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Publication numberUS3014579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1961
Filing dateJan 6, 1960
Priority dateJan 6, 1960
Publication numberUS 3014579 A, US 3014579A, US-A-3014579, US3014579 A, US3014579A
InventorsLathrop Susan E
Original AssigneeLathrop Susan E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable applicating device
US 3014579 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1961 s. E. LATHROP DISPOSABLE APPLICATING DEVICE Filed Jan. 6, 1960 nvwszvrm 3 us/w E. LA THR OP BY Arromwry United States Patent i 3,014,579 DISPOSABLE APPLICATING DEVICE Susan E. Lathrop, 478 Huntington St., Shelton, Conn. Filed Jan. 6, 1960, Ser. No. 764 1 Claim. (Cl. 206-56) This invention relates to a disposable applicating device for applying a cleaning agent or the like, and more particularly to a readily disposable device for applying a thinner for removing nail polish or the like from ones fingers or toes.

Heretofore, stale nail polish was removed simply by soaking a Wad of cotton with a suitable nail polish thinner poured from an open bottle, and applying the soaked wad to ones nail. This primitive method not only succeeded in removing the polish from ones nails, but oftentimes resulted in removing the varnish from the dressing table due to the dripping or spillage of the thinner thereon. Furthermore, the primitive use of a soaked pad rendered touch-up operations practically impossible, since it was diflicult, if not impossible, to soak and hold such a saturated wad Without getting some of the thinner on the nails which are or have been polished. Thus, the ritual of removing nail polish, performed almost daily by the great majority of women, was generally a tedious, time-consuming and messy task.

Therefore an object of this invention is to overcome the difiiculties heretofore encountered'in removing the nail polish from one finger.

Another object is to provide a novel applicator impregnated with a cleaning fluid or thinner.

Another object is to provide a readily disposable device which is convenient to use and which comprises a disposable applicator having a sponge-like core saturated with a predeterminate amount of thinner.

Another object is to provide a readily disposable applicator impregnated with a suitable thinner and which is constructed and arranged so thatsqueezing or compressing the applicator frees more or less as much of the thinner as desired.

A feature of this invention resides in the provision that the applicator is relatively simple to make and use and which is readily disposable upon use.

Another feature resides in the provision that the device is small, portable and can be easily carried in ones handbag.

Another feature resides in the provision that the disposable device for removing nail polish is relatively inexpensive, simple in construction, easy to use andpositive in operation.

The various features of novelty which characterize this invention are pointed out with particularity in the claim annexed to and forming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and specific objects attained by its use, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there is illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a section view taken through a disposable device for removing nail polish in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 2 is a detailed perspective view of the novel applicator of FIG. 1 having a portion thereof shown in section. I

FIG. 3 is a section view taken through a modified form of the invention.

FIG; 4 is a section view taken along line 4-4 of 7 H 3,014,579 Patented Dec. 26, 1961 posable cleaning device 10in accordance with this invention. While the cleaning device 10 is susceptible to many and various uses, in accordance with this invention, it is particularly applicable for removing nail polish from womens fingers and toes. As shown, the device 10 consists of a capsule containing a plurality of applicators 11. In the form illustrated by FIG. 1, two applicators are enclosed within the capsule, one for removing the bulk of the polish from a nail, and the other to function as the finisher, i.e. performing the final cleaning for the particles of polish not completely removed by the first applicator.

As shown in FIG. 2, each applicator 11 comprises a central core 12 of sponge or sponge rubber. The core 12, as shown, is substantially cubical in shape. Enwrapped about each core 12 is a wad or pad of absorbent material 13, such as cotton or the like. In accordance with this invention the core 12 is saturated with a suitable nail polish cleaning fluid or thinner. The cotton Wrap 13 provides the vehicle by which the thinner is absorbed from the core 12 and applied to ones nail. The thinner in turn dissolves the polish, which adheres to the cotton wad as it is rubbed against the nail and succeeds in removing the polish.

In accordance with this invention the wad 13 is disposed of after a nail or two has been cleaned, and another capsule resorted to to completethe hand.

To prevent evaporation of the thinner from the applicator 11 until ready for use, the applicators 11 are contained in a fluid impervious capsule or cover 14, which forms an air-tight cocoon about the applicators 11. The cover 14 may be formed of suitable metal foil or plastic. Thus the device 10 can be readily distributed, i.e. retailed, or carried about in ones handbag. As a result it is no longer necessary to resort to messy wads soaked with thinner from an open bottle. Thus the danger of spillage and dripping of the thinner over ones hand and/or on valuable pieces of furniture is completely eliminated.

In accordance with the present invention, the core 12 is impregnated with a predetermined amount of thinner during manufacture. Thus the use/r'need not concern herself with thinner bottles susceptible to spillage, soaked wads, and the general mess heretofore encountered in a nail polish removing operation.

An import-ant feature of this invention is that it greatly minimizes the time required to do ones nails and eliminates the mess heretofore encountered in a nail cleaning operation.

Another important aspect of the construction described is that the amount of thinner required to wet the nail can be controlled by simply squeezing the applicators 11 to free more or less of the thinner from the core 12. Thus flooding of the thinner to the cotton wad 13 surrounding the saturated core 12 can be controlled. This in turn makes for a neater and more satisfying job.

The use of the instant applicator is especially useful for retouching nails. This is because the applicators 11, herein described, are easy to use and better control can be had in containing the thinner to the nail to be cleaned. Thus, the instant applicator prevents thinner from comtacting the properly polished nails on either hand, and thereby minimizes any accidental removal of polish from these nails.

FIGS. 3 to 5 illustrate a modified form of the invention. In this embodiment the device 20 comprises an applicator having an elongated central core 21 of sponge or sponge rubber. The core 21 is likewise completely .enwrapped by a suitable absorbent material 22 as hereinbefore described. .In this form, one end of the applicator is used to remove the bulk of the polish, and the other end thereof is used as the finisher. In this embodiment a single applicator is encased in an air-tight capsule or cocoon 23 formed of fiuid impervious material, as herein described.

While in accordance with the provisions of the statutes there is illustrated and described herein the best form and mode of operation of the invention now known to the inventor, those skilled in the art will understand that changes may be made in the form of the apparatus disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention covered by the claim, and that certain features of the invention may sometimes be used to advantage without a corresponding use of other features.

What is claimed is:

A readily disposable throw-away applicator for removing nail polish, said applicator comprising a sponge core, a charge of cosmetic thinner saturating said core, 15 2,888,133

a wad of absorbent material enwrapped about said core whereby said wad absorbs fiuid from said saturated core, an outer fluid impervious co-ver forming an air-tight envelope for containing said applicator until readied for use, said outer cover being readily removed from said applicator so'that said applicator may be grasped and applied to the nail to be cleaned; and whereby squeezing said applicator frees the thinner from said core as desired.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,076,604 Watson Apr. 13, 1937 2,209,914 Gerber et -al July 30, 1940 Betteridge May 26, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2076604 *Mar 25, 1935Apr 13, 1937Padco IncCleaning pad
US2209914 *Feb 25, 1937Jul 30, 1940Erwin G GerberSelf-impregnating pad
US2888133 *Dec 3, 1956May 26, 1959Betteridge Harry WDisposable shoe dressing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3470590 *Aug 24, 1966Oct 7, 1969Hoff Adam FAdhesive fastener
US4938347 *Dec 23, 1988Jul 3, 1990Pkp, Inc.Disposable single digit nail polish remover pouch
US4963045 *Sep 27, 1989Oct 16, 1990The Willcox Family TrustDispenser-applicator for spreading substances
US5368157 *Oct 29, 1993Nov 29, 1994Baldwin Graphic Systems, Inc.Pre-packaged, pre-soaked cleaning system and method for making the same
US5974976 *Aug 27, 1997Nov 2, 1999Baldwin Graphic Systems, Inc.Cleaning system and process for making same employing reduced air cleaning fabric
US6035483 *Jun 7, 1995Mar 14, 2000Baldwin Graphic Systems, Inc.Cleaning system and process for making and using same employing a highly viscous solvent
US6076662 *Mar 24, 1999Jun 20, 2000Rippey CorporationPackaged sponge or porous polymeric products
US6189539 *Jul 31, 2000Feb 20, 2001Sandrell MitchellNail polish cleanup sticks having moisture-retaining package
US7014716Mar 6, 2001Mar 21, 2006Baldwin Graphic Systems Inc.Method of cleaning a cylinder of a printing press
US7069854Mar 6, 2001Jul 4, 2006Baldwin Graphic Systems Inc.Soak on site and soak on press cleaning system and method of using same
US8393337 *Feb 1, 2007Mar 12, 2013Jonathan Reed KalishNail cleaning apparatus
US8584685 *Mar 21, 2012Nov 19, 2013Katherine Rose KovarikNail polish remover method and device
US8757173Nov 13, 2013Jun 24, 2014Katherine Rose KovarikNail polish remover method and device
US8893727Apr 2, 2013Nov 25, 2014Jonathan Reed KalishNail cleaning apparatus
US8936030 *Jun 18, 2014Jan 20, 2015Katherine Rose KovarikNail polish remover method and device
US9010340 *Sep 30, 2014Apr 21, 2015Katherine Rose KovarikNail polish remover method and device
US9420867Mar 4, 2014Aug 23, 2016Jonathan Reed KalishHand cleaning device
US20010008103 *Mar 6, 2001Jul 19, 2001Gasparrini C. RobertSoak on site and soak on press cleaning system and method of using same
US20010045218 *Mar 6, 2001Nov 29, 2001Gasparrini C. RobertSoak on site and soak on press cleaning system and method of using same
US20030127104 *Dec 30, 2002Jul 10, 2003Tyre Sharon E.Nail polish removal system
US20070175490 *Feb 1, 2007Aug 2, 2007Jonathan Reed KalishNail cleaning apparatus
US20120240951 *Mar 21, 2012Sep 27, 2012Katherine Rose KovarikNail Polish Remover Method and Device
US20140290683 *Jun 18, 2014Oct 2, 2014Katherine Rose KovarikNail Polish Remover Method and Device
US20150034115 *Sep 30, 2014Feb 5, 2015Katherine Rose KovarikNail Polish Remover Method and Device
USRE35976 *Aug 28, 1996Dec 1, 1998Baldwin Graphic Systems, Inc.Pre-packaged, pre-soaked cleaning system and method for making the same
EP0741034A2Dec 29, 1995Nov 6, 1996Baldwin Graphic Systems, IncCleaning system and process for making same employing reduced air cleaning fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/196, 132/73, 206/209
International ClassificationA45D29/00, A45D34/04
Cooperative ClassificationA45D34/04, A45D2200/1018, A45D2200/1036, A45D29/007
European ClassificationA45D34/04, A45D29/00R