Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3014667 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1961
Filing dateJun 21, 1961
Priority dateJun 21, 1961
Publication numberUS 3014667 A, US 3014667A, US-A-3014667, US3014667 A, US3014667A
InventorsJames Fraser, Mclean Edward S
Original AssigneeSpeakman Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerator with flow control device
US 3014667 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1961 s. McLEAN ETAL 3,014,667

AERATOR WITH FLOW CONTROL DEVICE Filed June 21, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.4.

INVENTORS 2a Edward S. McLean 8s F|G.6. James Fras er dMfM ATTORNEYS Dec. 26, 1961 E. S. MCLEAN ET AL AERATOR WITH FLOW CONTROL DEVICE Filed June 21, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG IO. INVENTORS Edward S. McLean a James Fmse? ZQM /W 313M ATTORNEYS 3,014 667 AEnAToR wrrn FLovv CONTROL DEVICE Edward S. McLean and James Fraser, Wihnington, Deh, assignors to Speakman Company, Wilmington, Dei. Filed June 21, 196i, Ser. No. 138,648 Claims. (Cl. 239-427) This invention relates to fiuid mixing devices, and more in particular to an improved combination of a liquid discharge device, an aerator, and a flow control device, and to a method of assembling the same. This application is a continuation in-part of prior application Serial No. 35,224, filed June 10, 1960, which was a continuation-inpart of prior application Serial No. 611,111, filed September 21, 1956, now abandoned, and is also a continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 82,132, filed January 11, 1961, which was a continuation-in-part of Serial No. 807,381, filed April 20, 1959, now abandoned.

Heretofore, it has been the practice to assemble aerating devices on the discharge or spout end of the water outlet by means of threads on the outlet'and on the aerator, or by means of a rubber connector. These devices thus assembled in this manner are subject .to theft, as the aerator may readily be removed by unscrewing. This is particularly true in public places and in sales rooms or other places of display, where an aerator forms a part of a device being demonstrated. These aerators usually contain one or more screens in the discharge end thereof, a perforated plate in the other end thereof, and have air vents between the screens and the plate. When the screens become clogged with sediment, or other materials carried by the water flow, the water has the objectionable tendency to be discharged through the air vents in a plane at right angles to the axis of the aerator.

It is an object of the present invention to produce a combination water outlet device and an aerator, which will always allow the water to flow in the normal discharge path,

It is a further object of this invention to produce a combination water discharge device and an aerator wherein the aerator can .only be easily removed from the discharge device by special tools.

A still further object of this invention is to produce a combination water discharge device and an aerator wherein the aerator may not be readily removed therefrom by unauthorized persons.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an aerator that will always deliver the same volume of water regardless of the pressure in the supply line.

The water supply means for a sink or wash basin customarily includes a spigot or faucet, of the usual type wherein the water flow is controlled by a valve means. In order to prevent splashing and to give a soft flow of water, aerator devices are attached to-this spigot, usually being screwed on the nozzle end thereof, and having the aerator device exposed, or the aerator device is built into the discharge device with the air inlet ports in the conduit, prior to the point of discharge of the water.

The use of the present invention permits the user to insert the aerator .within the faucet in sucha manner that it may be only-removed with special tools. The air intake ports are covered by the conduit walls of the faucet. This will control the discharge of the water through the air ports if the mixing screens become clogged.

In many installations excessive water line pressures cause the use of undesirable quantities of water. It has therefore been found necessary to combine with the aerator a flow control device.

The various features of novelty which characterize this invention are pointed out with particularity-in theclairns annexed to and forming part of this specification. For a better understanding of the-special objects obtained by surface of the spout 29 and the outer surface of the Efiiifih? Patented Dec. 26, 1961 its use, reference should be had to the drawings and descriptive matter, in which is illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of this invention.

Of the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a top view of the discharge device.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the same.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the same.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the special tools .used to insert the aerator.

FIG. 6 is .a second modification, showing the aerator in another type of discharge device.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a deck sink fixture partially broken away to show the mounting of the flow control unit in the valve.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a deck sink fixture, partially broken away to show the mounting of the flow control unit in the nozzle.

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view of the end of the nozzle shown in FIG. 7 with a flow control device mounted therein in conjunction with an aerator.

FIG. 10 is a bottom view of the device shown in FIG; 9.

In the preferred embodiment of this invention water is admitted under pressure to the chamber 141, FIG. 3, by means of the conduit (not shown), connected to the faucet or spigot housing 11 by means of the threads 12. The pressure of the water is controlled by means of a valve or valves (not shown). This water flows from the pressure chamber lu through the opening 13, and through the larger holes in perforated plate 14 and then through the small holes in plate 15 into the mixing chamber '16. The force of the water entering in jets through the perforated plates 15, causes the air to flow through the air ports 17 into this mixing chamber. The air and the'water are discharged through the screens 18 and leave the miX- ing chamber through the discharge port -1. The aerator including the perforated plates and the mixing screens 18, is included within the housing 20, which forms the aerator body. This body has a male thread 21 on the upper end thereof which is received by the female thread on the interior surface of the walls 22 of the discharge device, and is held against the inner surface of the rib surrounding the opening 13. The aeratorhousingltl has the slots 23, 23, cut in the bottom thereof on alternate sides, to receive the special tool, shown as 24, in FIG. 5. This tool fits within the slots 23 and allows the rotation of the aerator housing, so that the thread 21 in the ends thereof may be tightened and may only .be removed by means of this tool. I Y

A second modification of the tool, is shown in FIG; 5. This tool 26 has a serrated and-conical end 27 which is forced against the inner surface of the housing Ztl'of 1 the aerator and grips-the sides thereof to allow the tightening of the threads. When this type tool is used no slots23, '23 are necessary (asshown in FIG. 6), and the aerator may be inserted or removed only by means of this special tool.

A third modification of the tool is shown in FIG. :5.

This is tool 25 and comprises a plate having two upstanding portions thereon that lit within drilled holes in the lower surface of .the aerator to allow tightening o the same.

The aerator shown in FIGURES .1 to 4 has an air passage 28 between the outside wallsof the aerator body and the extension 29 of the walls 22, forming a hollow spout. This spout 29 is of such'length that it covers the air ports or openings 17 and it is of such diameter that it will-leave the air passage LES-between the -inner cylindrical housing Ziiofthe aerator. This wall member is of such a length as to cover the lower surface of the discharge port 19 of the aerator, as shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings.

Another application of this invention is to the usual type of water discharge device used in kitchen sinks that may be shifted in position over the sink. The aerator housing 20 is partially enclosed within the extension 29 of the conduit walls 22, allowing the air passage 28 between the aerator and the inner surface of the extension 29 of the walls.

The combination of a deck sink fixture faucet and a flow control device may be of either one or two types. The flow control device can be mounted in the conduit ahead of the valve structure, as shown in FIG. 7, wherein the yielding apertured disk type flow control device assembly 43 is mounted in the conduit 44 with a strainer 45 mounted thereunder. The flow of water is initiated and terminated in the conduit 44 by means of the valve assembly 46 which is manually controlled by the handle 47.

When it is desired to either clean or replace the flow control device, the water supply hexagonal coupling nut 5411 can be disconnected and the strainer 45 and flow control device can be removed. A similar flow control "device may be mounted in a hot water conduit 49 shown in FIG. 7. This will then control the flow of water from the conduits 44 and 49 into the mixing chamber 50 and into the nozzle 51. That is, it will be impossible regardless of the pressure in the conduits 44 and 49 to obtain more than a predetermined flow of water from the nozzle 51.

A second method of installation of flow control devices in the deck sink fixture is shown in FIG. 8, wherein the fixture has the usual valve 52 in the cold water inlet 53. A similar valve arrangement controls the flow of hot water into the fixture from the hot water inlet 54. The maximum volume of water that may be obtained from the nozzle 55, regardless of the setting of the valves 52 in the cold water inlet and the valve (not shown), which controls the flow of water in the hot water conduit 54 is controlled by a disk type flow control regulator assembly 56, shown in the end of the nozzle 55 between the conduit 57 therein and the aerator 58 mounted at the end of the nozzle. This flow control device is mounted by means of the cap screw 59 in the end of the nozzle and is retained in position by means of this cap screw. When it is desired to inspect or replace this device, the cap screw 59 is removed and the flow control regulator 56 may be removed therefrom.

Still another type of flow control device is shown in FIGS. 9 and wherein the nozzle 81 has the unit 82 retained in the open end thereof by means of the screw 83 in the upper portion of the unit and in the side walls of the nozzle 81, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. The flow control unit 84 is mounted on top of the aerator unit 82 and forms therewith an assemblage. The flow control unit 84 comprises a body portion 85 having a central conduit 86 therein and a seat 87 on the upper side thereof. This seat has depressions 88, 88 on each side thereof and a yieldable unit 89 on the top thereof resting on the seat and allowing the water to flow through the depressions 88, 88 into the central conduit 86. As the pressure increases within the nozzle 81 the rubber unit 89 is forced downwardly into the depressions 88, 88 and restricts the available opening for the flow of Water 7 therethrough, and thereby maintains a constant discharge from the nozzle 81 over a wide variation of pressure within the nozzle 81. These units may be removed by removing the aerator 82 and the flow control unit 84 mounted on the top thereof.

When using a combination aerator and flow control .device it is necessary to have a discharge of water within the range of 1 gal. per minute to 1% gal. per minute as a minimum amount in water to have the aerator function. As described above the aerator is mounted in the nozzle of the faucet and the flow control device may be mounted as a unit with the aerator as shown in FIG. 9, or inserted just above the aerator, as shown in FIG. 8, or may be inserted in the conduit leading to the discharge nozzle.

While in accordance with the provisions of the statute, the best forms of embodiment of this invention now known, have been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes may be made in the forms of the apparatus disclosed, without departing from the spirit of this invention, as set forth in the appended claims; and in some cases certain features of this invention may be used to advantage without a corresponding use of other features.

What is claimed is:

1. A water aerating spigot comprising a one piece, rigid, imperforate, hollow spout having an inlet for water at one end and an outlet for aerated water at the other end, said spout having an inwardly projecting rib between said ends, a one piece, rigid, open-ended, cylindrical housing disposed substantially completely within said outlet, spaced from the inner side surface of the spout attached near its inner end to said rib, having openings in its side wall near its inner end, and having an inwardly extending flange at its outer end, and means in said housing for mixing air with water flowing through said spout, said means including a wall disposed transversely of the spout and provided with a plurality of openings for water to pass through, and side wall means provided with openings adjacent to said transverse wall, and at least one screen in said member, said housing and rib engaging and serving to clamp said air and water mixing means in assembled position in the spout.

2. A water aerating spigot comprising a one piece, rigid, imperforate, hollow spout having an inlet for water at one end and an outlet for aerated water at the other end, said spout having an inwardly projecting lib between said ends, a one piece, rigid, open-ended, cylindrical housing disposed substantially completely within said outlet, spaced from the inner side surface of the spout attached near its inner end to said rib, having openings in its side wall near its inner end, and having an inwardly extending flange at its outer end, and means in said housing for mixing air with water flowing through said spout, said means including a wall disposed transversely of the spout and provided with a plurality of openings for water to pass through, and side wall means provided with openings adjacent to said transverse wall, and at least one screen in said member, said housing and rib engaging and serving to clamp said air and Water mixing means in assembled position in the spout, said hollow spout having a yielding apertured disk type automatic flow control device mounted therein.

3. A water aerating spigot comprising a one piece, rigid, imperforate, hollow spout having an inlet for water at one end and an outlet for aerated water at the other end, said spout having an inwardly projecting rib between said ends, a one piece, rigid, open-ended, cylindrical housing disposed substantially completely within said outlet, spaced from the inner side surface of the spout attached near its inner end to said rib, having openings in its side wall near its inner end, and having an inwardly extending flange at its outer end, and means in said housing for mixing air with water flowing through said spout, said means including a wall disposed transversely of the spout and provided with a plurality of openings for water to pass through, and side wall means provided with openings adjacent to said transverse wall, and at least one screen in said member, said housing and rib engaging and serving to clamp said air and water mixing means in assembled position in the spout, said cylindrical housing having a yielding apertured disk type automatic flow control device mounted on the top thereof.

4. A water aerating spigot comprising a one piece, rigid, imperforate, hollow spout having a portion at one end to be attached to a wall and provided with a water inlet, said spout having an outlet chamber at its other end and an inwardly projecting rib between said portion and said chamber, a one piece, rigid, open-ended, cy1indrical housing disposed substantially completely within said outlet chamber, spaced from the inner side surface of the spout, having screw-threaded connection near its inner end to said rib, having openings in its side wall near its inner end, and having an inwardly extending flange at its outer end, and means in said housing for mixing air with water flowing through said spout, said means including a member having a wall disposed transversely of said spout and adjacent to said rib and provided with a plurality of openings for water to pass through, and side wall means provided with openings adjacent thereto, and screens within the housing, said housing engaging and serving to clamp the member and screens together between said flange and rib.

5. A water aerating spigot comprising a one piece, rigid, imperforate, hollow spout having a portion at one end to be attached to a wall and provided with a water inlet, said spout having an outlet chamber at its other end and an inwardly projecting rib between said portion and said chamber, a one-piece, rigid, open-ended, cylindrical housing disposed substantially completely within said outlet chamber, spaced from the inner side surface of the spout, having screw-threaded connection near its inner end to said rib, having openings in its side wall near its inner end, and having an inwardly extending flange at its outer end, and means in said housing for mixing air with water flowing through said spout, said means including a member having a Wall disposed transversely of said spout and adjacent to said rib and provided with a plurality of openings for water to pass through, and side wall means provided with openings adjacent thereto, and screens Within the housing, said housing engaging and Serving to clamp the member and screens together between said flange and rib, said cylindrical housing having a'yieldable,

apertured disk type, automatic, flow control device mounted on the top thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2316135 *Jan 29, 1942Apr 6, 1943Crane CoShower head
US2633343 *Dec 2, 1948Mar 31, 1953Elie P AghnidesGas and liquid mixing device
US2849217 *Aug 13, 1954Aug 26, 1958Chicago Specialty Mfg CoAerators
US2888209 *Nov 21, 1955May 26, 1959Crane CoAerator
US2948300 *Apr 23, 1958Aug 9, 1960Speakman CoFlow control unit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3270964 *Jan 31, 1962Sep 6, 1966Aghnides Elie PMolded water aerators
US3298614 *May 17, 1965Jan 17, 1967Aghnides Elie PMolded water aerators
US3488005 *Aug 7, 1967Jan 6, 1970Baker Clarence PBurner nozzles
US4000857 *Jun 30, 1975Jan 4, 1977Moen Alfred MFlow control aerator
US4336908 *Jul 31, 1980Jun 29, 1982Vikre Merle AIrrigation system and volume control valve therefor
US4350300 *Apr 24, 1980Sep 21, 1982Vikre Merle AIrrigation system and constant volume sprinkler head therefor
US4356972 *Oct 20, 1980Nov 2, 1982Vikre Merle AIrrigation system and constant volume sprinkler head therefor
US4534513 *Jan 13, 1983Aug 13, 1985Aghnides Elie PConcealed aerator
US4534514 *Sep 15, 1983Aug 13, 1985Aghnides Elie PConcealed aerator which seals against a spout when inserted therein
US6971591Oct 16, 2002Dec 6, 2005Kohler Co.Tamper-resistant flow modifier assembly
US7111875 *Nov 1, 2004Sep 26, 2006Wcm Industries, Inc.Wall hydrant with slip clutch assembly
US7730901Aug 9, 2007Jun 8, 2010Wcm Industries, Inc.Hydrant roof mount
US7971609 *Feb 7, 2005Jul 5, 2011Jvl Engineering Pte Ltd.Water saving device
US8474476Mar 15, 2011Jul 2, 2013Wcm Industries, Inc.Sanitary hydrant
US8708252Nov 28, 2011Apr 29, 2014Neoperl GmbhSanitary installation part
US8740112Nov 28, 2011Jun 3, 2014Neoperl GmbhSanitary functional unit
US8955538Jul 2, 2013Feb 17, 2015Wcm Industries, Inc.Sanitary hydrant
US9038927Sep 27, 2010May 26, 2015Neoperl GmbhPlumbing spout device
US9151026 *Feb 28, 2006Oct 6, 2015Neoperl GmbhSanitary outlet fitting with vandal-proof outlet nozzle recessed in the accommodating opening of the fitting
US9228327Feb 17, 2015Jan 5, 2016Wcm Industries, Inc.Sanitary hydrant
US9303393 *Mar 13, 2014Apr 5, 2016Sdb Ip Holdings, LlcDouble-acting tamper-resistant aerator and aerator system
US9388557Jan 31, 2014Jul 12, 2016Neoperl GmbhSanitary installation part
US9580893Jun 13, 2016Feb 28, 2017Neoperl GmbhSanitary installation part
US9593471Jan 5, 2016Mar 14, 2017Wcm Industries, Inc.Sanitary hydrant
US20060108804 *Nov 1, 2004May 25, 2006Wcm Industries, Inc.Wall hydrant with slip clutch assembly
US20070176024 *Feb 18, 2005Aug 2, 2007Oliver DenzlerPlumbing spout device
US20080099094 *Feb 7, 2005May 1, 2008Jvl Engineering Pte LtdWater Saving Device
US20090007977 *Feb 28, 2006Jan 8, 2009Neoperl GmbhSanitary Outlet Fitting With Vandal-Proof Outlet Nozzle Recessed in the Accommodating Opening of the Fitting
US20110073204 *Sep 27, 2010Mar 31, 2011Neoperl GmbhPlumbing spout device
US20110284661 *May 18, 2010Nov 24, 2011Chang Chin-MiaoWater saving device
US20140263753 *Mar 13, 2014Sep 18, 2014Sdb Ip Holdings, LlcDouble-Acting Tamper-Resistant Aerator and Aerator System
US20160153181 *Feb 4, 2016Jun 2, 2016Sdb Ip Holdings, LlcDouble-Acting Tamper-Resistant Aerator and Aerator System
DE102010048701A1Oct 19, 2010Mar 29, 2012Neoperl GmbhEmbedded component, has ventilation duct installed in partial region of embedded shell body toward one side of embedded shell body, where multiple ventilation openings are formed on embedded shell body
DE102010048702A1Oct 19, 2010Mar 29, 2012Neoperl GmbhSanitary function unit, has shell whose end face is provided with gap opposite to longitudinal slot, and shell body rotating in water outlet of water valve, where end face of shell is rotationally supported on shell body
DE202010014392U1Oct 19, 2010Jan 4, 2012Neoperl GmbhSanitäre Funktionseinheit
DE202010014393U1Oct 19, 2010Jan 2, 2012Neoperl GmbhSanitäres Einbauteil
EP2597213A1Nov 25, 2011May 29, 2013Neoperl GmbHSanitary built-in part
EP2597214A1Nov 25, 2011May 29, 2013Neoperl GmbHBathroom function unit
EP2743410A2Nov 25, 2011Jun 18, 2014Neoperl GmbHSanitary built-in part
EP2915927A2Nov 25, 2011Sep 9, 2015Neoperl GmbHJet regulator
EP2930277A1Nov 25, 2011Oct 14, 2015Neoperl GmbHBathroom function unit
WO1983001266A1 *Oct 2, 1981Apr 14, 1983Aghnides, Elie, P.Concealed, liquid flow aerator
WO2006094680A1 *Feb 28, 2006Sep 14, 2006Neoperl GmbhSanitary outlet fitting with vandal-proof outlet nozzle recessed in the accommodating opening of the fitting
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/428.5, 239/533.13, 239/590.3, D23/213, 285/39, 239/452
International ClassificationE03C1/02, B05B1/30, G05D7/01, G05D7/00, E03C1/084
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/084, G05D7/012, B05B1/3006
European ClassificationE03C1/084, G05D7/01B4, B05B1/30A