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Publication numberUS3014305 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1961
Filing dateMar 30, 1959
Priority dateMar 30, 1959
Publication numberUS 3014305 A, US 3014305A, US-A-3014305, US3014305 A, US3014305A
InventorsYurchich Frank J
Original AssigneeYurchich Frank J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arrowhead for bow fishing
US 3014305 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. J. YURCHICH 3,014,305

ARROWHEAD FOR BOW FISHING Filed March 50, 1959 Dec. 26, 1961 25 Z 29 55 /2 V, 4 2/ A 44 io rj 5 Ni u J naw/M4150); 5mm]: J.

3,014,305 ARROWHEAD FOR BOW FISHING Frank 3. Yurchich, 1024 E. Knapp St., Milwaukee, Wis.

Filed Mar. 30, 1959, Ser. No. 892,819

4 Claims. (Cl. 4 3-6) This invention relates generally to arrowheads used in shooting fish. Morespecifioally, this invention relates to an arrowhead having a retractable barb.

When shooting fish with bow and arrow, it is desirable to have an arrowhead that has means for preventing the fish from sliding off the arrow after it has been speared. In the past, most arrowheads of this type have come equipped with at least one outwardly extending barb. However, usually these barbs were set in an outwardly extending position prior to shooting the arrow. Such a construction makes it more difiicult for the arrow to penetrate the body of the fish. Furthermore, such an arrow is more likely to be deflected by the water than an arrow without the outstanding barbs, making it more difficult to hit the target.

Another problem encountered with arrowheads having barbs is the problem of withdrawing the arrow from the body of the fish. Various constructions have been proposed for solving this problem and most of them are directed to a means for inserting the barb Within a recess in the arrow housing prior to withdrawing the arrow.

The arrowhead of this invention overcomes the problems encountered with prior art arrowheads by calling for a set of outwardly extending barbs that are retained near the stem of the arrow while it is shot and until the arrow has passed through the body of the fish. At that time the barbs spread to prevent the fish from sliding off the arrowhead. The arrowhead of this-invention is provided further with a collar member retaining the barbs against the arrowhead so that it may be easily withdrawn from the body of the fish.

Therefore, it is the object of this invention to provide a new and improved arrowhead for bow fishing.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved arrowhead having barbs that retained near the body of the arrow until the arrow has passed through the body of the fish.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved arrowhead having barbs that can be retained adjacent the bow of the arrowhead so that the arrowhead may be easily withdrawn from the body of the fish.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description when read in connection with the attached drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of the arrowhead of this invention with the barbs retained against the side of the arrowhead; and

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the arrowhead of this invention in which the barbs are spread away from the shaft of the arrow.

As illustrated in the drawing, the arrowhead comprises a cylindrical hollow tube 11 having a pointed body member 12 extending longitudinally from one end thereof. The body member 12 is preferably of a solid hardened material and extends into the tube through only a portion of the length of the tube 11. The remainder of the tube 11 forms a receptacle for the forward end of an arrow shaft 14. The body member 12 is formed with a recessed portion 15 that coincides with the forward end of the tube 11. In assembly, the forward end of the tube is rolled into the recess 15 to mount the body member in the tube. Such a structure permits the heat treating of the point of the arrowhead prior to assembly.

Intermediate the ends of the tube are a pair of subretain the barbs near the shaft of the arrow.

3,014,305 Patented Dec. 26, 1961 2 stantially diametrically opposed apertures 17. The inner end of the member 12 has a projection shown as an eye 20 having a transverse hole 21 formed therein. In the preferred embodiment shown in the drawings, the distance between the recessed portion 15 of the body portion 12 and the hole 21 in the eye 20 is less than the distance between the end of the tube 11 and the op posed apertures 17 in the tube. Furthermore, the diameter of the projection 20 is considerably less than the internal diameter of said tube. In assembly the tube is moved over the arrowhead until the apertures 17 in the tube 11 are aligned with the transverse hole 21 in the eye 20. A wire 24 is then threaded through the apertures 17 and said hole 21. Then'the body member 12 is forced to move longitudinally relative to the tube 11 until the end of the tube is aligned with the recess 15 in the body member. In this position the hole 21 in the eye 20 is transversely out of line with the apertures 17. This forces the'wire 24 to take a stepped or wavelike formation within the tube causing the outer ends of the wire to spread outwardly to form barbs 25. The end of the tube is rolled into the recess to unite the body member 12 and the tube 11 and to maintain the barbs 25 in their outwardly projecting position. The wire which forms the barb is preferably spring wire so as to have a suitable amount of resilience which tends to keep the barbs in their outwardly extended position.

Suitable means are provided for retaining the free ends 26 of the barbs 25 adjacent the shaft of the arrow. As shown in the drawings, a collar 28 is slidably mounted on the shaft of the arrow for this purpose. One end of the collar 28 has a flange 29 to form with the shaft of the arrow an annular recess 30 for receiving the free ends of the barb. When the free end 26 ofthe barbs 25'are retained in the recess 30, the barbs assume a bowed position relative to the shaft and tube. To facilitate the retention of the barbs in their position adjacent the shaft, the endsi26 may be formed on an angle so that they are substantially parallel to the axis of the flange when in the bowed position. In this Way a greater portion of the barb contacts the flange on the collar, thereby insuring a firmer grip between the collar and the barb.

If desired, means may be provided to limit the axial movement of the collar 28. As shown in the drawings, a groove 34 is formed in the arrow for receiving a snap ring 33. The snap ring '33 serves to limit the axial movement of the collar relative to the shaft. As shown in the drawings, the other end 35 of the collar 28may also be enlarged to a size larger than the external diameter of the snap ring so as to more easily coact with the snap link. Although a snap ring has been shown, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that other suitable stoppers may be used with the collar.

The end of the shaft 14 is forced into. the open end of the tube and secured therein by any of the means well known in the art. As shown in the drawings, the end of the shaft is merely press fitted into the hollow tube.

When the arrow has been assembled and is ready for use, the free ends 26 of the barbs 25. are pressed inwardly toward the shaft and the flange 29 of the collar is positioned over the free ends ofthe barbs to In this position as shown in FIG. 1, the barbs are bowed relative to the longitudinal axis of the shaft and tube. Since the barbs are spring members they engage the collar with considerablev force and are retained in the bowed position due to the friction between the barbs and the collar.

To facilitate the retention of the barbs in their position adjacent the shaft, the ends 26 may be formed on an angle so that they are substantially parallel to the axis of the flange when inthe bowed position. In this way a greater portion of the barb contacts the flange on the collar, thereby insuring a firmer grip between the This is actually done by the body of the fish which engages the collar as the arrow is passing therethrough. After the arrow has passed through the body of the fish, the barbs will spring back into their outwardly projecting position such as shown in FIG. 2. In this position it is impossible for the body of the fish to slide oh the arrowhead.

When it is desired to remove the arrowhead from the body of the fish, the barbs are again forced inward toward the shaft and the collar is positioned over the ends of the barb. The entire arrow and arrowhead may then be easily retracted from the body of the fish. To facilitate removal of the arrowhead, the outer surface of the other end 35 of the collar member may be slightly tapered.

Although but one embodiment has been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made in the disclosed arrowhead without departing from the spirit of the invention or from the scope of the appended claims. I

What is claimed is:

1. An arrowhead mountable on an arrow shaft comprising a tube open at both ends, a body having one end the pointed end extending longitudinally therefrom, the other end of said tube being adapted to receive the shaft of an arrow, a wire engaging said tube and forming a pair of outwardly and rearwardly extending barbs, and tubular means adapted to be slidably mounted on the arrow shaft for retaining the ends of said barbs adjacent said shaft in such a manner that the ends of said barbs exert an outward force on said collar and the barbs bow outward intermediate their ends, whereby when passing through a body the natural inward pressure of the body on said bowed portion causes said barb to release the force on said collar so that it may slide freely.

2. An arrowhead mountable on an arrow shaft comprising a tube open at both ends and having a pair of opposed apertures intermediate the ends of said tube, a body having one end terminating in a point mounted within tube with the pointed end extending longitudinally therefrom, the other end of said body terminating in an eye portion for receiving a barb, a wire threaded through said apertures and said eye and being formed into a pair of barbs extending rearwardly and outwardly in their normal position, and tubular means adapted to be slidably mounted on the arrow shaft for retaining the ends of the barbs adjacent the shaft in a stressed condition, said barbs being bowed outwardly beyond said tube when their ends are forceably engaging said tubular retaining means, whereby when said arrow passes through a body the natural inward pressure of the body on the bowed portions of said barbs forces said barbs inward in such a manner as to release the ends of the barbs from said tubular retaining means so that said tubular retaining means can slide freely on said shaft out of engagement with said end of said barbs. V

3. The arrowhead of claim 2 in which the eye portion and said apertures are transversely out of line so that the ends of a wire threaded through the eye and said aperture extend outwardly and rearwardly of said point in their natural position.

4. An arrow comprising a shaft, a tube open at both ends, a body having one end terminating in a point mounted within said tube with the pointed end extending longitudinally therefrom, said shaft being mounted in the other end of said tube, a wire engaging said tube and having a pair of outwardly and rearwardly extending barbs, and a collar slidably mounted on said shaft for terminating in a point mounted within said tube with engaging the ends of said barbs and retaining them adjacent said shaft in such a manner that they form a bow intermediate their ends and exert an outward pressure on said collar to retard its axial movement, whereby when passing through a body the natural inward pressure of the body on the bowed portions of the barbs causes said barbs to release said collar so that it can slide freely on said shaft.

References'Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,725,656 Schmidt Dec. 6, 1955 2,904,338 Podufal Sept. 15, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 922,134 France May 30, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2725656 *Nov 26, 1954Dec 6, 1955Schmidt Richard DArrowhead or harpoon point
US2904338 *Jun 30, 1958Sep 15, 1959Universal Lubricating SystemsArrow tip
FR922134A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3164385 *Mar 12, 1962Jan 5, 1965Shure Raymond LDirectionally convertible arrow tip
US3168313 *Mar 28, 1962Feb 2, 1965Lint Lewis EHunting arrowhead with retractable barbs
US3340642 *Aug 17, 1964Sep 12, 1967Vasiljevic Tomislav PFishing spear gun with dual spear projecting means
US3579894 *Mar 24, 1969May 25, 1971Kidder Ephraim HenryFish-impaling and grappling implement
US3824748 *Feb 14, 1973Jul 23, 1974Pichowicz JPerma land bound stake device
US4099720 *Feb 23, 1976Jul 11, 1978Zeren Joseph DExpanding arrowhead
US4642929 *Feb 18, 1986Feb 17, 1987Franklin Dwaine RArchery fish point
US4742637 *Feb 24, 1987May 10, 1988John MusacchiaFishing arrowhead
US4819360 *Jul 13, 1987Apr 11, 1989Larry ThomasBowfishing arrowhead
US5046744 *Aug 13, 1990Sep 10, 1991Eddy Byron CHunting point for arrows
US5112063 *Dec 21, 1990May 12, 1992Pucketts Blood Trailers Broadhead, Inc.Tubular restraint for broadhead with deployable cutting blades
US5178398 *Sep 30, 1991Jan 12, 1993Eddy Byron CHunting broadhead for arrows
US5314196 *Aug 28, 1992May 24, 1994Ruelle Robert JArrow construction for use in bow hunting
US5553413 *Feb 4, 1993Sep 10, 1996Gannon; Gregory T.Fishing arrow and passthrough prevention devices
US6171206May 17, 1997Jan 9, 2001Liechty, Ii Victor JayArrowhead with inclined blade to impart spinning at target penetration
US6287223May 3, 1999Sep 11, 2001Liechty, Ii Victor JayDulling prevention for sharp cutting edge of blade-opening arrowhead blades when in a closed in-flight position
US6287224Apr 11, 1997Sep 11, 2001Liechty, Ii Victor JayNon-consumable blade retention for blade-opening arrowheads
US6755758Jan 6, 2001Jun 29, 2004Liechty, Ii Victor JayIndependent blade retention for blade-opening arrowheads
US6758774Sep 17, 2001Jul 6, 2004Liechty, Ii Victor JayArrowhead with recessed collar
US6887172Sep 10, 2003May 3, 2005Gregory B. ArasmithArrow broadhead
US7311621Jan 7, 2005Dec 25, 2007Kevin Michael SullivanFish-holding arrowhead
US7311622 *Nov 16, 2005Dec 25, 2007Matthew FuttereWire broadhead apparatus and method
US7485056Dec 27, 2005Feb 3, 2009Kevin Michael SullivanFish-holding arrowhead
US7571564 *Oct 19, 2007Aug 11, 2009Kevin Michael SullivanFish harvesting head
US7713152Aug 7, 2007May 11, 2010Lynn A. TentlerArrowhead with unfolding blades
US7780554Jun 1, 2007Aug 24, 2010Bear Archery, Inc.Expandable arrow broadhead for attachment to one end of an arrow shaft
US8182378Jan 11, 2010May 22, 2012Matthew FuttereCompressible cutting width broadhead apparatus and method
US8677675 *Nov 15, 2011Mar 25, 2014Christopher A. KochMulti-pronged spear-fishing spear tip
US20130118052 *Nov 15, 2011May 16, 2013Christopher A. KochMulti-pronged spear-fishing spear tip
EP2023073A1 *Aug 10, 2007Feb 11, 2009Omersub - S.p.A.Shaft head for speargun
Classifications
U.S. Classification43/6, 473/582
International ClassificationF42B6/08, F42B6/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B6/08
European ClassificationF42B6/08