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Publication numberUS3018504 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1962
Filing dateFeb 3, 1960
Priority dateFeb 3, 1960
Publication numberUS 3018504 A, US 3018504A, US-A-3018504, US3018504 A, US3018504A
InventorsHart William D
Original AssigneeRegina Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined suction operated floor washer and wax applier
US 3018504 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. D. HART Jan. 30, 1962 COMBINED SUCTION OPERATED FLOOR WASHER AND WAX APPLIER Filed Feb. 3, 1960 INVENTOR. J --37 WILLIAM D. HART BY 5 1- flux/M ATTORNEY United States Patent Oflice EfilSfifld Ratented Jan. 30, 1962 COMBINED SUCTIION @FERATED FLOOR WASHER AND WAX APPLIDER William D. Hart, Toledo, Qhio, assignor, by mesne assignrnents, to The Regina Corporation, Railway, N.Il., a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 3, 1960, fier. No. 6,526 4 Claims. (Cl. 15-42%) This invention relates to a self-contained suction operated floor tool, which is of dual purpose, i.e. it can be operated as a floor washer whereby water is delivered to the floor surface, spread and brushed thereon and then drawn into the tool along with dirt mixed therewith and which may thereafter be emptied from the body of the tool. Alternatively, by a single adjustment the tool may be used to spread a very thin film of wax emulsion or the like upon the floor surface, any excess emulsion being drawn into the body of the tool for reuse. The tool is so designed that a greater suction is employed for removing the dirt-laden water from the floor surface than is employed for removing excess wax emulsion. This has the advantage of leaving a very thin film of water to shorten the drying time for the floor surface when Washing is carried on, and on the other hand leaving a thicker film of wax emulsion on the surface, thus achieving a more desirable waxing operation.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter appear and for purposes of illustration, but not of limitation, an embodiment of the invention is shown on the accompanying drawings in which FIGURE 1 is an elevation of a tool in accordance with the invention for cleaning floor surfaces or for spreading wax-like liquids or emulsions on floor surfaces; and

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the main body of the tool shown on FIGURE 1.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention comprises an elongate tubular sheet metal body Iii, the lower end of which is closed by a head 11, the upper edge 12 of which is crimped to the lower edge of the body 10. At the upper end of the body is a ring 13 which is suitably secured as by welding to the inside of the body and is inwardly shouldered to provide a recess to receive an annular sealing ring 14 of rubber or similar material, the upper edge of the sealing ring extending slightly upwardly beyond the adjacent edge of the body 10.

Fitting over the upper end of the body 10 is a hollow sheet metal head 15 which is detachably secured to the body 10 by a pair of disengageable latch members 15a, one of which is shown on FIGURE 1. The head 15 is shouldered as indicated at 16 in order to flt over the upper edge of the body 10, the upper end of the sealing ring 14- abutting against the underside of a flanged disk 19 disposed within the head 15, the flange thereof being welded or otherwise secured to the inside of the head. The disk 19 has a central hole 20 and disposed directly above the hole is a suction fan 18 which creates a partial vacuum within the body of the tool for drawing liquid from the outside and discharging it inside of the body 10, the air being vented through the series of holes 21 formed in the head 15. The fan 18 is driven by a two-speed electric motor 17 within the head 15 and suitably fixed therein.

The upper end of the head 15 is formed with a reduced tubular extension 22 into which fits and is secured the lower end portion of an elongate tube 23 which provides the handle for the tool. The upper end portion of the tube 23 is bent as indicated at 24 to enable rotation of the tool by crank action for a purpose hereinafter to be described. Extending through the tube 23 and the bent end portion 24 is an electric cord 25 extending from the motor 17, the free end of the cord extending 0utwardly from the end of the bent end portion 24 and being provided with the usual attaching plug-26. Suitably connected to the cord 25' and disposed on the outside of the tube 23, preferably at the bend, is a three-way switch 27 which has a central off position, an upper high position where the motor 17 is energized at its high speed and a low position by which the motor is driven at its low speed. I

Disposed within the body 10 and arranged concentric thereof is an elongate suction tube 28, the lower end of which projects through and is secured to a tubular extension 29 on the lower closure head 11. Spaced upwardly from the closure head 11 a substantial distance is a cone-like disk 30, the small end of which is downwardly disposed. The disk has a peripheral flange 31 at its outer edge which is welded to the inside of the body 10. A central hole is formed in the apex of the cone disk 30 for admitting the tube 28, a flange 32 surrounding the hole and embracing the tube and being welded or otherwise suitably fixed to the tube. It will be apparent that the cone-like disk 30 and the end closure 11 form a chamber A therebetween; the purpose of this chamber will be described hereinafter.

Attached for rotating movement to the projecting end 37 of the tube 28 and telescoping therewith is a tubular inner end portion 36 of a hollow floor engaging tool 33. The tool 33 is formed with a laterally elongate hollow head 34- slotted at the bottom and, as shown, a bruh 35 rims the inlet slot of the head. The specific construction of the floor tool 33 forms no part of the present invention and, since it is well known in the art, further description and illustration are not considered necessary.

The arrangement is such that when the body 10 of the cleaner and associated parts are turned relative to the floor tool, liquid such as water in the compartment A may be discharged therefrom by gravity. For this purpose a hole is formed in the end of the head 11 and this is normally closed by a spring tensioned valve 38 which is carried by a lever pivoted to the head 11 and provided with a cam 38a at its inner end. Engageable with the cam 38a is a cam 39 carried by and rotatable with the upper end of the tubular end portion 36 of the floor tool. Manifestly by rotating the body relative to the floor tool, the earns 39 and 38a are brought into engagement thereby rocking the valve 38 to its open position and enabling the liquid in the chamber A to flow out onto the floor surface. Rotation in the opposite direction frees the cams and enables the spring to seat the valve 38.

Disposed within the tubular body 10 and spaced axially. from the cone disk 30 is a somewhat similar cone disk 40, the upper end of which is flanged at 41 and engages the walls of the body ltt to which it is fixed as by welding. At the lower end or apex of the cone 49' is a hole which is surrounded by a depending flange 42 in which is fixed the upper end of an elongate tube 43 which depends a substantial distance within the body 10 toward the cone 30. It will thus be apparent that between the cones 3i) and 40 is a chamber B which is spaced upwardly from the lower chamber A. Extending through the walls of the cone 3%) and having a portion projecting into the chamber A is an elongate open ended relatively small tube 4- 9, the upper end portion of which is fixed in any suitable manner to the outside. of the tube 43. The upper end of the tube 44 is downwardly bent as indicated at 45. The purpose of the tube 44 is to vent the interior of the chamber A so that when liquid is discharged from the chamber A, the liability of a partial vacuum being created therein is obviated.

It will be seen that the suction tube 28 passes through in spaced relation to and concentric with the tube 43.

The suction tube 28 extends upwardly beyond the upper end of the tube 43 and terminates in the region of the flange 41 of the cone 40. In the upper portion of the suction tube 28 in the region of the lower part of the cone 40 are relatively large holes 46. Closing the upper end of the tube 28 is a cup member 47 which fits over and is secured to the upper end of the tube. The cup has an imperforate bottom wall on top of which is disposed a. fiat disk 48 which is secured in place by a rivet 49. The disk 48 is of circular form and is provided at its peripheral edgm with a downturned flange 50.

Formed in the cone disk 30 is a hole 51 which may be closed by a valve 52 carried by an arm 52a pivotally mounted on bracket elements 53. For actuating the valve 52 to and from its seated position is a vertically disposed rod 54. The free end of the valve arm 52a is forked to engage the neck formed between enlargements 55 and 56 on the vertical rod 54 so that as the rod 54 moves upwardly, the valve is rocked to its closed position and when the rod 54 is shifted downwardly, the valve is unseated. The rod 54 is slidable through a rubber-like sealing grommet 57 in the upper cone disk 40 thereby to provide a liquid seal between the rod and the cone. At the upper end of the rod 54 are spaced enlargements 58 and 59 between which the forked end of a bell-crank 60 engages, the bell-crank being pivotally mounted on bracket means 60a connected to the tubular body 10. The opposite end of the bell-crank may be similarly forked to engage the reduced neck of an adjusting screw 61 which has a knurled head 62 disposed on the outside of the body 10, the screw 61 engaging a threaded bushing fixed in the wall of the body 10. Manifestly by turning the screw in one direction or the other through the connections described, the valve 52 may be moved to its seated or unseated position.

A filler cap 63 for the chamber A is screw-threadedly mounted on the outside of the head 11 to enable clean water to be introduced therein. Similarly for the chamber B, a screw cap 64 on the body above the cone disk 30 provides means for emptying the dirty water therefrom.

In operation, the valve 52 is closed when the tool is used for floor washing. In such case, a quantity of water is introduced into the chamber A through filler hole covered normally by the cap 63, usually an amount sufficient for about half filling the chamber. A non-sudsing detergent may be desirable to be mixed with the water. By turning the body relatively to the floor tool 33 by the handle 24, the valve 38 is unseated enabling a quantity of water to flow onto the floor surface, the vent or breather tube 44 obviating the liability of a partial vacuum which would otherwise interfere with the free liquid flow from the chamber A. The floor surface may then be scrubbed by the brush 35 and the water is spread over the desired area. Thereafter by flipping the switch 27 to the high position, the suction fan creates a subatmospheric pressure in the upper region of the body 10, thereby drawing practically all of the dirt-laden water from the floor surface through the floor tool 33 and suction tube 28 and discharges same through the holes 46 onto the cone 40 from which it flows through the tube 43 and into the chamber B. The disk 48 serves as a baffle to prevent water-laden air to pass to the fan 18. The dirty water may be emptied from the chamber B by removing the cap 64. Thus only clean water from the chamber A is spread over the floor surface and the dirty water is sucked into the chamber B. The upper end of the tube 44 should be above the level of the water in the chamber B in order to permit free flow of water from the chamber A.

This tool is adapted for spreading a layer of a wax-like emulsion upon a floor surface. At such times the valve 52 is opened. The emulsion is released from the chamber A by unseating the valve 38 as above described and after a suflicient qauntity is spread over the floor surface, the switch 27 is flipped to the low position so that the motor 17 drives the suction fan 18 at a relatively low or reduced speed for establishing a reduced suction force. The excess emulsion is then drawn through the floor tool 33, tube 28 and discharged through the holes 46 onto the cone 40. From thence the emulsion passes through the tube 43 to the chamber B and then past the open valve 52 into the chamber A where it is ready for reuse. By having the motor operate at low speed, a thicker film of the wax emulsion is left upon the floor surface. A thinner film may be left if the motor is driven at its high speed but ordinarily that leaves too thin a film for practical purposes. Manifestly when the tool is employed for floor washing, it is desirable to remove as much water as possible so that a dry floor surface will be afforded as soon as possible, and, of course, the thinner the film, the shorter time for evaporation is required. Should the operator so desire, the valve 52 may be left open for floor washing and then water sucked from the floor is reused.

A desirable feature of the construction enables the tool to be laid down without liability of liquid passing to the electric motor 17 and this is achieved by the cones 30 and 40 associated parts.

Numerous changes in details of construction, arrangement and operation may be effected without departing from the spirit of the invention, especially as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A suction operated floor tool comprising an elongate tubular housing, a floor tool at the lower end of the housing, a suction tube extending from the floor tool inside of the housing and terminating in the region of the upper end of the housing, a closure for the lower end of the housing and through which the suction tube extends, a partition spaced upwardly from the closure in liquid tight connection to the suction tube and housing to provide a lower chamber, a normally closed inlet opening in the side of the lower chamber, a valve controlled outlet leading directly from said chamber to the outside to enable the discharge of liquid therefrom onto a floor surface, a second partition spaced above said first partition in liquid tight relation to the housing to provide an upper chamber, said second partition being spaced from the suction tube to enable liquid to pass to the upper chamber from the upper side of the second partition, the suction tube having the portion extending through the lower chamber closed and also being closed above said second partition and having outlet holes below the closed end for the discharge of liquid sucked through such tube, a normally closed opening to enable the emptying of liquid from the upper chamber, manually operated valve means in said first partition for enabling, when open, liquid to flow from the upper chamber to the lower chamber, a suction fan at the upper end portion of the housing, and a two-speed electric motor for selectively driving the suction fan at a relatively high or low speed.

2. A suction operated floor tool comprising a tubular housing closed at opposite ends, a floor tool at the lower end of the housing, a suction tube extending from the floor tool inside the housing and terminating in the region of the upper end thereof, partition means separating the inside of the housing into a lower and an upper chamber, a valve controlled outlet to the outside from the lower chamber to enable liquid to flow therefrom directly onto a floor surface, there being holes in the upper end portion of said tube for discharging liquid into the upper chamber and the portion extending through the lower chamber being imperforate, means for militating against the creation of a partial vacuum in the lower chamber, controllable valve means in said partition means for enabling liquid to flow from the upper chamber to the lower chamber, a suction fan for creating a suction at the upper end of the housing, and a multi-speed electric motor for selectively driving the fan at different speeds.

3. A suction operated floor tool comprising an elongate tubular housing closed at its lower end, a motor driven suction fan for creating suction at the upper end of the housing, a floor tool, a suction tube leading from the floor tool through said closed lower end of the housing and terminating in the region of the upper end of the housing, the portion of said tube Within the housing being imperforate except for fluid outlet openings at the upper end portion thereof, baflie means for said outlet openings, a partition having liquid tight engagement with the tube and the inside wall of the housing to provide a lower chamber for clean water and an upper chamber for dirty water, valve controlled means for establishing communication between said chambers through said partition, and valve controlled means in the closed end of the housing for pouring water directly from the lower clean water chamber onto the floor surface.

4. A suction operated floor tool comprising an elongate tubular housing closed at its lower end, a motor driven suction fan for creating suction at the upper end of the housing, a floor tool, a suction tube leading from the floor tool through said closed lower end of the housing and terminating in the region of the upper end of the housing, the portion of said tube within the housing being imperforate except for fluid outlet openings at the upper end portion thereof, baflie means for said outlet openings, a partition having liquid tight engagement with the tube and the inside wall of the housing to provide a lower chamber for clean water and an upper chamber for dirty water, valve controlled means for establishing communication between said chambers through said partition, manual means on the outer wall of the housing for controlling the operation of said valve means, and valve controlled means in the closed end of the housing for pouring water directly from the lower clean water chamber onto the floor surface.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 930,628 Squier Aug. 10, 1909 1,849,663 Finnell Mar. 15, 1932 2,588,301 Snyder Mar. 4, 1952 2,693,000 Minerley Nov. 2, 1954 2,763,886 Brown et a1. Sept. 25, 1956 2,954,576 Helm Oct. 4, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US930628 *Oct 3, 1908Aug 10, 1909Arthur H SquierAir-suction cleaning apparatus.
US1849663 *Dec 26, 1928Mar 15, 1932Finnell Walter SVacuum floor mopper
US2588301 *Apr 22, 1946Mar 4, 1952Knapp Monarch CoCentrifugal speed control for vacuum cleaners
US2693000 *Jul 21, 1951Nov 2, 1954Air Way Electric Appl CorpSuction operated floor tool
US2763886 *Sep 26, 1950Sep 25, 1956Brown Jr Charles KeplerVacuum mop and strainer
US2954576 *Nov 6, 1958Oct 4, 1960Hoover CoSuction appliance
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4238869 *Nov 24, 1978Dec 16, 1980Fernand LachanceLiquid aspirator
US4536914 *Mar 7, 1984Aug 27, 1985Cic Int'l Corp.Wet-dry vacuum cleaner
US4542557 *Jul 5, 1984Sep 24, 1985Cic Int'l. Corp.Wet-dry vacuum cleaner
US4704764 *Jul 16, 1985Nov 10, 1987Metelko Jr Rudy RAsh disposal device
US4920606 *Jan 9, 1989May 1, 1990Black & Decker, Inc.Electrical power circuit for a vacuum cleaner
US5603139 *Dec 28, 1994Feb 18, 1997FamulusApparatus for cleaning by spreading cleaning liquid and by suction of the used liquid
US5768742 *Aug 12, 1995Jun 23, 1998Henkel-Ecolab Gmbh & Co. OhgMobile floor cleaner
US5933913 *Jun 8, 1998Aug 10, 1999Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Cordless wet mop and vacuum assembly
US5968281 *Jun 8, 1998Oct 19, 1999Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Method for mopping and drying a floor
US5983448 *May 22, 1998Nov 16, 1999Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Cordless wet mop and vacuum assembly
US6000088 *Jun 8, 1998Dec 14, 1999Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Cordless wet mop and vacuum assembly
US6065182 *Dec 31, 1996May 23, 2000Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Cordless wet mop and vacuum assembly
US6101671 *Jan 9, 1999Aug 15, 2000Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Wet mop and vacuum assembly
USRE33074 *Sep 23, 1987Oct 3, 1989Cic Int'l Corp.Wet-dry vacuum cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/320, 15/353
International ClassificationA47L11/00, A47L11/20
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4088, A47L11/4036, A47L11/408, A47L11/4044, A47L11/4008, A47L11/201, A47L11/4075
European ClassificationA47L11/40L, A47L11/40B4, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40F, A47L11/40N, A47L11/20A