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Publication numberUS3006552 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1961
Filing dateMar 23, 1959
Priority dateMar 23, 1959
Publication numberUS 3006552 A, US 3006552A, US-A-3006552, US3006552 A, US3006552A
InventorsFerris David R
Original AssigneeKysor Heater Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermostatically actuated valve for regulating vacuum connections
US 3006552 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. R. FERRIS THERMOSTATICALLY ACTUATED VALVE FOR Oct. 31, 1961 REGULATING VACUUM CONNECTIONS Filed March 25, 1959 mw am WF f, MR U .W W v 0@ wim@ w\\\\\\\\\\wN A7' TURA/ET United States Patent O 3,006,552 THERMOSTATICALLY ACTUATED VALVE FOR REGULATING VACUUM CONNECTIONS David R. Ferris, Cadillac, Mich., assignor to Kysor Heater Company, Cadillac, Mich.

Filed Mar. 23, 1959, Ser. No. 801,030 11 Claims. (Cl. 236-353) This invention relates to improvements in thermostatically actuated valve for regulating vacuum connections.

The principal objects of this invention are:

First, to provide a relatively simple valve for accurately regulating the application of a subatmospheric pressure or vacuum to a pressure responsive device.

Second, to provide a temperature responsive valve for alternately connecting an abnormal pressure such as a vacuum or atmospheric pressure to a pressure actuated element in which the movement of the valve to shut oit the abnormal pressure also admits atmospheric pressure to the element and is effected rapidly by a spring after suihcient compression has been built up in the spring to cause the valve to tactuate with a snap action.

Tnird, to provide a vacuum valve that is immediately responsive to changes in temperature of its controlling element .and which is not apt to get out of order.

Fourth, to provide a thermostatically actuated pressure control valve which renders practical the useof engine vacuum for regulating the radiator shutter of an automotive vehicle in response to changes in temperature in the cooling jacket of the vehicle engine.

Other objects and advantages of the invention Will be apparent from a consideration ofthe following description and claims. The drawings of which there is one sheet illustrates a highly practical form of the invention.

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary longitudinal cross sectional view through -the valve showing the valve mounted on an internal combustion engine and connected to a radiator shutter operating mechanism. The engine and the shutter mechanism are shown more or less conventionally.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary enlarged cross sectional View through the thermo-responsive actuating element of the valve.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary cross sectional View through the valve showing the relationship of the valve seats to each other and to the movable valve element.

The present valve constitutes an improvement on and variation of the temperature responsive valves shown in Patents 2,105,193, 2,248,094 and 2,512,548. Speciiically the present valve assembly is designed to render the use of the vacuum in an internal combustion engine intake manifold suitable as a source of power for actuating a shutter associated with the radiator of the engine.

In FIG. 1 there is conventionally illustrated an internal combustion engine having a cylinder block 1 and head 2 with coolant passages 3 3 therein. The intake manifold of the engine which is under a vacuum when the engine is in operation is conventionally illustrated at 4 and the valve assembly 5 of the invention is mounted on the head 2 with its thermo-responsive element 6 projecting into the coolant passage 3. The valve 5 is connected to the manifold 4 as a source of vacuum by the pipe or conduit 7 and is further connected by the pipe or conduit 8 to a pressure differential power device or motor 9 conventionally illustrated as a diaphragm 10 mounted in a housing and subjected on one side to the pressure existing in the pipe 8. A piston rod 11 projects downwardly from the diaphragm and is connected to the operating bar 12 which connects to the brackets 13 secured to the several shutter slats 14. The shutter slats 14 are pivotally supported at their lower corners as at 15 to the fname of a radiator conventionally illustrated at 16. The spring 17 in the diaphragm housing 9 biases Mice the piston rod downwardly so that the shutter slats 14 are normally open when no vacuum is applied to the conduit 8 and the housing 9. An external spring 18 acting on one of the shutter slats assists the spring 17 so that the shutter will fail safe or open in the event of dam-age to the valve or any of its connections.

The construction of the valve 5 consists of a housing 19 having a threaded neck 20 engaged through the Wall of the cylinder head 2. The thermo-responsive element 6 has a tube 21 screwed into the end of the neck 20 and is provided with a hollow head 22 containing a mass 23 of thermally responsive semi-solid expansible material. When expanded, the material 23 presses against the diaphragm 24 and forces the rubber plunger 25 into the neck 21 to eject or extend the push pin 26 toward the housing 19. The housing 19 defines a central recess 27 with a second push pin 270 extending therefrom to the first push pin 26.

The outer end of the recess 2'7 is closed first by an inner valve bushing 28 and an outer bushing 29. The outer bushing 29 is threaded into the end of the recess in the housing and has an interrupted cylindrical flange 30 bearing against the inner bushing to push the inner bushing into the recess.

'Ihe outer bushing member 29 is provided with a central inner bore 31 forming Ia spring cavity the inner end of which forms ya relatively large circular valve seat at the junction of the bore and the end of the bushing. The bore 31 communicates with a passage 32 receiving the threaded coupling 33 for the vacuum supply pipe 7. Opposed to the spring cavity 31, the inner valve bushing 28 deiines a circular bore 34 with a relatively small seat around its outer end opening to an enlarged valve cavity 35. As appears most clearly in FG. 3 the valve cavity 35 contains a ball or other type valve 36 that is movable between the small seat at the end of the passage 34 and the large seat at the end of the spring cavity 31. In practice the length of movement of the valve element 36 from one seat to the other is maintained at about .005 inch or some such distance which is only long enough to break the closure at either seat.

Annular O-rings 37 positioned around the exterior of the bushings 28 and 29 .seal the bushings to the inner surface of the recess in the housing on opposite sides of the valve element 36. A radially extending passage 38 is formed by the discontinuity in the ange 30 on the valve cavities 31 and 35 and an annular passage 39 around the outer bushing. The pipe or conduit 8 communicates with this annular space 39 through the threaded coupling 40.

The ball valve element 36 is normally biased toward the small seat at the end of the passage 34 by a spring 41 positioned in the bore 31. The spring 41 is strong enough to resist the tendency of .the vacuum created in the engine manifold to unseat the valve from the end of the passage 34 and the vacuum of the manifold is thus connected through the radial passages 38 to the pipe 8 and vacuum motor 9 to raise the diaphragm 1t) and the piston rod 11 and close the shutter slats 14 Whenever the engine is operating and is cold.

Within the recess 27 in the valve body the end of the push pin 270 is provided with a head 42. The head and therefore the pin are normally pressed toward the thermo element 6 by a spring 43 bearing between the head 42 and the inner bushing 28. This latter spring compresses the thermally expansible mass in the thermo element as the mass cools. The head 42 on the push pin also bears `against a concentrically arranged inner spring 44 which has its outer end abutted against a head 45 on a tappet 45 that is supported in slidable, non-sealable relation in the previously delined bore 34 in the inner bushing 28. A spring 47 compressed between the bushj ing 28 and the head 45 opposes the action of the spring 44. The tappet 46 is adapted to project into contact with the ball valve element 36 and unseat the valve from the relatively small seat around the passage 34.

Atmospheric pressure is admitted to the cavity 27 withirr the valve housing through radially extending bores 48 and a fiber lter or screen 49 portion over the ends of the bores prevents the entry of dust into the valve mechanism. With the engine starting from a cold condition the vacuum from the manifold will be connected to the shutter motor 9 as previously described and the shutter slats 14 are retained closed preventing cooling action by the radiator 16. As the temperature of the collant in the engine rises, heating the thermally expansive mass 23, the push pins 26, 270 and the head 42 will be extended against the compression of the spring 43. At the same time the inner operating spring 44 will be compressed against the returning force of the backing spring 47 and the spring 41 until sufficient force is built up inthe spring 44 to overcome the combined pressure of springs 41 and 47. At this time the spring 44 will move the tappet 46 with a quick snap action to unseat the ball valve 36 from its seat at the end of the passage 34 and move .the valve against the relatively large seat at the end of the spring cavity 31. As the surface of the valve comes in contact with the large seat the action of the .vacuum assists in holding the valve to the larger seat and in speeding the shifting of the valve element. At this time atmospheric pressure is admitted through the filter 49, passage 48 and bore 34 to the valve cavity 35 thus breaking the vacuum through the pipe S to the pressure motor 9 and the springs 17 and 1S function to move the shutter slats 14 to open position so that the cooling action of the radiator is available to prevent over heating of the coolant in the jacket 3 of the engine. The reverse action of the valve when the coolant reaches a predetermined low temperature relaxes the extending pressures on the push pin 270 so that the pressure in the spring 44 is relaxed and the springs 41 and 47 return the ball valve and the tappet 46 to close off the atmospheric air passage 34 and readmit vacuum to the pressure motor 9.

The valve, as thus described, is relatively inexpensive and easy to manufacture as the only close tolerances required are the relative length of the valve cavity 35 and the size of lthe valve element 36 compared to the length of the flange 30 on the outer bushing. Once assembled, there are no parts in the valve assembly that can become misplaced. Due to the very short travel of the valve element between its opposed seats the action of the valve is very rapid and the wear on the valve element and its associate valve seats is negligible. The valve is thus well adapted to reliably control a radiator shutter within very close limits of temperature differential in the coolant of the engine.

The temperature at which the valve will be actuated may be adjusted by screwing the outer bushing 29 a diierent distance into the end of the housing. This varies Y the position of the inner bushing 28 and the ball valve 36 with reference to the push pins 26 and 270. The outer bushing is locked in its adjusted position bythe lock nut 50. Since the semi-solid expansihle material 23 in the thermal element 22 moves the pin 26 a definite distance for any degree of temperature rise, changing the position of the ball 36 changes the temperature at which the valve will operate.

The operating temperature may also be adjusted by varying .the extension of the neck 21 of the thermo element into the neck of the housing 19. This Varies the temperature at which the irst push pin 26 will be effective to actuate the second push pin 270. The thermo element is locked in its adjusted position by the lock nut 51. In either case, the outer valve bushing 29 locates the inner bushing 28 relative to the thermo element 6 and simultaneously locates the vacuum or abnormal pressure valve seat around the edge of the bore 31 in predetermined closely spaced relation to the Iball valve 36 when the valve is seated against the port at the end of the bore 34.

While the valve is especially adapted for regulating or controlling sub-atmospheric or vacuum pressures, it may also be used to regulate super atmospheric pressure applied through the pipe 7. In this latter case it is desirable to provide an outwardly facing fixed stop or shoulder (not illustrated) in the recess 27 against which the inner bushing 28 is positively seated by pressure of the outer bushing 29. This prevents temperature adjustment by movement of the outer bushing but prevents the super atmospheric pressure from acting on the inner bushing 28 like a piston to vary the temperature setting of the valve.

Whether the valve is used to control a subatmospheric pressure source or a super atmospheric pressure source, the spring 44 which actuates the tappet 46 and the valve element 56 functions as a yieldable motion transmitting element between the push pin 279 and the head 45 on the tappet. This is essential to permit unrestricted extension of the push pin 26 underthe expanding pressure of the semi-solid thermally expansible material 23. It should be noted that the power developed by expansion of the expansible material 23 is substantially greater than the resistance created -by any of the springs in the valve so that the springs are readily compressed and do not aiiect the temperature at which the valve operates.

In operation of the valve starting with a cold engine the initial extension of the push pin 270 merely compresses the spring 44 suiiciently to overcome the reverse pressure developed by the springs 41 and 47. When this resistance is overcome the ball 36 is unseated iirom the small valve seat around the end of the passage 34 and moves immediately to the large seat around the end of the bore 31. Once unseated from the small valve seat atmospheric pressure acts on the ball to quickly seat it against the end yof the vacuum passage thus creating a snap or quick action in the valve and partially releasing the compression developed in the spring 41.

If the expansible material 23 in the thermo element body immediately begins to cool the push pin 26 is caused to retract by the outer spring 43 until the compression in spring 44 is overcome by the spring 311 to reopen the vacuum connection.

What is claimed as new is:

1. A thermally actuated valve for regulating a source of vacuum from an internal combustion engine manifold in response to the cooling jacket of the engine comprising a housing adapted to be threaded into an opening in a Wall of said jacket, a thermally responsive element carried on the end of said housing to project into said jacket and having a mass of thermally expansible material adapted to push on a push pin positioned in a bore in the end of said housing, a recess in said housing opening to said pin, an air passage with a filter thereover opening from said recess to the outside of said housing, a pair of valve bushings arranged in end to end abutted relation in the opposite end of said recess with the outer bushing threaded into the housing, means including O-rings around said bushings forming seals 4'between the exteriors of the bushings and the wall of said recess, the inner one of said bushings having a cavity formed in the end thereof opposed to the other bushing, a ball valve element positioned in said cavity, a guideway extending axially through the inner of said bushings from the bottom of said cavity and having a relatively small valve seat around its outer end adapted to be closed by said valve element, a rst spring compressed between said inner bushing and said push pin t-o return the pin when the thermal element cools, a tappet slidably and non-sealingly positioned in said guideway and adapted to contact and unseat said valve element from said small seat, a second spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, a third spring abutted between saidtappet and said inner bushing and opposing said second spring, a passage formed in the outer bushing and having a relatively large valve seat formed around its inner end and spaced from said small seat by a distance about .005 inch greater than the effective length of said valve element to be closed by the valve element when the latter is unseated from the small seat by said tappet, said passage in said outer bushing being adapted to be connected to the manifold of said engine, a fourth spring biasing said valve element toward said small seat, and means forming a flow passage through said outer bushing and said housing from said cavity and between said seals and adapted at its outer end for connection to a shutter actuating pressure operated device.

2. A thermally actuated valve for regulating a source of vacuum from an internal combustion engine manifold in response to the temperature in the cooling jacket of the engine comprising a housing adapted to be threaded into an opening in a wall of said jacket, a thermally responsive element carried on the end of said housing to project into said jacket and having a mass of thermally expansible material adapted to push on a push pin positioned in a bore in the end of said housing, a recess in said housing opening to said pin, an air passage opening from said recess to the outside of said housing, a pair of valve bushings arranged in end to end relation in the opposite end of said recess, means forming seals between the exterior of the bushings and the wall of said recess, one of said bushings having a cavity formed in the end thereof opposed to the other bushing, a ball valve element positioned in said cavity, a guideway extending axially through the inner of said bushings and having a relatively small valve seat around its outer end adapted to be closed by said valve element, a rst spring compressed between said inner bushing and said push pin to return the pin when the thermal element cools, a tappet slidably and non-sealingly positioned in said guideway and adapted to contact and unseat said valve element from said small seat, a second spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, a third spring abutted between said tappet and said inner bushing and opposing said second spring, a passage formed in the outer bushing and having a relatively large valve seat formed around its inner end and spaced from said small seat by a distance about .005 inch greater than the effective length of said valve element to be closed by the valve element when the latter is unseated from the small seat by said tappet, said passage in said outer bushing being adapted to be connected to the manifod of said engine, a fourth spring biasing said valve element toward said small seat, and means forming a ilow passage through said housing from said cavity and between said seals and adapted at its outer end for connection to a shutter actuating pressure operated device.

3. A thermally actuated valve for regulating a source of abnormal pressure developed by an internal combustion engine in response to the temperature in the cooling jacket of the engine comprising a housing adapted to be threaded into an opening in a wall of said jacket, a thermally responsive element carried on the end of said housing to project into said jacket and having a mass of thermally expansible material adapted to push on a push pin positioned in a bore in the end of said housing, a recess in said housing opening to said pin, a pair of valve bushings arranged in end to end relation in the opposite end of said recess with the outer bushing threaded into the housing and locating the inner bushing, O-rings around said bushings forming seals between the exterior of the bushings and the wall of said recess, one of said bushings having a cavity formed in the end thereof opposed to the other bushing, a valve element positioned in said cavity, a guideway extending axially through the inner of said bushings and having a relatively small valve seat around its outer end adapted to be closed by said valve element, a rst spring compressed between said inner bushing and said push pin, a tappet slidably and non-sealingly positioned in said guideway and adapted to contact and unseat said valve element from said small seat, a second spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, a passage formed in the outer bushing and having a relatively large valve seat formed around its inner end and spaced from said small seat by a distance about .005 inch greater than the eliective length of said valve element to be closed by the valve element when the latter is unseated from the small seat by said tappet, said passage in said outer bushing being adapted to be connected to the manifold of said engine, a third spring biasing said valve element toward said small seat, and means forming a flow passage from said cavity and between said seals and adapted at its outer end for connection to a shutter actuating pressure operated device.

4. A thermally actuated valve for regulating a source of-vacuum in response to the temperature comprising a housing adapted to be mounted over an opening in a wall enclosing the material the temperature of which is to be sensed, a thermally responsive element carried on the end of said housing to project into said wall and having a mass of thermally expansible material adapted to push on a push pin positioned in a bore in the end of said housing, a recess in said housing opening to said pin, an air passage opening from said recess to the outside of said housing, a pair of valve bushings arranged in end to end relation in the opposite end of said recess, one of said bushings having a projection on its end abutting the other bushing and forming a space between the bushings, one of said bushings having a cavity formed in the end thereof opposed to the other bushing, a valve element positioned in said cavity, a guideway extending axially through the inner of said bushings and having a relatively small valve seat around its outer end adapted to be closed by said valve element, a rst spring compressed between a point tixed relative to said housing and said push pin to return the pin when the thermal element cools, a tappet slidably and non-sealingly positioned in said guideway and adapted to contact and unseat said valve element from said small seat, a second spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, a third spring abutted between said tappet and said inner bushing and opposing said second spring, a passage formed in the outer bushing and having a relatively large valve seat formed around its inner end and spaced from said small seat by a distance about .005 inch greater than the effective length of said valve element to be closed by the valve element when the latter is unseated from the small seat by said tappet, said passage in said outer bushing being adapted to be connected to a source of vacuum, a fourth spring biasing said valve element toward said small seat, and means forming a iloW passage through said housing from said cavity and adapted at its outer end for connection to a pressure operated device.

5. A thermally actuated valve for regulating a source of abnormal pressure in response to temperature comprising a housing adapted to be mounted over an opening in a wall enclosing the material the temperature of which is to be sensed, a thermally responsive element carried on the end of said housing to project into said wall and having a mass of thermally expansible material adapted to push on a push pin positioned in a bore in the end of said housing, a recess in said housing opening to said pin, an air passage opening from said recess to the outside of said housing, a pair of valve bushings arranged in end to end relation in the opposite end of said recess, one of said bushings having a projection thereon engaging the other bushing to form a space between the bushings, one of said bushings having a cavity formed in the end thereof opposed to the other bushing, a valve element positioned in said cavity, a guideway extending axially through the inner of said bushings and having a relatively small valve seat around its outer end adapted to be closed by said Valve element, a rst spring compressed between a point lixed relative to said housing and said push pin to return the pin when the thermal element cools, a tappet slidably and non-sealingly positioned in said guideway and adapted to contact and unseat said valve element from said small seat, a second spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, a passage formed in the outer bushing and having a relatively large valve seat formed around its inner end and spaced from said small seat by a distance only slightly greater than the effective length of said valve element to be closed by the valve element when the latter is unseated from the small seat by said tappet, said passage in said outer bushing being adapted to be connected to said source of pressure, a third spring biasing said valve element toward said small seat, and means forming a flow passage through said housing from said cavity and adapted at its outer end for connection to a pressure operated device.

6. A thermostatically actuated valve comprising means forming a valve cavity with opposed large and small seats at opposite ends thereof, a ball valve element positioned in said cavity and adapted to alternatively close against said seats with a movement of the order of .0015 inch, a `first spring biasing said valve element to said small seat, a tappet positioned through said small seat to move said valve element against said large seat, a thernio-responsive element having a push pin opposed to said tappet and extensible towards the tappet when the thermo-responsive element is heated, a second spring biasing said push pin to retracted position independently of said tappet, a third spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, a fourth spring biasing said tappet toward said push pin, means connecting said small valve seat to the atmosphere, means adapted to connect said large seat to a source of vacuum, and means adapted to connect said valve cavity to a pressure differential actuated motor.

7. A thermostatically actuated Valve comprising means forming a Valve cavity with opposed large and small seats at yopposite ends thereof, a ball valve element positioned in said cavity and adapted to alternatively close against said seats with a small movement sufficient to break the closure at either seat, a first spring biasing said valve element to said small seat, a tappet positioned through said small seat to move said valve element against said iirst spring, a thermo-responsive element having a push pin opposed to said tappet and extensible towards the tappet when the thermo-responsive element is heated, a second spring biasing said push pin to retracted position independently of said tappet, a third spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, means connecting said small valve seat to the atmosphere, means adapted to connect said large seat to a source of abnormal pressure, and means adapted to connect said valve cavity to a pressure differential actuated motor.

8. A thermostatically actuated valve comprising means forming a valve cavity with opposed large and small seats at opposite ends thereof, a valve element positioned in said cavity and adapted to alternatively close against said seats with a movement of the order of .O inch, a rst spring biasing said valve element to said small seat, a tappet positioned to Imove said valve element against said large seat, a thermo-responsive element having a push pin opposed to said tappet and extensible towards the tappet when the thermo-responsive element is heated, a second spring biasing said push pin to retracted position independently of said tappet, a third spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, means connecting said small valve seat to the atmosphere, means adapted to connect said large seat to a source of vacuum, and means adapted to connect said valve cavity to a pressure diierential actuated motor.

9. A thermostatically actuated valve comprising means forming a valve cavity with opposed large and small seats at opposite ends thereof, a valve element positioned in said cavity and adapted to alternatively close against said seats with amovement no greater thannecessary to break the closure at either seat, a iirst spring biasing said valve element to said small seat, a tappet positioned to move said valve element toward said large seat, a thermo-responsive element having a push pin opposed to said tappet and extensible towards the tappet when the thermoresponsive element is heated, a second spring biasing said push pin to retracted position independently of said tappet, a third spring abutted between said push pin and said tappet, means connecting said small valve Vseat to the atmosphere, means adapted to connect said large seat to a source of vacuum, and means adapted to connect said valve cavity to a pressure diierential actuated motor.

10. A thermostatically actuated valve comprising means forming a valve cavity with opposed seats at opposite ends thereof, a valve element positioned in said cavity and adapted to alternatively close against said seats with a movement no greater than necessary to break the closure at either seat, a iirst spring biasing said valve element to one seat, a tappet positioned to move said valve element toward the other seat, a thermo-responsive element containing a semi-solid thermally expansible material extensible towards the tappet when the thermoresponsive element is heated, a second spring biasing said tappet to retracted position, a yieldable thrust transmitting element located in thrust relation between said tappet and said thermo-responsive element, means connectv ing said rst valve seat to the atmosphere, means adapted to connect said other seat to a source of abnormal pressure, and means adapted to connect said valve cavity to a pressure diierential actuated motor.

1l. In combination with a vehicle having an internal combustion engine with a liquid cooling system and a radiator for the cooling system, and an intake manifold as part of the engine subject to vacuum conditions in operation, means for regulating the operation of the radiator to control the temperature in the cooling system comprising shutter elements arranged to restrict the iiow of air through the radiator and movable between open and closed positions, means biasing said shutters to vopen position, a pressure diierential motor connected to move said shutters to yclosed position upon application of vacuum pressures to the motor, a thermostatically actuated Valve having means forming a valve cavity with opposed seats at opposite ends thereof, a valve element positioned in said cavity and adapted to alternatively close against said seats with a small movement, a rst spring biasing said valve element toward one of said seats, a tappet extending through said one seat to move said valve element toward the other seat against the pressure of said first spring, a thermo-responsive element positioned in the cooling system of said engine and having a push pin opposed to said tappet and extensible toward the tappet when the thermoresponsive element is heated, a second spring biasing said push pin -to retracted position independently of said tappet, means forming a yieldable thust transmitting connection between said push pin and said tappet, means connecting said one seat to the atmosphere, means connecting said other seat of said valve to the intake manifold of said engine, and means connecting said valve cavity to said pressure motor.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 920,883 Rui May 4, 1909 2,037,911 Larson Apr. 21, 1936 2,248,094 Kysor July 8, 1941 2,581,582 Ferris Jan. 8, 1952 2,829,837 Willcox Apr. 8, 1958 2,830,767 Herbenar Apr. 15, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US920883 *Jul 26, 1907May 4, 1909Charles J TagliabueThermostatic temperature-regulator.
US2037911 *Feb 14, 1935Apr 21, 1936Nat Regulator CoThermostatic controlling apparatus
US2248094 *Feb 8, 1937Jul 8, 1941Kysor Walter AShutter mechanism and thermostatic control therefor
US2581582 *Nov 28, 1949Jan 8, 1952Kysor Heater CompanyThermostatically operated valve
US2829837 *Nov 4, 1952Apr 8, 1958Willcox William LThermostatically controlled valve for suction responsive devices
US2830767 *Jan 6, 1956Apr 15, 1958Thompson Prod IncSelector valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3236452 *Dec 3, 1962Feb 22, 1966Robertshaw Controls CoDual passage thermostatic valve
US3313485 *Sep 20, 1965Apr 11, 1967Kysor Industrial CorpTemperature actuated valves
US3333770 *Jul 22, 1966Aug 1, 1967Gen Motors CorpVacuum position servo system
US4177924 *Nov 23, 1977Dec 11, 1979Robertshaw Controls CompanyCondition responsive valve construction and method of making the same
US4185772 *May 11, 1978Jan 29, 1980Robertshaw Controls CompanyCondition response differential vacuum regulator and method of making the same
US4205784 *Sep 26, 1978Jun 3, 1980Kysor Industrial CorporationTemperature actuated multiple function fluid control valve
US4483287 *May 10, 1982Nov 20, 1984Kysor Industrial CorporationMechanical engine protection system
US4526140 *Sep 4, 1984Jul 2, 1985Kysor Industrial CorporationMechanical engine protection system
DE1550349B1 *Jan 26, 1966May 31, 1972Kysor Industrial CorpThermostatisch gesteuertes umschaltventil ohne ventilhubueberschneidung der beiden ventilwege
Classifications
U.S. Classification236/35.3, 236/86, 236/99.00K, 236/99.00R
International ClassificationF16K31/68, F01P7/12, G05D23/185, F01P7/00, F16K31/64
Cooperative ClassificationF01P7/12, G05D23/185
European ClassificationG05D23/185, F01P7/12