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Publication numberUS3010140 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1961
Filing dateApr 2, 1959
Priority dateApr 2, 1959
Publication numberUS 3010140 A, US 3010140A, US-A-3010140, US3010140 A, US3010140A
InventorsThomas Walter N
Original AssigneeThomas Walter N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid shoe polish applicator
US 3010140 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States 3,010,140 LIQUID SHOE POLISH APPLICATOR Walter N Thomas, 3445 Rhodes Ave., Chicago, Ill. Filed Apr. 2, 1959, Ser. No. 803,639 3 Claims. (Cl. 15-592) My invention relates to a liquid shoe polish applicator, and more particularly, to a liquid shoe polish applicator that is in effect a self-contained shoeshine kit, yet which is proportioned to easily fit in the palm of ones hand.

Liquid shoe polishes, and particularly those of the neutral type, are supposed to be self-polishing and when applied correctly to ones shoes in an even coating, they provide the desired shine without brushing, with the consequent savings of time and effort. However, the liquid must necessarily be contained in some form of receptacle, and so far as I am aware, no efiicient device has been to date devised that satisfactorily and consistently transfers adequate but not excessive amounts of the liquid from the receptacle to the surface of the shoe while avoiding spillage and/or the soiling of ones hands or apparel.

Conventional liquid shoe polish applicators generally take the form of a brush or sponge dauber element attached to the receptacle stopper that is removed from the receptacle with the stopper when access to the polish is desired. The brush or sponge dauber element is rubbed against the shoe surface to apply the polish, re-charge being effected when needed by dipping the dauber element into the liquid within the receptacle. The dauber element remains immersed in the polish while the stopper is in place in the receptacle opening, and is thus overcharged when initially applied to ones shoes, resulting in wastage and soilage of ones hands and clothes. Recharging of the dauber element also effects a similar overcharging thereof with like results.

A principal object of my invention is to provide a liquid shoe polish applicator in which the dauber portion thereof remains in place on the receptacle and in which the polish is supplied to the dauber portion, when the applicator is in use, to apply polish to ones shoes in a continuous and uniform flow.

A further principal object of my invention is to provide a liquid shoeshine applicator in which the receptacle for the polish serves as a handle for manipulating the daubcr portion when applying polish to ones shoes.

Yet a further principal object of the invention is to provide a novel stopper and cover or closure combination for liquid shoe polish applicators which insures uniform application of polish to ones shoes on each use thereof regardless of the length of time between use, as well as a complete seal against leakage and exposure of the volatile polish liquid to air.

Further objects of the invention are to provide a liquid shoe polishing applicator that is especially adapted for use in vending machines and for carrying in ones pocket or pocketbook, which provides an effective seal against leakage when not in use, and which is inexpensive of manufacture, convenient in use and readily adapted for applying liquid polish to all shoes, boots and the like that take polish.

Other objects, uses and advantages will be obvious or become apparent from a study of the following detailed description and the application drawing.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention, with the closure or cap thereof in place over the applicator dauber portion;

FIGURE 2 is an exploded perspective view of the device shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal cross-section al view through the device of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic perspective view illustrating the manner in which the device may be employed to apply polish to a shoe; and

FIGURE 5 is a fragmental longitudinal cross-sectional view through the applicator when in its inverted polishapplying position.

Reference numeral 10 of FIGURES 1, 3 and 4 generally indicates a preferred embodiment of the invention, which, as shown in FIGURE 2, generally comprises a container or receptacle 12 for the liquid polish, a stopper or plug member 14 mounted within the access opening 16 of the container 12 and including a dauber portion 17, and a cap or cover 18 that is applied over the container access opening 16 and the stopper member 14 when the device is not in use.

The container or receptacle 12 in the illustrated embodiment is formed from polystyrene and is elongate and relatively narrow in configuration. Preferably, the container 12 is proportioned to easily fit within the palm of ones hand. One end of the container 12 is imperforate as at 20, while the other end of the container 12 is formed to provide access opening 16. The outer peripheral surface 21 of the container adjacent access opening 16 is formed with annular recesses 23 and 25 separated by an annular ridge 27 which cooperates with cap 18 to provide an effective seal against leakage, as hereinafter described.

The plug or stopper member 14 in the illustrated em bodiment comprises a cylindrical cork body 22 having formed therein a passage or tube 24 that extends between the inner and outer surfaces 26 and 28 thereof. The passage 24 is preferably of uniform cross-sectional dimension along its length and for convenience is disposed at the axial center of the stopper member 14.

The dauber portion 17 in the illustrated embodiment takes the form of a capillary disc 30 formed from an open cell foam material such as polyurethane. The disc 30 is bonded to the outer surface or face 28 of stopper member 14 by an appropriate cement 33, such as 1022 Cement made by Minneapolis Mining & Manufacturing Company. Disc 30 may be formed with a central perforation 32 that is aligned with the passage 24 of the stopper member 14.

The cap 13 is formed from a suitable flexible plastic material such as polyethylene and, as indicated in FIG URES 2 and 3, comprises a cup-shaped body 40 including a disc-like end wall 42 and an annular flange or side wall 44 integrally united with the wall 42 about the rim of the latter. The annular flange or wall 44 is preferably proportioned to frictionally engage the annular ridge 27 of container or receptacle 12.

The cover or cap 18 also includes an elongateprojec tion or stem 46 that is sufiiciently long in length to extend through the passage 24 of stopper member 14 when the cover or cap 18 is applied to the container (see FIG- URE 3) and in the form illustrated, the propection or stem 46 tapers between its end 48 and its juncture with wall 42 of cap 18. The maximum diameter of stem 46 is made somewhat in excess of the diameter of cork body passage 24. Cap 18 also includes an annular wall or extension 50 that is positioned between annular wall or flange 44 and the stem 46. Annular wall or extension 50 should be proportioned longitudinally of the axis of cap 18 to space cover wall 42 from compressing engagement with the foam material when the cover is pressed into place over the stopper member, and should be as thin as practicable.

Before the stopper or plug member 14 is applied to the container 12, the container 12 is substantially filled with a suitable type of liquid shoe polish 52, which is prefereably of the neutral type. The plug or stopper member 14, which is preferably pro-assembled to unite the disc 30 with cork body 22 as described above, is then inserted into the access opening 16 of the container no further than the point where the rim 54 of the container is substantially aligned with or just above the adhesive 33. lreferably, the plug or stopper member 14 is proportioned so that it seals ofi the container and in the illustrated embodiment, the cylindrical surface 58 of the cork body 22 as well as the abutting surface of the access opening 16 are coated with a substance suchas trichloroethylene to eficct a complete seal between the stopper member 14 and the container.

The chemical trichloroethylene dissolves the polystyrene which then flows into the pores of the cork body 22 to effect a perfect bond between the container 12 and the plug or stopper member 14.

The device when charged with liquid polish may be stored indefinitely, regardless of whether it is positioned upright or upside down. When not in use, the cap 18 is applied to the container 12 in the manner indicated in FIGURE 3 with the result that the passage 24 of the cork body 22 is plugged or sealed off by projection or stem 46 and annular wall or flange 44 of cap 18 sealingly engages the annular ridge 27 of the container. The material from which the cap 18 is formed makes it sufficiently flexible to permit the stem 46 and the annular wall 44 to conform to any irregularities in passage 24 and the container annular ridge 27, respectively, and thus the container is relatively rigid as compared to cap 18, The thicker end of stem 46 compresses the cork material defining passage 24, which in addition tends to expand when dampened by the polish and this creates a highly effective liquid seal. And as indicated in FIGURE 3, the annular wall or extension 50 presses against the foam disc 30 to hold it firmly against the outer surface of cork body 22, while at the same time spacing wall 42 from the disc 36, thereby preventing the disc 30 as a Whole from being flattened on application to cap 18 to the container.

The container and cap when assembled are proportioned for application to vending machines and after purchase may be safely kept in ones pocket or pocketbook until needed.

When it is desired to use the device 10, the cap 18 is removed (the cap being knurled as at 60 to facilitate removal), andthe container is turned so that the polish 52 has access to the passage 24 of the cork body 22. The liquid polish flows evenly through the passage 24 to the central perforation 32 of foam disc 30 and becomes dispersed throughout the foam disc by capillary action. As the dauber portion 17 is rubbed over the surface of gnes shoe 62 in the manner indicated in FIGURE 4, the dauber portion 17 applies the polish to the shoe surface in a uniform and even coating which dries quickly. -As the polish leaves the applicator portion 17, it is replaced by further polish proceeding downwardly through the stopper member passage 24.

After use, the cap 18 is replaced to the position indicated in FIGURE 3 and the device stored until again neede It will therefore be seen that I have provided a shoe polish applicator having a number of important advantages For instance, the body of liquid polish within the container 12 is not dipped into by the dauber portion of the applicator, which eliminates contamination of the polish. Furthermore, the liquid body is sealed off from the dauber portion 17' by the stopper member which further insures against contamination of the liquid.

The stem or projection 46 of the cap or cover 18 when disposed in the passage 24 of stopper member 14 provides the principal seal of the device, and, when the cap 18 is in position on the container, is not only air tight (thus fully protecting the highly volatile shoe polish liquid) but also prevents the polish from having access to'the dauber portion 17 and filling the cover with excess polish that is wasted when the device it} is opened for use. The, stem or projection 46 automatically cleans out passage 24 after each use and (during storage) keeps the liquid polish away from the adhesive bonding the foam and cork material together, which minimizes any adverse eiiects of the polish on the adhesive. And when initially used, the dauber portion 17 is not unduly saturated, thereby permitting the polish to be applied to ones shoes, even from the beginning of the application process, in a thin, even coating for minimum drying time.

The automatic plugging of stopper member passage 24 by stem 46 also insures that the foam disc 30 will not tend to clog passage 24 due to shifting or deformation during use since stem 46 automatically re-forms perforation .32.

As already mentioned, the stem 46 and friction fit of cover 18 about annular ridge 27 provides a complete seal against leakage of liquid polish from the container when the device is not in use. Thus, a double liquid seal is provided in a device not requiring the expensive shrink band employed in the screw type cap containers for volatile liquids. If desired, the stem 46 may be employed to insert colored capsules into the container.

The annular wall or extension 50 not only protects the foam material 30 against smashing, but also holds the foam material 30 in place against shrinkage between periods of use.

in a successful embodiment of the invention, the container between its rim 54 and end wall 20 is approximately two inches long and has an internal diameter on the order of three-fourths of an inch. The cork body 22 has an external diameter on the order of three-fourths of an inch and is approximately three-eighths inch in thickness while the foam disc 30 is approximately oneeighth inch in thickness. Passage 24 of the cork body is approximately onesixteenth of an inch in diameter, as is the perforation 32. The cap 18 and its stem 46, annular flange 44 and annular wall 50 should be proportioned accordingly and in view of the relationships indicated in FIGURE 3.

As the foam disc 30 is relatively thin as compared to the thickness or length of cork body 22 axially of passage 24, the rate of liquid flow through passage 24 tends to be more uniform due to the fixed length of passag i 24 and the extended dimension of its length as compared to the corresponding length of perforation 32.

The foregoing description and the drawing are given merely to explain and illustrate my invention and the in.- vention is not to be limited thereto, except insofar as the appended claims are so limited, since those. skilled in the art who have my disclosure beforethem will be able to make modifications and variations therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

' I claim:

1. A liquid shoe polish applying device comprising an elongate cylindrical container proportioned to fitinto ones hand and having an opening formed in one end thereof and adapted to receive a quantity of liquid shoe polish, a stopper member formed from resilient material received in said opening and continuously bonded to said container about said opening, said stopper member being formed with a passage that extends between its inner and outer ends, a layer of foam material applied to the outer end of said stopper member and formed with a passage aligned with said stopper member passage, said layer of foam material beingrelatively thin axially of said passages as compared to the corresponding dimen: sion of said stopper member, and a cover adapted to be secured to the container over the outer end of said stopper member, said cover comprising a circular, impervious, well formed with an annular flexible flange about its rim, said flange being proportioned to frictionally engage about said one end of said container, said flange and said container being relatively flexible and rigid, respectively, an elongated projection extending from said circular wall and positioned to project into said passages when said cover has been applied to said one end of said container, said projection and said stopper member passage having like transverse cross-sectional configurations and said projection having a portion thereof of larger dimensions than the corresponding dimensions of said stopper member passage, said projection portion being positioned for reception in said stopper member passage when said flange of said cover is frictionally engaged about said one end of said container, whereby said projection portion is pressed into said stopper member passage when said cover flange is placed in frictional engagement with said one end of said container to seal off the stopper member passage, and a continuous wall projecting laterally of said circular Wall and between said flange and said projection, said continuous wall being proportioned longitudinally of the axis of said cover to space said wall from said foam material while pressing the portion of said foam material it contacts against said stopper member when said cover has been sufliciently applied to said one end of said container to press said projection portion into firm engagement with said stopper member passage.

2. A liquid shoe polish storing and applying device comprising an elongate cylindrical container formed from polystyrene having an opening formed in one end thereof and adapted to receive a quantity of liquid shoe polish, a cork stopper member received in said opening, said stopper member being proportioned to substantially complement said opening, means for effecting a liquid tight seal between said container and said stopper member, said means comprising solvent means for dissolving the material of said container that abuts said stopper member whereby the dissolved material flows into the pores of said stopper member and solidifies to effect said seal, a layer of polyurethane foam material bonded to the outer end of said stopper member, said stopper member being formed With a centrally disposed passage that extends between its inner and outer ends, said stopper memher being positioned within said opening with its outer end substantially flush with the rim of said opening, said foam material being formed with a passage aligned with said stopper member passage and a cover adapted to be secured to the container over the outer end of said stopper member, said cover comprising a generally cylindrical cup-shaped member including a circular, impervious wall and an annular flexible flange about the rim of said wall, said flange being proportioned to frictionally engage over said one end of said container, said cover further comprising a centrally disposed elongate tapered projection proportioned to seal ofl? said passage and extend therethrough when said cover has been applied to said one end of said container, and a continuous annular Wall interposed between said projection and said flange, said annular wall being proportioned to press said foam material against said stopper member when said cover has been applied to said one end of said container to pass said projection through said passage of said stopper member.

3. The device set forth in claim 2 wherein said one end of said container is formed with an annular sealing ridge thereabout, said flange of said cover frictionally engaging said ridge.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 179,892 Browne July 18, 1876 1,098,976 Rosenstein June 2, 1914 2,279,320 Huston Apr. 14, 1942 2,716,250 Deakers Aug. 30, 1955 2,878,500 Thorpe Mar. 24, 1959 2,896,236 Bartkewitz July 28, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 551,938 Belgium Nov. 14, 1956 805,997 Great Britain Dec. 17, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US179892 *May 16, 1876Jul 18, 1876Himself and Geoege WImprovement in mucilage-holders
US1098976 *Apr 19, 1913Jun 2, 1914Louis RosensteinDauber attachment for bottles.
US2279320 *Aug 8, 1939Apr 14, 1942Tom HustonCombined liquid dispensing and applying device
US2716250 *Aug 27, 1952Aug 30, 1955Ever Dry CorpDispenser and dispensing head constructed to deliver the contents of a container to a fabric for saturation
US2878500 *Aug 31, 1955Mar 24, 1959Edward Thorpe ThomasCleaning dabber
US2896236 *Jan 3, 1955Jul 28, 1959Paul BartkewitzMeans for cleaning and dressing footwear and the like
BE551938A * Title not available
GB805997A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4762433 *Jul 2, 1987Aug 9, 1988S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Fluid applicator for shoes and the like
US6076985 *Mar 4, 1999Jun 20, 2000L'orealPackaging and applicator device, and a refill element for such a device
US6283659Mar 4, 1999Sep 4, 2001L'orealPackaging and applicator device, and a refill element for such a device
US6290416Mar 4, 1999Sep 18, 2001L'orealPackaging and applicator device, and a refill element for such a device
US6305861 *Feb 25, 1997Oct 23, 2001L'orealPackaging and applicator device, and a refill element for such a device
US6478497 *Dec 21, 2001Nov 12, 2002Maria Inmaculada Nieto VillahozApplicator for footwear
US7866327May 15, 2000Jan 11, 2011L'orealDevice for packaging and applying a cosmetic, in particular for making up the lips
EP0192058A1 *Jan 20, 1986Aug 27, 1986Bramlage GmbHDispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/262, 401/266
International ClassificationA47L23/05, B65D47/42, B65D47/00, A47L23/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/42, A47L23/05
European ClassificationB65D47/42, A47L23/05