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Publication numberUS3018075 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1962
Filing dateSep 8, 1958
Priority dateSep 8, 1958
Publication numberUS 3018075 A, US 3018075A, US-A-3018075, US3018075 A, US3018075A
InventorsJames C Bowers
Original AssigneeJames C Bowers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Kite frame assembly
US 3018075 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 23, 1962 J. c. BOWERS 3,018,075

KITE FRAME ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 8, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.6. FIG]. FIG-.8.

INVENTOR. JAMES c. BOWEJRS ATTORNEYS Jan. 23, 1962 J. c. BOWERS 3,018,0'75

KITE FRAME ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 8, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. JAMES C. BOWERS ATTORNEYS United Smtes Patent 3,018,075 KITE FRAME AfifiEMBLY James C. Bowers, 1506 E. Kiowa St., fiolorado Springs, Colo. Filed Sept. 8, 1953, Ser. No. 759,467 3 Claims. (til. 244-153) This invention relates to kites and more particularly rel-ates to kite frame assemblies for constructing different types and sizes of kites which may be flown without a bridle or a tail.

It is an important object of the invention to provide an easily dismountable kite frame assembly, forming, when assembled, a bridleless and tailless kite.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a kite frame assembly for producing a variety of bridleless and tailless kites.

It is still another object of the invention to provide a kite frame which may be formed in various shapes for the construction of different types and shapes of kites.

It is still further object of the invention to provide a kite frame assembly in which lateral frame supports are set at a predetermined dihedral angle which eliminates the use of a kite bow string.

It is another object of the invention to provide a kite frame assembly which has a built-in bridle stick eliminating the use of a string bridle.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a kite frame assembly in which the various types of balanced kites may be readily assembled thereby eliminating the use of a tail.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention may be readily ascertained by referring to the following description aud appended illustrations in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a kite frame base member according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the base member illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top plane view of a modified base member according to the invention;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of another modified base member of a kite frame assembly according to the invention;

FIG. 6 is a top plane view of the base member illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a top plane view of one form of bridleless and tailless kite made with the assembly according to the invention;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the kite of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a top plane view of a modified kite utilizing the frame assembly according to the invention;

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of the kite structure of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is another modified kite made with the frame assembly of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of the kite of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a further modified kite made with the kite frame assembly according to the invention; and,

FIG. 14 is another kite assembly utilizing the kite frame according to the invention.

The kite assembly of the invention includes a center block having two series of holes therein from which kite sticks may extend for holding the kite cover or skin. By providing one set of holes with their axes at an angle to the other set of holes, the correct dihedral angle of the kite lateral supports may be automatically installed in any type or shaped kite desired. Using such a block with a plurality of holes and several lengths of sticks, various types and shapes of kites can be easily made according to the imagination of the user by the addition or different placement of various sticks.

Generally, it is preferable to have a main kite spar which is along the plane of symmetry through the kite, with the remainder of the spars of the kite extending outwardly at an angle. This provides a balanced kite. Also, the main spar is preferably in a single plane and parallel to a plane through the block.

The kite block or base member, illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, comprises in a preferred form a circular block 1 having two sets of holes 2 and 3 in its periphery. The base member is shown as a portion of a cylinder with a thickness sufficient to accommodate two sets of holes 2 and 3 peripherally of the block. It is obvious, however, that where the lesser number of holes is desired, the thickness of the block may be decreased and the two sets of holes combined in a single plane. In either event, the two series of holes are maintained in close proximity to each other so that they extend from generally the same plane in the block. This arrangement permits the sticks to extend generally from the same plane for a smoothly stretched skin. In one preferred form the block is made of light plastic. The plastic is easily molded in shape or from blocks the circular shape is easily cut and the holes bored. Other light materials such as wood, light metal and the like may be utilized for the center block, in all cases, however, the weight must be maintained sulficiently low to permit flying the various types of kites which may be made with the block.

The one set of holes 2 are extended into the block generally parallel to a plane through the block and they extend outwardly, radiating from a central point in the block. The set of holes 3 are extended outwardly at an angle a to the plane passing through the axes of the holes 2. The holes 3 radiate outwardly from substantially the same central point as the radiation from holes 2. The angle or provides a dihedral angle for the kite, that is, the angle at which the cover extends outwardly from the main spar to provide an airfoil surface for the flying kite. The holes illustrated in the block are circular holes, however, the round configuration is not critical as they may be square, rectangular, oblong or any substantial shape to accommodate the shape of the particular sticks being used. Thus, the sticks may be square, rectangular, round or the like or may have a different shaped end for insertion into the holes. It is preferable, however, that the holes be uniform in size and shape so that the sticks may be interchangeable for the construction of various types and shapes of kites depending upon the placement of the sticks.

A central passage 5 through the middle of the block provides an additional hole for various constructions. A boss 6 is secured to one side of the block and a hole 7 is extended therein. Preferably the hole is substantially the same size as the holes in the other block, and it extends substantially parallel to the plane through the axes of the holes 2. A short stick may be used as the bridle of the kite inserted into the hole 7, as explained below.

A modified block illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 includes a main or base member it} having a series of holes 11 extending around the circular block adjacent one edge thereof, and a second series of holes 12 extending circumferentially around the block at the opposite edge thereof. The holes 12 are slanted inwardly in the manner similar to holes 3 in block 1. In this modification a central boss 14 secured on one edge of the fiat cylinder has a hole 15 drilled therethrough and extending through the block to provide means for the mounting of a stick perpendicular to the sticks inserted in holes 11 and 12.. A bridle piece 16 extending outwardly from the boss 14 is substantially parallel with the axes of holes 11. A series of notches 17 are provided on the bridle stick for the placement and holding of the kite string, as explained below.

One form of kite made with the block of FIGS. 3 and 4 is illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, wherein the block 10 has a short main spar inserted on one side thereof in one hole 11 in position to extend substantially parallel and aligned with the bridle piece 16. A long main spar 21 is mounted in the block in the side opposite the short spar member 20, in substantially the same plane. Two lateral spars 23 are mounted in the block 10 and extended outwardly therefrom at substantially 90 to the main spars. The spars 23 are placed in holes in the 12 series so that they extend outwardly at a predetermined dihedral angle from the plane passing through the main spars 20 and 21. As shown in the FIG. 8, the main spars extend rearwardly of the spars 2t and 21, and with a cover mounted on the kite, two airfoils joined at the main spar extend rearwardly. A string 24 is extended around the tips of all the spars, as is common practice, and the cover 25 is secured to the string by folding back an edge and gluing or otherwise securing the same around the string, which is common practice in the manufacture of kites. Also, the cover is cutout at each intersection of spar and string, as is common practice. A kite string 26 is tied to the bridle stick 16 in one of the grooves 17 depending on the particular kite and the wind in which the kite is being flown.

With the arrangement of the kite illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, the kite is balanced and will fly even in very heavy winds tailless and, obviously, bridleless. The bridle stick 16 is arranged to compensate for variations of weight and permit the kite to be balanced for flying in substantially any wind condition. It is also noted that since the spars 23 extend backwardly at the correct dihedral angle no bow string is required to bow the laterals. Furthermore, since the spars 23 are not bent by a bow string, a flat surface is provided on the kite cover which aids the stability of the kite and improves the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil sides which provide the lift for the kite.

Similar results are achieved with the center block of FIGS. 1 and 2, the main difference being that a bridle tick must be added. This is readily accomplished by inserting a short stick in the boss 6. In certain types of kites, a long bridle stick may be necessary, and this modification permits interchangeable sticks as necessary.

A simplified center block is illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 where a rectangular block 30 is provided with two lateral holes 31, and a central hole 32. The lateral holes 31 are placed at an angle to a plane passing perpendicularly through the block so that spars inserted into the holes extend at the correct dihedral angle at. These holes correspond to the series 3 of FIG. 1 and series 12 of FIG. 4. The hole 32 provides means for the insertion of a single main spar or a pair of spars which are conjointly mounted in the block to provide the main spar. A small hole 33 in the edge of the block provides means for attaching the kite string in place of a bridle normally used on such a kite. By providing correct lengths for the spars, the string attachment to the block is all that is necessary, thus dispensing with the usual bridle.

Additional types of kites may be made, as for example, the dust pan type of FIGS. 9 and 10 wherein the central block 10 supports eight sticks or spars forming the kite. In this instance, the main spars and 41 are inserted into the block and extended oppositely therefrom and in the same plane. Lateral spars 42, 42 are mounted in the block 10 and extend outwardly at substantially right angles to the spars 40, 41 and these laterals are inserted in the angled holes 12 of the center blocks so they extend at a dihedral angle from the main spars. The X spars are formed by inserting upper short spar members 43 into the center block in the angled holes 12 between the spars 40 and 42. Longer spar members 44 are placed in the block, also, at an angle between the main spar and laterals. Thus when a cover or skin 45 is mounted on a peripheral string 46 extended around the ends of the spars, the two main surface areas are at an angle to each other and extend outwardly from the main spar at a correct predetermineddihedral angle. A string 26 attached to the bridle rod 16 provides means for flying the kite. Since the laterals are placed at the correct dihedral angle and the kite is balanced, no tail is required for the flying of the kite and the bridle rod 16 replaces a normal string bridle. In this case the main spar provides stability and good flying characteristics.

A difierent type of kite i illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12 wherein short main spar 47 is inserted into the block 10 opposite of a long main spar 48 in the series of holes 11 so that the main spar is in a single plane. An X spar consisting of two upper spar members 49 and two lower members 50 are extended in an X pattern from the block and inserted in the series 12 holes. These spars extend rearwardly at a dihedral angle to the main spars. By adjusting the length of the lower spar member 48, the kite may be made square, rectangular, or in a shield shape. With the dihedral angle of the X spars and the particular frame, the kite flies very well in mild to heavy winds without a tail and with the point of the kite downwardly. In very heavy winds, a stabilizer 53 may be extended across the point to prevent the skin from arching too sharply from the spar 48.

A still different type of kite is illustrated in FIG. 13, which may be called an angel kite. In this case the block 10 has eight spars inserted in the series of holes and variously spaced therearound. In this case four pieces of covering are used, as illustrated, to form the angel kite. An upper central fiat portion 65 is formed by inserting two short spars into the holes 11, and a lower flat portion 66 is formed by inserting two longer spars 61 in the center block oppositely thereof and in the same plane. The width of the panels may be variously adjusted to accommodate the type or shape desired. Two additional upper spars 62 are placed in the series of holes 12 at an angle to the spars 60, while two additional longer spars 63 are oppositely placed on the lower side of the block 10 in the series 12 which are at an angle to the lower spars 61. With the spars 60, 61, 62 and 63 in place, a peripheral string 64 is placed around the outside of the spars in the customary manner. The upper skin panel 65 is secured around the spars 60 and over the string 64 between the two spars forming the upper flat portion, while the lower skin panel 66 is formed by placing a cover around the snars 61 and the string connecting the spar ends. The ng panels 67 and 68 are formed by placing the cover around the spars 62, 63 and the string joining the ends thereof in the normal manner. The panels 67 and 68 extend rearwardly at a predetermined dihedral angle so that when a string is attached to the bridle rod 16 the kite may be readily flown without a tail and without a string bridle.

A further type of kite utilizing a different principal is illustrated in FIG. 14, where a central block 10 has a main spar consisting of two equal length spars 70 extending from the block from the series of holes 11 oppositely and in substantially the same plane. Two lateral main spars 71 are extended from the block 10 at substantially from the main spars 70, but placed in the slanting holes 12 so that the lateral spars 71 extend rearwardly at a dihedral angle. Stabilizing spars 72 are inserted into the angle holes 12 in the block substantially half between each of the main spars 70 and the lateral 71 or at substantially a 45 angle thereto. The stabilizing spars 72 are short, approximately half the length of the main spars 70 and 71. These spars are set in the angled holes 12. A cover or skin 73 is secured to a peripheral string 74 which is secured to the tip of each of the spar members. The kite is, thus, in the form of a star. The cover is placed in position in the normal manner by folding the edges back and gluing them over the string. The kite due to its weight and balance is easily flown by mounting a string on the bridle rod 16.

While the invention has been illustrated by reference 5 to various shapes and types of kites, it is obvious that the number of types is infinite, depending on imagination and the availability of the spars. The spirit and scope of the invention is not intended to be limited to the precise details set forth in the specific examples, except as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A frame assembly for making a plurality of different types of kites comprising a cylindrical base member having a plurality of series of stick-engageable holes peripherally in said base, said holes being arranged in generally two closely spaced series peripherally around the base, the first series of holes having their axes generally parallel with a plane and radiating outwardly from a central point in the base, the second series of holes having their axes at a slight, predetermined angle to the said plane, a plurality of sticks mounted in a predetermined group of holes in the first series, a second plurality of sticks mounted in a selected group of the second series of holes, a cover mounted on the two selected groups forming two flat planing surfaces one on each side of a main spar composed of the sticks of the first group, and the sticks of the second group arranged to support said cover forming said planing surfaces at a 25 predetermined dihedral to the sticks of the first group forming said main spar.

2. A frame assembly according to claim 1 in which the holes of both series are uniformly spaced around the periphery of the base member.

3. A frame assembly according to claim 1 in which the axis of corresponding holes of the first series and the axis of corresponding holes of the second series are in the same plane as the axis of the cylindrical base member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 23,034 Schroeder Aug. 31, 1948 176,721 Whitcomb Apr. 25, 1876 646,375 Eddy Mar. 27, 1900 824,616 Bergeron June 26, 1906 967,612 Clawson Aug. 16, 1910 1,014,369 Buengers Jan. 9, 1912 1,456,260 Trombley May 22, 1923 2,097,538 Taylor Nov. 2, 1937 2,709,318 Benjamin May 31, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 6,657 Great Britain 1914

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US176721 *Mar 18, 1876Apr 25, 1876 Improvement in folding kites
US646375 *Aug 1, 1898Mar 27, 1900William A EddyKite.
US824616 *Oct 13, 1905Jun 26, 1906Alfred Jacques BergeronTailless kite which can be taken to pieces.
US967612 *Oct 11, 1909Aug 16, 1910Clement C ClawsonKite.
US1014369 *Jun 26, 1911Jan 9, 1912John P BuengersKite.
US1456260 *May 26, 1921May 22, 1923Russell A TrombleyCollapsible kite
US2097538 *Feb 21, 1936Nov 2, 1937Paul K GuillowKite
US2709318 *Nov 24, 1952May 31, 1955W R Benjamin CoToy construction elements
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GB191406657A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3194520 *Oct 5, 1962Jul 13, 1965Daniel C KurkjianKite
US3327975 *Mar 26, 1965Jun 27, 1967William J VaughanKite frame
US3347500 *Jun 30, 1966Oct 17, 1967Alfred E HartigKite
US3801052 *Oct 30, 1972Apr 2, 1974A QuercettiSailplane
US3954235 *Aug 21, 1974May 4, 1976Peter Trevor PowellKites
US4029273 *Nov 13, 1975Jun 14, 1977Christoffel Jr Julius MKite
US5938150 *Jul 18, 1997Aug 17, 1999King; Randy J.Kite with an adjustable airfoil and removable surface
US6598833Mar 12, 2002Jul 29, 2003Don TaborAircraft kite
US6663050Jan 8, 2003Dec 16, 2003Don TaborAircraft kite
US6854690Apr 11, 2003Feb 15, 2005Don TaborAircraft kite
US6905096Dec 11, 2003Jun 14, 2005Don TaborKite with planar aerodynamic surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/153.00R, 244/904
International ClassificationB64C31/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63H27/08, Y10S244/904
European ClassificationA63H27/08