. This effects closure of limit switch LS18a to operate the card reader to eject card No. 3 and insert card No. 4, to read the latter and energize the presetting relays in accordance with the count code thereon.

At this time the first batch of 25 newspapers is on the table in rotated position, the second batch of 24 newspapers is on the stacking blades and the third batch is feeding onto the intercept blade. The second delay counter operates the stacking blades to drop the second batch onto the first batch to form a balanced bundle. The intercept blade is lowered in response to dropping of the second batch, the pincher rolls are reset, the stacking blades are closed, the intercept blade is retracted and raised, the pincher rolls resetting plunger is retracted and the intercept blade is advanced as aforedescribed.

When the intercept blade was retracted to transfer the third batch onto the stacking blades, limit switch LSZtlb transferred the batch operating information derived from card No. 3 from the circuit of relay 21CR to the circuit of relay 22CR. When limit switch LSZtla recloses in response to advancing of the intercept blade, the batch operating information derived from card No. 3, namely, deliver, is transferred to the circuit of relay 4CR to energize the latter. Limit switch LSZtla also transfers the batch operating information derived from card No. 4 to the circuit of relay ZllCR.

In the meantime, lowering of the intercept blade has caused relay 3CR to time. When relay SCR times out, contacts 3CR 1 complete an energizing circuit for table lowering air valve solenoid AVH as hereinbefore described. The table lowers and conveyor 34 moves the bundle to the delivery table. When the bundle reaches the delivery table, it closes limit switch LSW) to energize table raising air valve solenoid AVZZ. Solenoid AVlZ is energized by relay 3CR only during the make ready cycle. Limit switch LSlilb closes in response to lowering of the table to energize relay lZCR. Contacts IZCRZ close without etfect as relay 3CR is maintained energized. Contacts IZCRl disconnect timing relay 3CR and the latter starts to time out. However, the bundle closes limit switch LS9!) to energize solenoid AV12 and raise the table before relay 80R times out. Should the bundle fail to close limit switch LS9b, relay SCR times out after a time interval sufficient to afford removal of the bundle from the table. Contacts riCR complete an energizing circuit for table raising solenoid AV12 through contacts 9CR3 to raise the table. It will be apparent that relay SCR is required to operate solenoid AV12 during the make ready cycle when a bundle is not delivered and also provides a safety device to insure operation of solenoid AVlZ in the event the bundle fails to close limit switch LS9b.

At this stage the first bundle of 49 newspapers comprising a rotated first batch of papers and a second batch of 24 papers is on the delivery table and the third batch is being formed on the stacking blades. The count code from card No. 3 is registered on the units and tens counting chains, and the count code from card No. 4 is stored on the presetting relays. The batch operating information from card No. 3 is stored in the circuit of relay 4CR energizing the latter and the batch operating information derived from card No. 4 is stored in the circuit of relay ZllCR.

When the counting chains count out in response to the twenty-seventh paper of the third batch, the presetting pulse transfers the count code derived from card No. 4 to the counting chains. First delay counter llDC operates to cause tripping of the pincher rolls to intercept the stream. As a result, limit switch LSl8a causes the card reader to eject card No. 4 and insert card No. 5. The second delay counter operates the stacking blades to drop the third batch on the stacker table and the intercept blade is lowered. This operates limit switch LS6a to start relay SCR timing. Then the stacker operates as before to reset the pincher rolls. Lowering of the intercept blade causes opening of limit switch L819 to maintain this circuit open after limit switch L518]; closes in response to resting of the pincher rolls. Thus, transfer of batch information from card No. 5 is delayed and placed under the control of limit switch LS20a to be performed only after the batch information derived from card No. 4 has been advanced from the circuit of relay 21CR. Lowering of the intercept blade also causes closure of the stacking blades and resetting of the pincher rolls. Limit switch LSZQI) responds to transfer the batch operating information of card No. 4 from the circuit of relay 21CR to the circuit of relay ZZCR. Lowering of the intercept blade causes relay 3CR to time and when it times out, contacts 3CR1 effect energization of air valve AVll to lower the table and convey the third batch of 27 papers therefrom. Lowering of the intercept blade also causes the stacking blades to close. The stacker then operates to raise the intercept blade. This causes the batch operating information from card No. 4, namely, rotate, to be transferred to the circuit of relay 4CR and the batch operating information from card No. 5 to be transferred to the circuit of relay 21CR and the operation continues further in accordance with the coded cards.

Normal operation For normal operation of the system, master switch MS is turned to its normal operating position. This causes disconnection of the contacts of units presetting relays 1R, 2R, 4R and SR and the contacts of the tens presetting relays and connection of presetting pulse conductor 112 to the movable arms of presetting switches 18, 2S, 4S and 8S and to the movable arms of the tens presetting switches PRS. Also, contacts P6 and P7 of the master switch are opened to disconnect card reader CR and contacts N6 and N7 are bridged to place batch information relay 4CR under the control of batch counting stepping switch 11CR. In addition, contacts P8 and P9 are opened to render relay 22CR ineffective to control operation of relay 4CR.

'In effect, then, the punched cards have been removed from controlling the stacker and it becomes necessary to manually set units presetting switches IS, 23, 4S and 8S and the tens presetting switches to determine the number of newspapers per batch which number remains the same for each batch unless the setting of these switches is changed. Stepping switch lllCR is preset to determine the number of batches per bundle and this number also remains the same unless the setting of this switch is changed.

Let it be assumed that lines L1 and L2 are energized, the presetting switches are set for 25 newspapers and presetting arm llCRl of switch 11CR is set on contact No. 2 to call for two batches of 25 papers each in a bundle.

Rectifier bridge RB is energized across lines L1 and L2 and causes charging of capacitor C1 and energization of relays SCR and 3CR. Relay 8CR opens contacts SCRI and 8CR2 without immediate effect. Relay 30R opens contacts 3CR1 to prevent table operation. Solenoid AV6 energizes to maintain the intercept blade advanced.

It will be apparent from FIG. 2A that units digit presetting switches IS, 28, 4S and have their stationary contacts connected to the double triodes of units digit counting chain UD in such a manner as to perform a translation of the preset units digit into a binary complementary-to-nine number. The tens digit presetting switches perform a similar translation. The aforementioned presetting of these switches calling for the counting of 25 newspapers is accomplished by turning the units digit presetting switches to position No. 5 and the tens digit presetting switches to position No. 2. For the units digit 5, this will connect presetting pulse conductor 112 to conductors lLC, ZLC, 4RC and 8LC. Thereafter when the presetting pulse is applied, the third double triode will be turned on, that is, the right-hand side of the third double triode will be rendered conducting and left-hand sides of the first, second and fourth double triodes will be rendered conducting. It will be apparent from the aforementioned translation table that this constitutes a registration of the complementary-to-nine binary number, or 4. Turning the tens digit presetting switches to operating position No. 2 will cause the presetting pulse to register the number 7. Thus, the counting chains are set at 74 and the fugitive pulse will advance the units digit counting chain one count to afford a registration of 75. In this manner the counting chains will reach their full capacity count when twenty-five pulses are received from the photoelectric device and initiate operation of the delay counters and the stacker.

Continuing with the stacker operation, clearing relay 6CR is energized through contacts 9CR1 and limit switch LSllila. Should ready relay 9CR be maintained energized at this time due to previous operation of the stacker control, clearing relay 60R may be energized manually by momentarily pressing pushbut'ton switch PB3. Contacts 6CR'1 complete an energizing circuit for relay 4CR through bridging member Be and contacts N6 and N7 of the master switch. Contacts 6CR2 complete a maintaining circuit for itself in shunt of contacts 9CR1 and switch PR3, contacts 6CR3 open and contacts 6CR4 close to pulse relay 180R by discharging capacitor C1 through its operating coil. Relay 18CR closes contacts 18CR1 momentarily to transmit a pulse to switch unit SU whereby to preset the counting chains to receive 25 pulses and to trigger first delay counter -lDC. The latter counts out in response to conveyor pulses and operates relay lCR to operate trip solenoid TS and trip the pincher rolls and also triggers second delay counter 2DC. The latter counts out in response to the conveyor pulses from pickup 126 and energizes relay ZCR. Contacts 2CR1 close to energize solenoid AV7 to open the stacking blades and contacts QCRZ close to energize closing coil C or tripping coil T of relay 10CR depending on the position of contacts 10CR1 and 10CR2 and limit switches LS3a and LS3b. It will be apparent that each time contacts ZCRZ are closed, the contacts of relay 10CR shift from one condition to the other condition so as to alternately energize table rotating solenoids AV9 and AV10. Conjointly therewith, table rotation shifts limit switches LS3a and LS3b from one condition to the other so that each 180 degree table rotation is in the reverse direction from the last rotation.

Opening of the stacking blades causes opening of limit switch LSla to prevent energization of intercept blade retracting solenoid AV5 and causes closing of limit switch LSlb to energize solenoid AV1 and lower the intercept blade. As a result, limit switch LS6b opens and limit switch LS6a closes to energize solenoid AV3 to reset the pincher rolls. Limit switch LS6a also energizes solenoid AV8 to reclose the stacking blades, and energizes relay 160R to open contacts 16CR1 and start the timing of relay 3CR. Reclosure of the stacking blades causes closing of limit switch LSla to energize solenoid AV5 and retract the intercept blade. Retraction of the intercept blade closes limit switch LS2 to energize solenoids AV2 and AV4. Solenoid AV2 raises the intercept blade and solenoid AV4 retracts the pincher rolls resetting plunger.

When relay 3CR times out, contacts 3CR1 complete the energizing circuit of solenoid AV11 to lower table 28 whereby any newspapers thereon are carried away. When the intercept blade is raised, limit switch LS6a opens to deenergize relay 16CR and energize relay 3CR and limit switch LS6b closes to energize solenoid AV6 and ad- Vance the intercept blade. Limit switch LS2 opens.

Lowering of table 28 closes limit switch LSb to energize relay 12CR which opens contacts 1'2CR1 to start relay 8CR timing and closes contacts 12CR2. Limit switch LSltla opens to deenergize relay 6CR. When relay 8CR times out, contacts SCRI close to energize relay 9CR and contacts 8CR2 close. Relay 9CR opens contacts 9CR1 to open a point in the circuit of relay 60R and prevent further operation thereof, closes contacts 9CR2 to maintain its own operating coil, and closes contacts 9CR3 to energize solenoid AV'IZ and raise the table. Deenergization of relay 6CR opens contacts 6CR1 to deenergize relay 4CR and render batch counting switch llCR effective thereafter by removing the shunt. Contacts 6CR2 interrupt the maintaining circuit of its operating coil to maintain relay 6CR deenergized from then on as contacts 9CR1 are open. Contacts 6CR3 close and contacts 6CR4 open to charge capacitor C1. Raising of table 28 causes opening of limit switch LS10b to deenergize relay 12CR which at contacts 12CR1 energizes relay 8CR. Contacts 12CR1 and 8CR1 interrupt the original energizing circuit of relay 9CR which, however, is self-maintained and contacts SCRZ effect deenergization of table raising solenoid AV1 2.

The make ready period is now over, the stacker has been cleared of papers and is ready to receive a stream of newspapers. v H I The newspapers are fed onto stacking blades 24 and are counted by light beam 12 which transmits pulses into the units digit counting chain through input IU and conductor 100. When the units and tens counting chains count out in response to the twenty-fifth paper, switch unit SU is operated and the counting chains reset themselves to zero. Switch unit SU triggers first delay counter 1DC to receive pulses from pickup 26 and transmits a presetting pulse through conductors 112 and and then through conductors 106 and 10 8 in parallel to preset the units and tens counting chains, and triggers input unit IU to transmit the fugitive pulse to advance units counting chain UD one count thereby to preset the counting chains for receipt of 25 pulses. When the first delay counter c'ounts out, relay 1CR is energized to operate solenoid TS and trip the pincher rolls and the second delay counter is triggered. As a result, the stream intercepted and when the second delay counter counts out at the time the twenty-fifth paper settles on top of the batch being collected on the stacking blades, relay ZCR is energized. Contacts 2CR1 energize solenoid AV7 to open the stacking blades and drop the first batch on table 28. Contacts 2CR2 energize stepping coil S to step switch 110K to contact No. 1 thereby to count the first batch. I

Opening of the stacking blades closes limit switch LSl b to energize solenoid AV1 and lower the intercept blade as it receives newspapers from the stream. The stacker control then operates as hereinbefore described to reset the pincher rolls, close the stacking blades and initiate timing of relay 3CR. The intercept blade is then withdrawn to deposit the second batch which is being formed onto the stacking blades. This causes withdrawal of the pincher rolls resetting plunger and raising of the intercept blade in retracted position. 7

When relay 3CR times out and contacts 3CR1 close, solenoid AV9 or AV10 is energized to rotate the table degrees depending upon the position of relay 10CR. When the intercept blade reaches its uppermost position, limit switch LS6a opens to reenergize relay 3CR when contacts 16CR1 close and limit switch L865 closes to energize solenoid AV6 and advance the intercept blade. This opens limit switch LS2 to deenergize solenoids AV2 and AV4. i

The first batch is now on the table which has been rotated and the second batch is feeding onto the stacking blades. When the twenty-fifth paper of the second batch causes the counting chains to count out and trip the pincher rolls to intercept the stream, the second delay counter energizes relay ZCR which closes contacts 2CR1 and 2CR2. Contacts 2CR1 energize solenoid AV7 to drop the second batch onto the first batch and contacts ZCRZ energize stepping coil S to step switch 11CR to operating position No. 2. As a result, relay 4CR is energized in a circuit extending through switch 11CR and bridging member Bc of the master switch. Relay 4CR opens contacts 4CR1 to prevent rotation of the table and closes contacts 4CRZ to prepare for delivery of the bundle. The stacker control then operates the stacker as hereinbefore described and when relay 3CR times out, contacts 3CR1 efiect energization of solenoid AV11 to lower the table whereby the bundle is transported by conveyor 34 onto the delivery table. There the bundle closes switch LS9a to energize coil R to reset stepping switch 11CR to its normal position and closes limit switch LS9b to energize solenoid AVlZ and raise the table. The stacker then operates in the same manner through a rotate cycle when relay 4CR is not energized and through a delivery cycle when relay flCR is energized by stepping switch 11CR on the second batch of each bundle to deliver two-batch bundles of a total of fifty papers to the delivery table.

It will be apparent that the units and tens presetting switches may be set for any number of papers from 1 to 100 per batch, the minimum number of papers per batch being limited only by the operating time of the stacker relative to the speed of the stream. And stepping switch 11CR may be set for any desired number of batches per bundle, this being limited by the capacity of the stacker table.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as employing information-coded punched cards, it will be apparent that magnetically-coded tape, wire, drum or other equivalent means could as well be employed in place thereof for introducing stacking information into the system.

I claim:

1. In a control system for stacker for stacking into batches predetermined numbers of units of flexible material flowing in a lapped stream and for reversely stacking into bundles predetermined numbers of such batches and for delivering such bundles, program control means for said stacker comprising means carrying coded information indicative of the number of units to be stacked in each successive batch and the number of batches to be stacked in each bundle, information storage means, manual means for initiating operation of said storage means, means responsive to operation of said storage means for introducing therein from said carrying means information concerning a plurality of successive batches and for operating said stacker through a make ready cycle thereby to prepare said stacker for the receipt of units from said stream, means responsive to the units in said stream flowing into said stacker for operating the latter to form batches and bundles in accordance with the stored information and to deliver said bundles, and means responsive to the formation of each'batch for operating said storage means in sequence with said stacker to store information concerning an additional batch thereby to maintain said storage means in readiness to control said stacker as the units for each succeeding batch flow therein.

2. In a system for stacking predetermined numbers of newspapers flowing in a lapped stream, in combination, a support for receiving newspapers from the stream, an intercepting blade for intercepting the stream when a predetermined number of newspapers have been deposited to form a batch on said support, a bundle forming table rotatable 180 degrees in reverse directions, means for lowering said table. a conveyor for conveying the newspapers from said table when the latter is lowered, control means for controlling the number of newspapers in each batch and the number of batches in each bundle, said control means comprising a counter adjacent the discharge end of said stream for counting the number of newspapers flowing onto said support, means responsive to said counter for intercepting said stream and for operating said support to drop the batch onto said table when a predetermined number of newspapers have been deposited on said support, presettable means for storing information indicative of the number of newspapers per batch and the number of batches per bundle, means responsive to operation of said support for rotating said table each time said presettable means is set to indicate more than one batch per bundle, means responsive to operation of said support for lowering said table each time said presettable means is set to indicate one batch per bundle, and means for automatically varying the number of newspapers in each successive batch and the number of batches in each successive bundle.

3. The invention defined in claim 2, wherein the last mentioned means comprises coded means bearing information indicative of the number of newspapers for each successive batch and information indicating whether to rotate or lower said table following deposit thereon of the corresponding batch, and means operating in sequence with said control means for controlling said coded means to store the information therefrom in said presettable means.

4. In a stacker system for stacking predetermined numbers of flexible units flowing in and being discharged from a lapped stream, in combination, stacking blades for receiving units from the stream, an intercepting blade for intercepting the stream when a predetermined number of units have been deposited to form a batch on said stacking blades, a bundle-forming table rotatable degrees in reverse directions, means for lowering the table, a conveyor for delivering the units from the table when the latter is lowered, control means for controlling the number of units in each batch and the number of batches in each bundle, means carrying groups of coded information, each successive group corresponding to a batch of units to be formed and including information indicating the number of units for the corresponding batch and information indicating whether to rotate the table or to deliver the batch following deposit on the table of the corresponding batch, means for storing said information for control of the stacking system, and

means for operating said system through a make-ready cycle to store said information relative to the first batch before said units are discharged onto said stacking blades and for operating said stacker to deliver any units that may remain on said stacking blades and said intercepting blade and said table thereby to clear the units therefrom.

5. In a control system for a newspaper stacker, said stacker having stacking blades for receiving newspapers flowing in a lapped stream, a counter for counting the newspapers as they approach the stacker and for transmitting a pulse for each count, an intercepting blade operable by said counter for intercepting the stream, and a rotatable table for receiving batches of newspapers, said stacking blades being operable following interception of the stream for dropping each batch on said table, in combination, a selector switch manually operable to preset said stacker for programmed operation under the control of coded cards, a card reader energizable in response to operation of said stacker for inserting cards therein after the first card, manual control means for causing a first coded card to be inserted in said reader, said card carrying coded information indicative of the number of newspapers to be stacked in a batch and batch information indicative of whether the first batch is to be rotated or delivered, storage means, said card reader being responsive to insertion of the card therein for storing said information in said storage means, static counting means, means to preset said counting means in accordance with the setting of said storage means thereby to prepare said counting means to count a number of pulses from said counter in accordance with said coded information, control means for said stacker, means in said counting means responsive to completion of the count for operating said control means to control said stacker to intercept the stream and to drop the batch on said table, and means responsive to dropping of said batch for operating said table in accordance with said stored batch information.

'6. In a control system for a stacker for stacking units of flexible material being discharged from a lapped stream into batches and for stacking such batches in alternately rotated reversed relation into bundles and for delivering such bundles, the improvement compris- 1ng program control means for the stacker including means carrying groups of coded information in selected order, each group corresponding to a batch of units to be formed and comprising unit information for controlling the number of units to be stacked in the correspondlng batch and batch information for controlling delivery or rotation of the corresponding batch as desired, first information storage means, second information storage means, a reader, means for feeding said information carrylng means into said reader, means responsive to said reader for presetting said first storage means to control the number of units per batch and for presetting said second storage means in accordance with said batch information, control means responsive to discharge of said units from said stream into said stacker for forming a batch in accordance with the setting of said first storage means and for rotating or delivering said batch in accordance with the setting of said second storage means, and means responsive to utilization of the stored information corresponding to each batch for presetting said first and second storage means in accordance with a succeeding group of coded information.

7. In a stacking system, a stacking device comprising a support, means for receiving units of flexible material flowing thereto in a lapped stream and for successively stacking series of said units directly from said lapped stream onto said support to form batches of units, a rotatable table, means for controlling said support to transfer each successive batch from said support onto said rotatable table, and means for controlling the number of said units to be stacked in each such batch comprising means for storing information indicative of the number of such units to be stacked in each batch which number is variable for the successive batches in accordance with a selected program, and control means operating in sequence with said stacking device and being responsive to said information storing means for automatically varying the number of such units stacked in the successive batches thereby to deliver successive batches from said stacking device having ditferent numbers of said units in accordance with said selected program.

-8. In a system for stacking predetermined numbers of units of flexible material flowing in a lapped stream, in combination, a support, means for stacking a predetermined number of such units on said support and for transferring the units as a batch from said support to a rotatable table when said predetermined number of units has been stacked, and control means operating in sequence with said stacking means for automatically varying said predetermined number to deliver successive stacks from said table having desired numbers of units in accordance with a predetermined program, said control means comprising means for storing information indicative of the number of such units to be stacked in each batch, means for operating said storing means to introduce such information therein, and means responsive to the last unit of a batch being formed for operating said storing means to control said stacking means in accordance with such information.

9. In a system for stacking predetermined numbers of units of flexible material flowing in a lapped stream, in combination, a support, means for stacking a predetermined number of such units on said support and for transferring the units as a batch from said support to a rotatable table when said predetermined number of units has been stacked, and control means operating in sequence with said stacking means for automatically varymg said predetermined number to deliver successive stacks from said table having desired numbers of units in accordance with a predetermined program, said control means comprising information storing means, means for nitially introducing into said storing means information ndicative of the number of units to be stacked in a pluralrty of successive batches, and means responsive to said stacking means utilizing the stored information concernng a given batch for advancing the stored information in said storing means and for introducing therein informatron concerning an additional batch.

10. In a system for stacking predetermined numbers of units of flexible material flowing in a lapped stream, in combination, a support, means for stacking a predetermined number of such units on said support and for transferring the units as a batch from said support to a rotatable table when said predetermined number of units has been stacked, and control means operating in sequence with said stacking means for automatically varying said predetermined number to deliver successive stacks from said table having desired numbers of units in acoord ance with a predetermined program, said control means comprising means for storing information indicative of the number of such units to be stacked, means for op erating said storing means to initially introduce such information therein indicative of the number of such units to be stacked in the first and second batch to be formed, means for thereafter introducing such units into said stacking means, and means responsive to the last unit of said first batch being formed for operating said storing means to control said stacking means to utilize the stored information concerning the first batch and to advance in said storing means the information concernig the second batch and to introduce in said storing means information concerning the third batch.

11. In a stacking system for stacking predetermined numbers of units of flexible material flowing in a lapped stream, in combination, a support, a rotatable table, means for successively stacking predetermined numbers of such units received from said lapped stream onto said support to form batches of such units and for transferring each batch of units from said support to a rotatable table each time a batch having a predetermined number of units has been formed, means for storing information indicative of the numbers of units to be stacked in suc cessive batches and the numbers of batches to be stacked in successive bundles in accordance with a predetermined program, control means operating in sequence with said stacking means and being responsive to said information storing means for automatically varying said predetermined number to provide successive batches having desired numbers of units in accordance with the information on said information storing means, and means for controlling delivery of the batches from said table comprising means to vary automatically the number of batches accumulated in bundles on said table between deliveries in accordance with the information on said information storing means.

12 In a stacking system for stacking predetermined numbers of units of flexible material flowing in a lapped stream, in combination, a support, means for successively stacking predetermined numbers of such units on said support and for transferring each batch of units from said support to a rotatable table each time a batch having a predetermined number of units has been formed, control means operating in sequence with said stacking means for automatically varying said predetermined number to provide successive batches having desired numbers of units in accordance with a predetermined program, means for controlling delivery of the batches from said table comprising means to vary automatically the number of batches accumulated in bundles on said table between deliveries in accordance with a predetermined program, manual selector means for transferring said control means from program control to normal control, means for preselecting the number of units for each batch, means for preselecting the number of batches for each bundle, and means responsive to said units flowing into said stacking means for controlling the latter to deliver uniform bundles of units in accordance with said preselections.

13. In stacker system for stacking units of folded flexible material flowing in and being discharged from a lapped stream and having a table for receiving batches of said units, said table being rotatable degrees in reverse direction to form plural-batch balanced bundles with the folded edges in alternate batches reversed and being lowerable to render a conveyor effective to deliver each bundle from the table, the improvement comprising control means operating in sequence with the stacker for controlling the number of units per batch and the number of batches per bundle, said control means comprising first manual means for selecting normal or program operation for said control means, second manual means operable when normal operation is selected for selecting the number of units per batch and the number of batches per bundle which numbers remain constant until said second manual means is reset, means for storing coded information indicative of the numbers of units to be stacked in successive batches and the numbers of batches to be stacked in successive bundles, and mean operable when program operation is selected and comprising means responsive to said information storing means for automatically varying the number of units in the batches and the number of batches in the bundles in accordance with said coded information.

14. In a stacker system for stacking units of folded flexible material flowingin and being discharged from a lapped stream and having a table for receiving batches of said units, said table being rotatable 180 degrees in reverse directions to form plural-batch balanced bundles with the folded edges in alternate batches reversed and being lowerable to render a conveyor effective to deliver the bundle from the table, the improvement comprising control means operating in sequence with the stacker for controlling the number of units per batch and the number of batches per bundle, first manual means for selecting normal or program operation for the stacker, second manual means operable when normal operation is selected for selecting the number of units per batch and the number of batches per bundle which numbers remain constant until said second manual means is reset, and means operable when program operation is selected for automatically varying the number of units in each successive batch and the number of batches in each successive bundle in accordance with coded information fed into the system, the last mentioned means comprising means carrying groups of coded information, each successive group corresponding to a batch of units to be formed and including information indicating the number of units for the corresponding batchand information indicating whether to rotate the table or to deliver by lowering the table following deposit thereon of the corresponding batch, means operating in coordination with said control means for moving said carrying means to feed said groups of coded information into the system, means for reading and storing said groups of coded information in succession, and means responsive to said storing means for operating said control means o control formation of batches and bundles and to T24 deliver the latter in accordance with said coded information.

15'. In a stacker system for stacking units of folded flexible material flowing in and being discharged from a lapped stream and having a table for receiving batches of said units, said table being rotatable degrees in reverse directions to form plural-batch balanced bundles With the folded edges in alternate batches reversed and being lowerable to render a conveyor effective to deliver the bundle from the table, the improvement comprising control means operating in sequence with the stacker for controlling the number of units per batch and the number of batches per bundle, first manual means for selecting normal or program operation for the stacker, second manual means operable when normal operation is selected for selecting the number of units per batch and the number of batches per bundle which numbers remain constant until said second manual means is reset, and means operable when program operation is selected for automatically varying the number of units to each successive batch and the number of batches in each successive bundle in accordance with coded information fed into the system, the last mentioned means comprising a plurality of punched cards, one for each batch of units to be formed, each card having punched thereon coded information indicating the number of units to be stacked in the corresponding batch and information indicating whether to deliver the batch from the table or to rotate the table preparatory to deposit of another batch thereon, a card reader, means operating in coordination with said control means for inserting said cards successively in said reader, means responsive to said reader for successively storing the information derived from each card, and means [for utilizing said stored information in the proper sequence of stacker operation to operate said control means thereby to control formation of batches and bundles and to deliver the same in accordance with said coded information.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,122,710 Bidwell et al. July 5, 1938 2,133,262 Wolff Oct. 11, 1938 2,629,300 Smith Feb. 24, 1953 2,819,661 Howdle et al. Jan. 14, 1958 2,820,187 Parsons et al. Jan. 14, 1958 2,833,941 Rusenberg et a1. Mar. 6, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2122710 *Jun 24, 1933Jul 5, 1938Bidwell Paul WCounting device
US2133262 *Sep 27, 1937Oct 11, 1938Paul S BauerMachine for separating, counting, and delivering sheet material
US2629300 *Feb 16, 1949Feb 24, 1953Reynolds & Reynolds CompanySheet counting and tab inserting device
US2819661 *Jun 10, 1953Jan 14, 1958Cutler Hammer IncMachine for and method of counting and stacking newspapers and the like
US2820187 *May 5, 1952Jan 14, 1958Parsons CorpMotor controlled apparatus for positioning machine tool
US2833941 *Nov 2, 1955May 6, 1958Gen Dynamics CorpAutomation system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3197200 *Jan 21, 1963Jul 27, 1965Thrissell Engineering CompanySheet stacking apparatus
US3229599 *Nov 12, 1964Jan 18, 1966Lowe Richard GMass sheet inscribing, counting, collating, and stacking machine means and process
US3270630 *Aug 21, 1963Sep 6, 1966Bostitch IncMaterial handling apparatus
US3364827 *Nov 19, 1965Jan 23, 1968Cutler Hammer IncProgramming console for counter stacker
US3429240 *Sep 25, 1967Feb 25, 1969Chubu Nippon Shinbunsha KkApparatus for automatically processing sections from rotary press
US3578181 *Mar 24, 1969May 11, 1971Cluett Peabody & Co IncParts stacker
US3998339 *Aug 15, 1975Dec 21, 1976Sam Stein Associates, Inc.Patty stacker
US4140234 *Feb 14, 1977Feb 20, 1979Rima EnterprisesTurning mechanism
US4183704 *Apr 17, 1978Jan 15, 1980Rima EnterprisesCompensating stacker for printed signatures
US4354787 *Sep 2, 1980Oct 19, 1982Photomatrix Corp.Microfiche collating stacker
US5039083 *Jan 5, 1990Aug 13, 1991John Brown Development, Inc.Sheet control apparatus and method for sheet stacker
US6149149 *Aug 3, 1998Nov 21, 2000Gammerler AgCross stacker
US6746202 *Aug 13, 2001Jun 8, 2004Ferag AgMethod and arrangement for the production of crossed stacks
US8356967Mar 15, 2010Jan 22, 2013Gammtech CorporationStacker, stacking system or assembly and method for stacking
DE1253142B *Apr 7, 1965Oct 26, 1967Oluf EichlerVorrichtung zum Aufeinanderstapeln von beutelartigen Verpackungen od. dgl.
EP0006771A1 *Apr 27, 1979Jan 9, 1980S.A. MartinMethod and device for stacking blanks
WO1991009804A1 *Jan 3, 1991Jul 6, 1991Brown John Dev IncSheet control apparatus and method for sheet stacker
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/788.3, 414/793.4, 414/791, 318/39, 414/901, 414/790.8
International ClassificationB65H43/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S414/115, B65H43/00
European ClassificationB65H43/00