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Publication numberUS3021601 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1962
Filing dateMay 15, 1957
Priority dateMay 15, 1957
Publication numberUS 3021601 A, US 3021601A, US-A-3021601, US3021601 A, US3021601A
InventorsBrice E Hayes
Original AssigneeBrice E Hayes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Track lining scope
US 3021601 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. E. HAYES 3,021,601

TRACK LINING SCOPE Feb. 20, 1962 Filed May l5, 1957 l5 Sheets-Sheet 1 210 FIG. 2 I8 C5) l lo f FIG 204 2|2` |78 le |96 2o n- 2l0 s w es malY 2.2 lss |44 '52 '66 I |30 ik. HV1:

/ls lIO ,72 |o6` f5:

x7 so w@ 4e /IZ INVENTOR BRICE E. HAYES ATTORNEY Feb. 20, 1962 B. E. HAYES 3,021,601

TRACK LINING SCOPE Filed May 15, 1957 3 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR BRICE E. HAYES 22 ATTORNEY Feb. 20, 1962 B. E. HAYES ATRACK LINING SCOPE:

3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May l5, 1957 INVENTOR FIG.7

ATTORNEY 3,021,601 TRACK LINING SCGPE Brice E. Hayes, 6710Northwest Highway,

' Chicago 31, Ill. Filed May 15, 1957, Ser. No. 659,366

- 11 Claims. ((21.33-60) This invention relates to optical instruments and more particularly for a device for use in lining railroad tracks.

The present device constitutes an improvement of the device illustrated in McMillan patent, No. 2,763,931, issued September 25, 1956. This patent discloses a track lining scope including a Ihase for attachment to a railroad track, a sta rigidly secured to the base and extending upwardly therefrom, and a telescope mounted on the upper end of the sta for movement in a vertical plane. While this device has proven satisfactory in operation, it has been found that the same is somewhat diicult to mount on the railroad track in properly aligned relation due to the fact that the staff is rigidly secured to the base. That is, a proper setting of the device requires that the stai `be aligned in a vertical plane andto accomplish this, the device included means on the base for rocking the base andthe stati attached thereto about a knife edge engaging the ball of the track. This adjustment has, two distinct disadvantages.` First, `because of the height of the stati, small angular movements of the base about the knife edge results in relatively large arcuate movements of the telescope on top the base. This makes adjustment of the device diicult and time-consuming. In addition, because of the rigid connection between the base and the stair, the telescope on top the staff often got out of alignment as when accidently engaged or the like. Second, since'the adjusting mechanism was carried by the base, it was necessary for the operator to stoop over to eiect proper leveling, which caused considerable inconvenience and rendered the overall efficiency ofthe device less favorable.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a track lining scope of the type described having improved means for aligning the telescope with the gauge side of the track, which means overcomes the disadvantages mentioned above.

Another disadvantage of the device disclosed in the McMillan patent is that the telescope was mounted on the upper end of the shaft in such a way that the operatorA could sight in only one direction. Thus, it was not possible to back check the track which had already been aligned with the advancing work.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a device of the type described including improved means for permitting the operator to back check the alignment of track as the work progresses in a simple and convenient manner.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a track lining scope of the type described having improved means for pivotally mounting a telescope carrying sta toa base arranged to be attached to a railroad track.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a track lining scope of `the type described having improved means for pivotally adjusting the telescope carrying stati about the base arranged to be secured to a railroad track.

Still 'another object of the present invention is the provision of a device of the type described which has parts collapsible and detachable for purpose of `storage so that 3,021,601 Patented Feb. 20, 1962 A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a track lining scope of the type described which is simple in construction, easy to operate and economical to manufacture and maintain.

These and other objects-of the present invention will become more apparent during thecourse of the following detailed description and appended claims. Y

The invention may be best understood with reference to' the accompanying drawings wherein zin-illustrative en tbodim'ent is shown. v

In the drawings: l

FIGURE l is a perspective view of a device embodying the principles ofthe present invention showing the same mounted on a railroad track;

FIGURE 2 is a front elevational view of the device shown in FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is across-sectional view taken along the line 3--3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a `cross-sectional view taken along the line 4--4 ofFIGURE 3; v

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 5--5 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken along the line 6 6 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary .cross-sectional view taken along the line 7--7 of FIGURE 2; FIGURE 8 is a front elevationalview of the structure shown in FIGURE 7, with parts broken away for the purposes of clearer illustration;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken along the line 9--9 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE l0 is a front elevational view of the structure shown in FIGURE 9, with parts broken away for the purposes of clearer illustration; l l

FIGURE 1l is a cross-sectional view une 11-11 of FIGURE 2; a

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary front -elevational view of the structure shown in FIGURE 1l; i

FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the structure shown in FIGURE 11; n, l

FIGURE 14 is a vertical cross-sectionalview illustrattaken along the v ing the manner in which the telescope is mounted on the the same can easily be transported from one place to upper end of the supporting stati; and

FIGURE 15 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 15-15 of FIGURE 14.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, there is shown a device, generally indicated at 10, which embodies the principles of the present invention. In general, the device includesa base 12 arranged to be rigidly secured to a railroad track, a telescope supporting statt, generally indicated at 14, pivotally secured at its lower end to the 'base about an axis generally parallel to the longitudinal extent of the railroad track and means, generally indicatedk at 16, is provided for eiecting pivotal movement of the stal 14 about its axis with respect to the base 12 so as to bring the staif into true vertical alignment. Removably mounted on the upper end of the staff 14 for pivotal movement in a vertical plane is a telescope assembly, generally indicated at 18, which, when the staif is truly vertical, is automatically disposed in the plane of the gauge side of the track and may be pivoted in that plane todetermine the proper lateral alignment of the track on which the device is mounted.

As best shown in FIGURES 3-6, the base 12 is generally of invertedv U-shaped construction and preferably is cast of a suitable metal, such as aluminum alloy or the like. The base 12 includes a horizontal portion 20 having a gauge portion 22 extending downwardlyv from one side thereof and an opposite vertical portion 24 ex:. tending downwardly from the opposite side thereof. The interiorsurface of the gauge portion 22 preferably has a pad 26 .of suitable resilient material, such as rubber or 3 the like, secured thereto by any suitable means, such as by bolts 28 or the like.

The opposite depending portion 24 has a threaded aperture 30 formed therein for receiving a threaded stern 32, the outer end of which has a knob or handle 34 rigidly secured thereto. The inner end of the stem 32 has rotatably mounted thereon a track engaging disk 36 or the like. Disposed at each end of the horizontal portion 26 of the base 12 is a longitudinally extending, depending portion 38 for contacting the tread of a railroad track in substantial line engagement. As shown, the portions 38 are V- shaped and constitute knife edges which engage the tread of the track, however, it will be understood that a rounded projection or other suitable construction may be employed, if desired.

As best shown in FIGURE 3, the horizontal portion 20 of the base 12 is preferably rectangular in shape adjacent the gauge portion 22 and tapers inwardly toward the opposite depending portion 24. Formed in the center of the horizontal base portion 2t) is a vertical opening 40 having upwardly facing recesses 42 and 44 extending laterally outwardly therefrom. The opening 4t) is arranged to receive the lower end of a member 46 which has its upper end secured to the lower end of the staff 14 and serves to pivotally mount the latter on the base 12. The member 46 is of generally cylindrical shape having a pair of longitudinally spaced depending boss portions 48 on the lower end thereof. The boss por-tions have aligned longitudinally extending apertures 56 formed therein for receiving a pair of stub shafts 52. The shafts 52 are arranged to extend longitudinally through the apertures 50 and into downwardly facing recesses' 54 formed in the horizontal portion 20. In order to secure the shafts within the recesses 54 and against rotation, set screws 56 extend vertically through the horizontal base portion 20 and engage in the outer ends of the shafts 52.

The member 46 also includes a pair of laterally projecting portions 58 and 60 which are arranged to be disposed within the recesses 42 and 44 of the horizontal base portion 20 respectively. The undersurface of the portion 58 has a pair of longitudinally spaced bores 62 formed therein for receiving one end of a pair of coil springs 64, the other end of which seats within a pair of aligned bores 66 formed therebelow in the horizontal base portion 20. The opposite laterally projecting portion 60 has a vertically extending threaded aperture 68 formed centrally therein 'which receives an elongated threaded stem 70, the lower end of which is adapted to engage the horizontal base portion 20 disposed therebelow.

' The staff 14 is preferably telescopic and, as shown, includes a lower tube 72 of relatively large diameter, an intermediate tube 74 having an exterior diameter slightly less than the .interior diameter of lthe tube 72, and an upper tube -76 having an exterior diameter slightly less than the interior diameter of the tube 74. As best shown in FIGURE 5, the lower `end of the lower tube '72 is preferably .kurled, as indicated at 78, so that it may be rigidly secured within the upper end of the sleeve-like member 46.

-Referringnow more particularly 'to FIGURES 7 and 8, the upper end of the lower tube 72 is also' knurled, as. indicated at 80, so as to rigidly iit within the lower end of an adjusting sleeve member 82. The mid-portion of the sleeve v82l has a horizontal slot 84 extending therein an arcuate distancey of substantially 180. The upper end of the sleeve 82 above the slot 84 is vertically split, as indicated at 86, -and has a pair of outwardly extending ears 88 and 90 rigid therewith. The extreme upper end of the sleeve 82 is preferably provided with an inwardly directed annular flange 92. The lower end of the intermediate tube 74 has formed therein a pair of longitudinally spaced annular portions 96 projecting outwardly therefrom for engagement with the interior surface of the lower tube 72 at longitudinally spaced positions. Disposed within the upper end of the sleeve '82 is a split sleeve 98 which may be made of fiber or other suitable material.

As best shown in FIGURE 7, the ear 88 includes a horizontal aperture 100 through which a threaded stem 162 extends for engagement with an aligned threaded aperture 1134 formed in the ear 90. The outer end of the threaded stem 102 includes a handle or knob 106 for turning the latter. The ear 96 extends outwardly beyond the ear 88 and has a vertical aperture 188 formed therein for loosely receiving the upper end of the threaded stern '70. A knob or handle 110 is rigidly mounted on the upper extremity of the stern 70 for turning the same. It will be noted that the stern 70 and spring 64 constitute the means 16 for effecting pivotal movement of the telescope supporting staff 14 about its axis with respect to the base 12.

Referring now more particularly to FIGURES 9 and l0, the upper end of the intermediate tube 74 is knurled, as indicated at 112, to rigidly tit within the lower end of a sleeve member 114 somewhat similar to the sleeve member 82. As before, the sleeve member 114 is provided with a horizontal slot 116 extending therethrough an arcuate distance approximately of 180. The upper end of the sleeve member 114 is vertically split, as indicated at 118, and has ears 120 and 122 extending outwardly therefrom. The ear 126 is provided with a horizontal aperture 124 through which a threaded stem 126 extends for engagement within a threaded aperture 128 formed in the ear 122. The opposite end of the threaded stem has a knob or handle 130 mounted thereon for turning the same. An inturned flange 132 is formed on the upper extremity of the sleeve member 114 and a split sleeve 134, similar to the split sleeve 98, is mounted within the sleeve member 114 between the flange 132 and the upper end 0f the intermediate tub-e 74. As before, the lower end of the upper tube 76 has formed therein a pair of longitudinally spaced annular portions 136 projecting outwardly therefrom for engagement with the interior surface of the intermediate tube 74.

Referring now more particularly to FIGURES 1l-l3, a sleeve member 138 vertically split as at 146 is secured to the upper end of the upper tube 76. The sleeve includes ears 142 and 144, the ear 142 having a horizontal aperture 146 formed therein to receive a bolt 14S extending therethrough and engaged with an aligned threaded aperture 150 formed in the ear 144. As best shown in FIGURE l, the inner end of an arm 152 is disposed bctween the ears 142 and extends laterally outwardly therefrom for pivotal movement about the bolt 148 and its axis. The outer end of the arm 152 has mounted thereon a visored mirror 154, of any suitable construction. In addition, a double-faced light reflector 156, of conventional construction, is pivotally mounted on the outer end of the arm 152 by any suitable means, such as a vertical mounting yarm or the like (not shown).

The sleeve member '138 also includes a longitudinally extending portion 158 having a horizontal transversely extending bore 160 formed therein. Mounted within the bore is a spirit level element 162 which can be viewed through an arcuate recess 164 formed in the upper sur-l face of the portion 158 in communication with the bore 160.

Referring now more particularly to FIGURES 14 and l5, a lower telescope mounting head member 166 has its lower end recessed for entry within the upper end of the upper tube 76 and for securement therein by the sleeve member 138. Extending vertically downwardly from the upper end of the member I166 is a bore 168 and a concentric bore 170 extends upwardly 'from the lower end thereof and forms with the bore 168 an inwardly extending apertu-red flange 172. The bore 168 is arranged to receive a depending `stern or stub shaft 176 of a second upper telescope mounting'head member 178. The lower end of the shaft 176 is thrcadedly apertured, as indicated at 180, to receive la headed bolt v182, the head of which 5. engages a washer 184 resting against the lower edge of the flange 172 so as to rotatably secure the shaft 176 within the bore 168. As shown in FIGURE 14, a suitable washer 186 is disposed between the upper surfacel of the lower head member and the lower surf-ace of the upper head member to reduce the friction therebetween.

As best shown in FIGURE 15, an arcuate groove 188 is formed in the upper surface of the lower member 166. Preferably, the groove 188 is arcuate about the axis of rotation of the shaft 176 for an arcuate distance of approximately 60 and then extends tangentially toward an enlarged corner portion-190 formed on the upper end of the member 166. A threaded aperture 192 extends through the enlarged corner portion 190 in communica tion with the tangential end of the groove 188 and receives a threaded stem 194 having a knurled knob or the like 196 rigidly secured to its outer end. The inner end of the threaded stem 194 engages a pin 198 rigidly secured to the upper member 178 and extending downwardly therefrom into the groove 188. It will be understood that the disk 186 is also provided with an aperture corresponding with the arcuate groove 188 through which the pin extends. A coil spring 200 is disposed within the arcuate portion of the groove 188 and has one end in engagement with the end of the arcuate groove and its opposite end in engagement with the pin 198. It will beseen that by turning the threaded stem 194 by knob 196, the upper member 178 can be moved into different positions of rotational adjustment with respect to the lower member 166.

The upper member 178 also includes a horizontal transversely extending bore 202 arranged to receive the tele-v scope assembly 18. The telescope assembly 18 includes a mounting member 204 having an upper sleeve 206 and a lower sleeve S-formed thereon in Vertical-alignment. An upper telescope 210 is positioned within the sleeve 206 and a lower telescope 212 is positioned within sleeve 208. A transversely extending stub shaft 214 extends transversely outwardly from the mounted member 204 and is rigidly secured thereto by any suitable means, such as bolt 216 extending through the stub shaft and engaged within the mounted member. Preferably, a friction disk 218 is secured between the mounted member 204 and the stub shaft 214 and relative rotation between the stub shaft, disk, and mounted member is prevented by means of a pin 220 extending between these elements, as shown in FEGURE 14.

The bore 202 of the upper member 178 is adapted to receive the stub shaft 214 of the telescope assembly anda counterbore 222 is formed in the member 178 for receiving the disk 218. 'in order to removably secure the telescope assembly within the head member 178 for swinging movement about the axis of the stub shaft, the latter is provided with a groove 224 extending circumferentially about the periphery thereof an arcuate distance approximately 180 and spaced inwardly from the outer end thereof. A longitudinally extending groove 226 is formed in the exterior surface of the stub shaft and extends from the outer extremity thereof into communication with the circumferentially extending groove 224. The upper member 178 also includes a bore 228 extending downwardly from the upper surface thereof into communication with the bore 202. A ball 230 ,is disposed within the lower end of the bore 228 and is resiliently urged toward the bore 202 by means of a coil spring 232 having one end in engagement with the ball and its opposite end in engagement with a set screw 234 or the like threadedly engaged with the upper end of the bore 228.

Operation It will be understood that the telescope supporting stal 14 of the present device is collapsible and the telescope assembly 18 is removable so that the device may be readily transported in a convenient manner from place to place, as, for example, in a suitable carrying case.

When it is desired to utilize the device, the base andstaff, with the telescope assembly 18 detached therefrom, is mounted on the rail by engaging the pad 26 with the gauge side of the track and the depending portions 38 with the tread of the track. The staff is then aligned so that it is approximately vertical to the eye and the knob 34 is turned until the disk 36 engages the opposite side of the track, thus rigidly securing the base thereto in substantially horizontal position.v Next, ,the intermediate tube 74 is raised relative to the' lower tube 72 by loosening the threaded stem 102 with the knob 106. When the intermediate tube has been fully extended, the knob 106 is turned to tighten the sleeve member 82 so as to secure the intermediate tube in its elevated position. Next, the upper tube is extended by lirst loosening the, threaded stem 126 by knob 130 and then tightening the latter after the upper section has been extended to the desired level. The stub shaft 214 of the telescope as sembly is next inserted within the bore 202 of the upper head member 178 with the groove 226 extending upwardly so that as the telescope assembly is moved into the bore, the ball 232 will engage within the circumferentially extending groove 224. When the ball has reached the circumferentially extending groove, the telescope assembly is rotated about the axis'of the shaft to a substantially horizontal position.

With the telescope assembly 18 mounted on the upper end of the staff, the device is next leveled by the means 16. In this regard, it will be noted that the vertical cross-hairs of the telescopes 210 and 212 are in vertical alignment with the exposed surface of the pad 26 so that when the staff 14 is brought into true vertical alignment, the vertical cross-hairs of the telescopes will be disposed in the vertical plane of the gauge side of the track. The projecting portions 38 which contact the tread of the track with a line engagement are disposed from the exposed surface of the pad 26 a horizontal distance equal to the horizontal distance between the center line of the staff and the vertical cross-hairs of thev telescopes. Thus, with the baseA disposed substantially horizontally, alignment of the staff in a true vertical po-A sition will automatically align the vertical'cross-hairs ofthe telescopes in the vertical plane of the gauge side of the track. In this regard, it will be noted that the pivotal axis between the staff and base is disposed in the verticalplane of the center line of the staff and that the line engagement of the projecting portions 38 is also disposed in this vertical plane immediately below the pivotal axis.

It will be readily understood that the spring 62 resiliently urges the staff about its pivotal axis in a clockf wise direction, as viewed in FIGURE 2. This movement is limited -by the engagement by the lower end of the stem 70, with the horizontal base portion 20 disposed therebelow. Thus, by turning the threaded stern '70 with the knob 110, the staff 14 can be moved into any position of angular adjustment with respect to the base within the limits provided. With the above in mind, the operator can bring the staff 14 into true vertical alignment by simply reaching down and turning the knob while viewing the spirit level element 162 through the opening 164. When the spirit level is cen tered, the staff is disposed in a true vertical position.

With the staff 14 adjusted to a true vertical position, the knob 196 is turned to swing the telescope assembly in a horizontal plane about the axis of the shaft 176 until the vertical cross-hairs of the telescopes are aligned with a fixed reference point relative to the gauge side of the track. As theV telescope assembly is tilted vertically aboutvthe axis of shaft 214, the vertical crosshairsfof each telescope will follow the gauge edge of a perfectly lined rail.

In this regard, the upper telescope 210 is arranged for forward sighting, while the lower telescope is arranged to sight work which has already been done. Thus,

to check sight work, the operator merely walks to the other side of the device and sights through the lower telescope, moving the same about the horizontal axis of the shaft 214 so that the vertical cross-hair thereof will follow the gauge side of the track.

With the use of the upper telescope, the operator is provided with an accurate picture of the alignment of the rail which enables him to instruct the crew to effect such alignments with positive assurance. By checksighting back work, a single setting of the present device will assure approximately one-quarter mile of perfectly lined tangent track.

It can thus be seen there has been provided a track lining device which is compact, simple in operation, sturdy and accurate. The telescope supporting statt 14 provides a wide range height adjustment for stand-up sighting, when desired, and the adjusting means 16 provides high-level adjustment so that it is no longer necessary for the operator to squat down to level the device. The provision of twin telescopes enables the operator to check sight back work so as to insure that the work which is advancing is in true alignment with the work that has already preceded. The telescopes utilized may be conventional six-powered instruments with achromatic optical systems. Each telescope is preferably protected by two exible rubber extenders.

It thus will be seen that the objects of this invention have been fully and effectively accomplished. It will be realized, however, that the foregoing specific embodi ment has been shown and described only for the purpose of illustrating the principles of this invention and is Subject to extensive change without departure from such principles. Therefore, this invention includes all modifications encompassed within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

l claim:

l. A lining scope for use in the lateral alignment of railroad track comprising a base having means for rigidly securing the same to a rail of a railroad track, a vertical stati' pivotally mounted at its lower end on said base for movement about an axis longitudinal of the rail when said base is mounted thereon, telescope means carried by the upper end of said staff, and means connected between said staff and said base operable from a position disposed substantially above said base for pivoting said staff about said axis so as to dispose Ithe longitudinal axis of said telescope means in the vertical plane of the gauge side of said rail.

2. A lining scope as defined in claim 1 wherein said telescope means comprises a pair of oppostely facing telescopes having their axes parallel and disposed in a common vertical plane.

3. A lining scope as defined in claim l including means for removably mounting said telescope means on said staff for swinging movement about a transverse horizontal axis` 4. A lining scope for use in the lateral alignment of railroad track comprising a base having means for fixedly securing the same to a rail of a railroad track, a lower elongated staff member extending upwardly from and pivotally mounted on said base about an axis longitudinal of the rail when said base is mounted thereon, an upper elongated staff member mounted for vertical movement with respect to said lower member, means for securing said upper member in different vertical positions of adjustment with respect to said lower member, a telescope mounted on said upper member for swinging move. ment about a transverse horizontal axis, and means connected between said base and said lower member for pivoting the latter about the first-named axis so as to dispose the longitudinal axis of said telescope in the vertical plane of the gauge side of the rail, and means disposed substantially above said base for actuating said pivoting means.

5. A lining scope as defined in claim 4 including means between said upper member and said telescope for moving the latter in different positions of adjustment about the vertical axis of said upper member.

6. A lining scope as defined in claim 4 wherein said upper member has a horizontally disposed spirit level mounted on the upper end portion thereof for indicating the true vertical position of said members.

7. A lining scope for use in the lateral alignment of railroad track comprising: a base for mounting on a rail of a railroad track, said base including a horizontal portion having a longitudinally extending depending por tion for substantial line engagement with the tread of the rail, a gauge portion extending downwardly from one side of said horizontal portion for engagement with the gauge side of the rail, and clamping means for engaging the opposite side of the rail for iixedly securing the base thereto with said gauge portion in engagement With the gauge side of the rail and said projection in line engagement with the tread of the rail; a staff extending upwardly from said base; means securing the lower end of said staff to said base for pivotal movement about an axis longitudinal of the rail when said base is mounted thereon; a telescope carried by the upper portion of said staff; and means for pivoting said staff about said axis so as to dispose the longitudinal axis of the telescope in the vertical plane of the gauge side of the rail.

8. A lining scope as defined in claim 7 wherein said pivotal axis is disposed slightly above and in the same vertical plane as the line engagement of said depending portion.

9. A lining scope as defined in claim 7 wherein said pivotal securing means includes a member secured to the lower end of said staff having aperture means formed therein, said aperture means having an axis extending longitudinally of the rail when said base is fixed thereto; and pivot pin means carried by the horizontal portion of said base disposed in said aperture means.

`l0. A lining scope as defined in claim 9 wherein said member includes portions disposed on opposite sides of the axis of said aperture means and extending transversely to said axis and wherein said staff pivoting means includes spring means between the horizontal portion of said base and one of the transversely extending portions of said member for biasing the latter and said staff about said axis in one direction and a threaded element operatively oonnected between the horizontal poriton of said base and the other transversely extending portion of said member, said threaded element being threadedly engaged in one of said portions and abutting the other of said portions for controlling the position into which said staff is biased by said spring means.

11. A lining scope as defined in claim 10 wherein said threaded element extends upwardly above said base a substantial distance and has an actuating knob mounted on its upper end.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,199,059 Doty Sept. 26, 1916 1,993,485 Paul Mar. 5, 1935 2,128,409 Hager Aug. 30, 1938 2,763,931 McMillan Sept. 25, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 70 Great Britain `Tan. 9, 1865 50,782 Austria Nov. 25, 1911 215,981 Great Britain May 22, 1924

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1199059 *Apr 30, 1915Sep 26, 1916Charles E DotyInstrument for use in raising and lining railroad-tracks.
US1993485 *Jul 24, 1934Mar 5, 1935Clifford B PaulPortable camera support
US2128409 *Aug 28, 1936Aug 30, 1938Hager Emil FScope stand
US2763931 *Mar 6, 1953Sep 25, 1956Brice E HayesTrack lining scope
AT50782B * Title not available
GB215981A * Title not available
GB186500070A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3653599 *May 19, 1970Apr 4, 1972Speco IncFluid spray apparatus
US4908249 *Oct 24, 1988Mar 13, 1990C.K.T. Investments LimitedMarkers for hydrants and other underground utilities fixtures
US5878519 *Jun 16, 1997Mar 9, 1999Woudenberg Enterprises, Inc.Sign support apparatus
US6588114 *Jul 7, 2000Jul 8, 2003Michael DaigleMeasuring pump device
EP0619401A1 *Dec 11, 1993Oct 12, 1994Ab BewagA method and a device for adjusting the position of elongated elements, especially railway tracks
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/287, 248/214
International ClassificationE01B35/08
Cooperative ClassificationE01B35/08
European ClassificationE01B35/08