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Publication numberUS3019325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1962
Filing dateDec 15, 1958
Priority dateDec 15, 1958
Publication numberUS 3019325 A, US 3019325A, US-A-3019325, US3019325 A, US3019325A
InventorsFrank S Clouse
Original AssigneeFrank S Clouse
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel heating device
US 3019325 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 30, 1962 F. s. CLOUS FUEL HEATING DEVICE Filed Dec. 15, 1958 am JI /oz/.se

ATTCI RN EYB United States Patent O 3,019,325 FUEL HEATING DEVICE Frank S. Clouse, 2702 Gallatin Road, Nashville, Tenn. Filed Dee. 1s, 195s, ser. No. 780,416 2 Claims. (Cl. Zlib-38) This invention relates to a vehicle, and more particularly to a fuel heating device for a vehicle.

The object of the invention is to provide a device which is adapted to be used for conveniently heating the fuel that is conveyed to the vehicle carburetor so that the engine can operate with greater efficiency.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fuel heating device for use with an internal combustion engine such as the engine of a vehicle, and wherein a switch is adapted to be conveniently located in the vehicle such as on the vehicle instrument panel or dashboard so that oy closing the switch, an electrical circuit to the fuel heating device will be completed whereby the fuel passing through the carburetor will be preheated in order to insure that the vehicle operates in a more satisfactory manner.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fuel heating device which is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, and in which like numerals are used to designate like parts throughout the same:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic View illustrating the fuel heating device of the present invention in use.

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view of the fuel heating device, with parts broken away and in section.

FIGURE 3 is a view showing certain constructional details of the device.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary perspective view, with parts broken away and in section.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of FIGURE 1.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral indicates a carburetor, while the numeral 11 indicates a fuel line which is adapted to convey fuel such as gasoline from a suitable source of supply such as a fuel tank, and the numeral 12 indicates a portion of the vehicle instrument panel or dashboard. The numeral 13 indicates a switch which is adapted to be mounted on the panel 12, and the carburetor 10 may be connected to the usual engine 14 in the conventional manner. The numeral 15 indicates a source of electrical energy such as the vehicle battery which is electrically connected to the switch 13.

According to the present invention there is provided a fuel heating device 16 which is interposed between the fuel line 11 and the carburetor 10, and the numeral 17 indicates a fitting or bushing which serves to connect the fuel line 11 to a tube 18 of the device 16. The tube 18 may be made of a suitable material such as copper, and the tube 18 leads to the carburetor 10.

Surrounding the tube 18 is a first layer of glass insulating tape 19, and the numeral 20 indicates a heating wire which is coiled around the tape 19. Surrounding the wire 2t) is a second layer of tape 21 which may also be made of glass insulating material, and the numeral 22 indicates a third layer of tape which surrounds the tape 21, and the `tape 22 may be made of plastic. The device 16 is grounded as at 23.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that there has been provided a fuel heating device which is adapted to be used for heating fuel such as fuel which enters the carburetor of a vehicle. According to the present invention, the device 16 is positioned between the fuel line 11 and the carburetor 10. When the fuel is to be heated, the switch 13 is closed and this completes the electrical circuit to the Patented Jan. 30, 1962 ICC pass through the fuel line 11, and then through the tube 18, and this fuel will be heated by means of the heating wire 20. This warmed up or preheated fuel will then enter the carburetor 10 so that the engine can be operated with greater eiiiciency.

The device 16 is connected to the fuel line 11 by means of the fitting 17, and the Wire 20 is covered by the tape 21, and the tape 21 is covered by the tape 22. The Wire 20 is positioned on the tape 19 which surrounds the copper tubing 18.

The parts can be made of any suitable material and in different shapes or sizes.

Some of the advantages of the present invention are as follows. The engine will have better performance, there will be less carbon deposited, and the engine will be able to operate on cheaper fuel and will be quicker starting in cold weather and increased mileage will be provided. By using the device in conjunction with the switch 13 on the dashboard 12, it can be turned on before starting in cold weather for the purpose of warming the fuel so as to cause quicker ignition.

The tubing 18 may be made of copper, and the tape 19 may be ofglass insulating material. Similarly, the tape 21 may be of glass insulating material, and the tape 22 may be made of plastic. A suitable fitting such as the fitting 24 can be used for connecting the device to the carburetor 10.

It is to be understood that by closing the switch 13, the electrical circuit from the battery 15 to the heating wire 2) will be completed so that the fuel passing through the tube 18 will be preheated before it enters the carburetor 10 for the previously described purpose.

Minor changes in shape, size and rearrangement of details coming within the field of invention claimed may be resorted to in actual practice, if desired.

I claim:

1. A fuel heating device comprising a fitting, a tube connected to said fitting, a first layer of insulated tape surrounding said tube, a heating wire coiled around said tape, a second layer of tape of the same composition as said first tape surrounding said heating wire, and a third layer of tape surrounding said second layer of tape, said third layer of tape being of a different composition and material than said first and second tapes.

2. A vehicle comprising a carburetor, an instrument panel, a switch on said instrument panel, a fuel line, a fuel heating device electrically connected to said switch and said fuel heating device being interposed between said carburetor and fuel line, said fuel heating device embodying a fitting operatively connected to said fuel line, a tube connected to said fitting, said tube adapted'to be connected to said carburetor, a first layer of glass insulating tape surrounding said tube, a heating wire coiled around said tape and said heating wire being electrically connected to said switch, a second layer of glass insulating tape surrounding said heating wire, and a third layer of tape surrounding said second layer of tape, said third layer of tape being plastic, and whereby by closing the switch, the electrical circuit to the heating wire will be completed so that the fuel passing through the tube will be preheated before it enters the carburetor.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 904,203 Hertzberg et al Nov. 17, 1908 1,293,456 Johns Feb. 4, 1919 1,756,008 Soprani Apr. 22, 1930 2,023,185 White Dec. 3, 1935 2,346,506 Pulliam Apr. 11, 1944 2,861,838 Wyatt et al. Nov. 25, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US904203 *Oct 10, 1907Nov 17, 1908Abbot A LowFuel-heater for explosive-engines.
US1293456 *Apr 11, 1917Feb 4, 1919William Douglas JohnsVaporizer.
US1756008 *Jan 28, 1930Apr 22, 1930Martin C PizzaiaFuel heater
US2023185 *Jan 3, 1935Dec 3, 1935White Clarence WilburFuel volatilizing device
US2346506 *Feb 1, 1943Apr 11, 1944Donald R ParkerFuel heating apparatus
US2861838 *Nov 6, 1956Nov 25, 1958Turbo Machine CoFluid spray cleaning machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3139518 *Jan 14, 1963Jun 30, 1964Northwest Ind LtdHeating element
US3275803 *Feb 6, 1964Sep 27, 1966True Cecil WPipe heating apparatus
US3412234 *Oct 25, 1966Nov 19, 1968Michael A. OtavkaHeater element and portable heated container
US4397287 *Sep 15, 1980Aug 9, 1983Jocelyn PierardMethod and apparatus for liquefying and/or heating a fluid
US4455474 *Nov 27, 1981Jun 19, 1984Nordson CorporationThermally insulated electrically heated hose for transmitting hot liquids
US4553023 *Jan 11, 1984Nov 12, 1985Nordson CorporationThermally insulated electrically heated hose for transmitting hot liquids
US5434388 *Oct 7, 1993Jul 18, 1995E.G.O. Elektro-Gerate Blanc U. FischerElectrical heater for media, particularly flow heater
US5544275 *Mar 17, 1993Aug 6, 1996Applied Materials, Inc.Electrically heated fluid carrying conduit having integrated heating elements and electrical conductors
US20090154909 *Oct 4, 2006Jun 18, 2009Pascal MeyerLiquid-heating device for electric household appliance
US20110286728 *Aug 30, 2010Nov 24, 2011Xiotin Industry Ltd.Heater and electric instant water heater
EP0045507A2 *Aug 3, 1981Feb 10, 1982Technar IncorporatedFuel heater for Diesel engines
EP1209346A2 *Nov 20, 2001May 29, 2002Giampiero CremonaDevice designed to improve combustion efficiency in internal combustion engines
WO2005044478A2 *Jun 18, 2004May 19, 2005Internat Resistive CompanyResistive film on aluminum tube
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/205, 219/546, 219/542, 219/544, 392/480
International ClassificationF02M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/435, F02M1/00
European ClassificationF02M1/00