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Publication numberUS3011425 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 5, 1961
Filing dateJun 3, 1959
Priority dateJun 3, 1959
Publication numberUS 3011425 A, US 3011425A, US-A-3011425, US3011425 A, US3011425A
InventorsFred Grushoff
Original AssigneeNorbute Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fume hood with vented storage compartment
US 3011425 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 5, 1961 F. GRusHoFF FUME HOOD WITH VENTED STORAGE COMPARTMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 3, 1959 INVENTOR. f/ED GQUSHOFF.'

Dec. 5, 1961 F. GRusHol-F 3,011,425

FUME HOOD WITH VENTED STORAGE COMPARTMENT Filed June 5, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 L O INVENTOR.

55D GPUSHOF/-T Arron/Erf 3,011,425 ^Patented Dec. 5, 1961 3,011,425 FUME HOOD WITH VENTED STORAGE COMPAR'IMENT Fred Grusholf, Kew Gardens, N.Y., assignor to Norbute Corporation, New York, NX., a corporation of Delaware s Filed June 3, 1959. Ser. No. 817,940 5 Claims. (Cl. 98-115) This invention relates to fume hoods for drawing off toxic and noxious gases from materials placed therein and also to storage cabinets for storing such materials. More particularly, the invention relates to a combined fume hood and storage compartment.

Fume hoods and storage compartments for use in connection with chemicals, Vsolvents and the like, are well known in the art, and considerable effort has already been devoted to the eicient flushing of rfume hoods so as lto assure the complete removal of gases therefrom Without spillage of such gases into the surrounding area when the fume hood access window is open. It is also well known in the art to employ separate vented storage cabinets which usually comprise shelves and an exhaust duct connected thereto for drawing off fumes and gases from the cabinet. Y

However, it has been found in practice that those using fume hoods oftentimes mount shelves within the fume hood itself for the purpose of storing quantities of frequently used materials giving off toxic or noxious fumes. While this is done, of course, for the purpose of obviating the need to transport the particular materials back and forth betweenthe storage compartment and the fume hood, it does present a distinct disadvantage in that the shelving, and the containers for the materials stored inthe fume hood, interfere with the air flow pattern Within the hood, thus impairing eflicient iiushing of the hood.

In essence, the present invention contributes a combined fume hood and storage compartment which assures the desired air iiow pattern within the fume hood and also continuous flushing of the storage compartment, 4and at the same time provides accessibility of the materials storedl in the compartment from' the Working chamber of the fume Ihood.

As an important feature of the present concept, the fume hood and storage compartment are so arranged as to constitute a single unit and means are provided establishing communication between the working chamber of the fume hood and the storage compartment whereby the means for exhausting gases from the working chamber also exhaust gases lfrom the storage compartment.

As a further feature of the invention, an access opening may be provided in the partition separating the working chamber of the fume hood and the storage compartment, and means may then be provided which are operable to open and close this access opening. The storage compartment may, of course, have an additional opening providing access to its interior in the normal manner from v outside of the unit and this opening is also controlled by suitable closure means such as sliding glass doors.

As a further feature of the invention, the means establishing communication between the storage compartment and the fume hood for the passage of gases therethrough are so located relatively to the storage compartment as to assure the complete and efficient removal therefrom of gases that are both heavier than air and tend to fall and gases which are lighter than air and tend to rise. In order to assure the proper ilushing of the storage cabinet, means are also provided establishing communication between the interior of the cabinet and the ambient room atmosphere. The storage shelves within the cabinet are arranged to be slightly spaced from the walls thereof and are preferably fabricated of metal mesh so as to enable the air to iow freely around and through the shelves.

The present invention contemplates the combination of the storage cabinet with a fume hood of the type disclosed in co-pending application of Clio-rd A. Wojan, Serial No. 710,783 entitled Fume Hood, for example, and having a plenum chamber therein in communication with a suitable exhaust duct, the means establishing communication between the storage compartment and the fume hood constituting ports in the partition therebetween so arranged asto permit gases to flow from thefcompartment into the plenum chamber. In this way, the exhaust system conncted to the plenum chamber will be effective in the storage compartment, b-ut the air flowing from the storage compartment will not interfere with the air iloW pattern in the Working chamber of the fume hood.

There has thus been outlined rather broadly the most important features of the present invention in order that a detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood and in order that the present contribution to the -art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of the invention that will be described hereafter and which will form the subject of claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which the present disclosure is based may readily be utilized as the basis for designing other structures for carrying out the several puroses of this invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions as do not depart from the concept and scope of this invention.

A specific embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description and is shown in the accompanng drawings, forming a part of the speciiication, wherein:

FIG. l is a fragmentary, front elevation view of a combined fume hood and storage compartment in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional View taken along the lines 2 2 of FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the lines 3 3 of FIG. l;

l vFIG. 4 is a side elevational' view of the device of FIG.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken along the lines 5 5 of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of the structure illustrated in FIG. 5.

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly, to FIGS. l and 2 thereof, there is shown a combined fume hood 10 and storage compartment 11 supported on av suitable base 13 and arranged in contiguous or juxtaposed relation so as to be separated by a common wall 12.

The fume hood 10 may be substantially similar to that shown and described in co-pending `application Serial No.

710,783 referred to hereinbefore and to which attention is invited for a detailed 'description thereof. For purposes of the present invention, however, a general description of .the fume hood will suf`n`ce. Accordingly, the fume hood10 may comprise generally the commonwall 12, face wall 14, .rear wall 15 and top and bottom walls 16 and 17, respectively, the latter of which may be a slab of stone or similar material. A sixth wall (not shown), isV of course, provided opposite the commonwall 12 to complete the enclosureconstituting the fume hood.

Within the hood v10 there are provided a main or working chamber 18 and plenum chambers 19 and 20, the first of which plenum chambers is formed by a partition 21 that is spaced from the rear Wall 15 and may extend parallel to that wall along a portion of its vertical length commencing from a, point slightly above the bottom wall 17, the upper region of the partition sloping forwardly to a point intermediate the walls 14 and 15 and slightly below the top wall 16. The spaces between the partition 21 and the upper and lower walls 16 and 17 permit communication between the Working chamber 118 and the plenum chamber 19, it being understood that this communication may be effected -by openings in the partion 21, or between the partition 21 and the wall 12 and the sixth wall (not shown).

The top wall 16 is ported, as at 22, and a duct 24 communicates through the port 22 with the upper portion of the plenum chamber 19 and leads to suitable exhaust blower (not shown).

The second plenum chamber 20 is formed by perforated plate means 25 which may be angularly connected to the face wall 14 and the top wall 16 intermediate the face and rear walls 14 and 15, respectively. This plate means may extend between the wall 12 and the sixth wall (not shown). A duct 26 communicates with this plenum chamber 20 through a port 23 and leads to a suitable blower for introducing air into the plenum chamber 20 and thus to the working chamber 18. The plate means 25 is formed aud arranged relatively to the working chamber 18 so as to control the path of air from the plenum chamber 20, through the working charnber 18 and to the plenum chamber 1-9, from which it is exhausted through duct 24, the details of this formation and arrangement being clearly set forth in application Serial No. 710,783 already alluded to.

The face. wall 14 has a vertical way 27 for receiving a vertically movable sash 29 having a transparent pane mounted therein. This wall 14 is also louvered as at 3) ladjacent the bottom wall 17 to admit atmospheric air into the lower part of the working chamber.

As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 5 the common wall 12 is formed with an opening 31 in which is mounted a sash frame y32 for slidably supporting a pair of glass panels 34 provided with finger grips 35, which may take the form of recesses, for example, on the side thereof facing the working chamber 1S.

Referring now to FIGS. l, 3 and 4 to 6, it .will be seen that the storage compartment 11 is juxtaposed relatively to the fume hood so that its rear wall is the common wall 12 between the two. Thus, the storage compartment 11 may be accessible from the exterior through its wall opposite the common wall 12 and is also accessible from the working chamber 1S of the fume hood through the access opening 31. The side walls of the compartment may thusr comprise extensions 14a and a of the face wall 14 and the rear wall 15, respectively, of the fume hood 10; and likewise the top and bottom walls 16a and 17a of the compartment may comprise extensions of top and bottom walls 16 and 17.

In the form of storage compartment that has been chosen for illustration, the front wall actually comprises upper and lower pairs of sliding glass panels 35, 36 and 37, 39, respectively, separated by a cross-brace 40 extending between the side walls 14a and 15a. This cross-brace 40 is formed with upper and lower ways 41 and 42 which cooperate respectively with opposed ways 44 and 45 in upper and lower walls 16a and 17a, respectively, to slidably support the panels 35, 36 and 37, 39. Suitable nger grips 46 are provided on the glass panels and may conveniently take the form of recesses. It will be understood, of course, that the exterior access openings in the storage compartment may be provided in any of the exterior walls thereof and need not necessarily be in the wall opposite the common wall 12. Additional louvered openings'43 are provided in the storage compartment, preferably in the lower part of the front wall thereof, as shown, to permit ambient air to enter the compartment 11.

The interior of the storage compartment 11 is tted with a series of shelves 47 which may be supported on movable pegs 49 insertable into selected recesses 5t) in the walls 14a and 15a whereby the shelves 47 may be raised or lowered to accommodate storage material of various sizes. The shelves are preferably so proportioned as to be supported by the pegs 49 in slightly spaced relation to the surrounding wall surfaces, as clearly shown in FIGS. 3, 5 and 6, in order that air and gases may ow freely therebetween. Additionally, the shelves 47 are preferably formed of corrosion resistant mesh, such as of stainless steel, for example, so that air and gas may pass therethrough.

In accordance with the present concept, at least one opening is provided in the common wall 12 establishing communication between the storage compartment 1.1 and the rst plenum chamber 19 in order that the means exhausting gases from the plenum chamber will also serve to exhaust the storage compartment; but for best results, it is preferred, that two such openings 51 and 52 be furnished, one at the lower end of the plenum chamber 19, adjacent the intersection of the walls 17 and 15, and the other at the upper region of the plenum chamber adjacent the intersection of the Walls 15 and 16. In this way, and because gases in the storage compartment are free to move vertically, around and through the shelves, gases which are heavier than air and tend to fall, as well -as Vthose which are lighter than air and tend to rise are drawn off and exhausted.

yFrom the foregoing description, it will be seen that the present concept constributes a novel combined fume hood and storage compartment so arranged that materials stored in the compartment -are accessible from the working chamber within the hood and yet, do not interfere.

with the desired ow pattern of flushing air passing through the hood, nor do they occupy space in the working chamber. Furthermore, as the fume hood is ilushed by air entering through the second plenum chamber 20 or through the chamber 20 and the face wall opening, and leaving Ithrough the rst plenum chamber 19, regardless of the position of the sash 29, as explained in detail in the copending application 710,783, already referred to, the storage compartment is also flushed by air entering the louvered openings 43 therein and ilcwing around Iand through the shelves 47 and into the plenum chamber 19 and the exhaust duct 24. In this connection, it is preferred that, if upper and lower openings such as at 52 and 51 are used, the total area of the louvered openings be at least slightly greater than one of the openings 52 and 51, thus to assure an air supply for the storage compartment suiicient to allow an ample air flow through both of the openings 51 and 52. It should also be noted that the present invention assures. eflicient continuous ushing of both heavier and lighterv than air gases from the storage compartment.

While the invention has been described in detail with respect to a preferred embodiment, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and it is intended to cover all such changes and modifications in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A device of the class described comprising, in combination: a multi-walled fume hood having a working chamber and tirst and second plenum chambers each in communication with said working chamber whereby gases may flow therebetween, a multi-walled storage cornpartment, said hood and compartment being in juxtaposed relation to one another so as to be separated by a Vcommon wall, an access opening in said common wall, closure means operable to open land close said access opening to provide access between said working chamber and said compartment, means for exhausting gases from said rst plenum chamber and thus from said working chamber, means for supplying air to said second plenum chamber and thus to said working chamber whereby said second plenum chamber and air supply means and said rst plenum chamber and gas exhaust means cooperate to flush said working chamber, means establishing cornmunication between said compartment and the atmosphere, and apertures in said common wall establishing continuous communication between the upper and lower regions of said sto-rage compartment and said rst plenum chamber whereby said means for exhausting said rst plenum chamber and said working chamber also exhaust said storage compartment said means establishing communication between said compartment and the atmosphere being greater in area than either of said apertures in the common wall establishing continuous communica tion between the upper and lower regions of the storage compartment and the first plenum chamber.

2. In a device of the class described including a fume hood having a rectangular cabinet formed of joined top, front, side and rear walls and adapted to be seated on a counter or base to define therewith la compartment, said top Wall having a pair of openings therein, one'of said pair of openings being an air exhaust opening and the other of said pair of openings being an air intake opening, said intake opening being ylocated adjacent said front wall and said exhaust opening being located adjacent said rear Wall, a substantially imperforate, tirst bale extending across said compartment and dividing said compartment into a working chamber and a irst plenum chamber, the top portion of said baille being disposed vertically intermediate said intake and exhaust openings and the bottom portion of said baille being disposed intermediate said front and rear walls, portions of the top and bottom of said bale being spaced respectively from said top and bottom walls to permit the passage of air from said working chamber to said plenum chamber, a second baffle mounted in said compartment and extending across the path of air which passes through said intake opening, said second baille extending at an acute angle from said yfront wall to a portion of said top Wall intermediate said intake and said exhaust openings and defining a second plenum chamber with said front, top and side walls of said compartment, said second baille having holes therein disposed to direct air from said second plenum chamber into said working chamber along paths which extend away from said front wall and towards said first baie, said front wall being formed at least in part by a panel movable along a predetermined path to close and unclose said front wall, said path of said panel being outside of the path of air moving to said intake opening and into said working chamber; the improvement which comprises a vented storage compartment, having a wall in common with one of the Vwalls of said fume hood, said common wall being provided with means establishing continuous communication therethrough and between said compartment and said working chamber exhaust opening, said exhaust opening thus serving to exhaust gases `from said fume hood working chamber and said compartment. l

3. A device according to claim 2, and further characterized by an access opening in said common wall between said fume -hood and said compartment whereby access is established between said working chamber and said compartment, and closure means operable to open and close said access opening.'

4. A device according to claim 2, and further characterized in that means are provided in said compartment establishing communication between the interior of said compartment and the atmosphere.

5. In a device of the class described including a fume hood having a rectangular cabinet formed of joined top, front, side and rear walls and adapted to be `seated on a counter or base to 'define therewith a compartment, said top wall having a pair of openings therein, one of said pair of openings being an air exhaust opening and the other of said pair of openings being an air intake opening, said intake opening being located adjacent said front wall and said exhaust opening being located adjacent said rear wall, a substantially imperforate, rst bale extending across said compartment and dividing said compartment into a working chamber and a first plenum chamber, the top portion of said 4baille being disposed vertically intermediate said intake and exhaust openings and the bottom portion of said baille being disposed intermediate said front and rear walls, portions of the top and bottom of said bale being spaced respectively from said top and bottom Walls to permit the passage of air from said working chamber to said plenum chamber, a second battle mounted in said compartment and extending across the path of air which passes through said intake opening, said second baille extending at an acute angle from said front wall to a portion of said top wall intermediate said intake and said exhaust openings and defining a second plenum chamber with said front, top and side walls of said compartment, said second baille having holes therein disposed to direct air fro-m said Seco-nd plenum chamber into said Working chamber along paths which extend away from said front Wall and towards said 'lrst battle, said front wall being formed at least in part by a panel movable along a predetermined path to close and unclose said front Wall, said path of said panel being outside of the path of air moving to said intake opening and into said working chamber; the improvement which comprises a vented storage compartment, having a wall in common with one of the walls of said fume hood, said common wal-l being provided with openings establishing 'continuous communication therethrough and between said compartment `and said working chamber exhaust opening, said exhaust opening thus serving to exhaust gases from said fume hood working chamber and said compartment and port means provided in said compartment establishing communication between the interior of the compartment and the atmosphere, said port means being greater in total area than any one of said openings in said common wall.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,349,541 Earle May 23, 1944 2,535,707 Vezey Dec. 26, 1950 2,549,042 Angermveller Apr. 17, 1951 2,627,220 Morrow Feb. 3, 1953 2,649,727 Snow Aug. 25, 1953 2,715,359 MacKintosh Aug. 16, 1955 2,819,666 McNeil Ian. 14, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2349541 *May 23, 1940May 23, 1944Genevieve M EarleCabinet structure
US2535707 *Nov 23, 1948Dec 26, 1950Gen ElectricCombined kitchen carinet and ventilating hood
US2549042 *Sep 4, 1947Apr 17, 1951Allied Chem & Dye CorpFume hood
US2627220 *Nov 4, 1950Feb 3, 1953Sheldon & Co E HFume hood
US2649727 *Jan 4, 1951Aug 25, 1953Donald L SnowChemical fume hood
US2715359 *Oct 30, 1950Aug 16, 1955Alexander D MackintoshLaboratory hood
US2819666 *Dec 14, 1955Jan 14, 1958Kirk & Blum Mfg CompanyLaboratory fume hood
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4637301 *Feb 6, 1984Jan 20, 1987Environmental Air Control, Inc.Contamination control work station
US6368206 *Apr 20, 2000Apr 9, 2002Labconco CorporationBiological safety cabinet with improved air flow
USRE40276 *Mar 15, 2004Apr 29, 2008Labconco CorporationBiological safety cabinet with improved air flow
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/57
International ClassificationB08B15/00, B08B15/02
Cooperative ClassificationB08B15/023
European ClassificationB08B15/02B