Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3022657 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1962
Filing dateFeb 21, 1961
Priority dateMay 12, 1958
Publication numberUS 3022657 A, US 3022657A, US-A-3022657, US3022657 A, US3022657A
InventorsHampton William C
Original AssigneeAmerican Instr Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Penetrometer for porosimeters
US 3022657 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 27, 1962 w. c. HAMPTON PENETROMETER FOR POROSIMETERS Original Filed May 12, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 l i l; I

To l Aun/M Pu MP INVENTOR.

WILLIAM HAMPTON Vy mMz %1m Arne N: Y

Feb. 27, 1962 w. c. HAMPTON 3,022,657

' PENETROMETER FOR POROSIMETERS Original Filed May 12, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIB-3 Punuu Gautmrok n Hum 24 Z8 IEJIKVQ/L Pam/e: Gavan rm (urarr VA Av;

INVENTOR. WILLIAM C. HAMPTON 7 FIE'|.5 BVMMX Arr-oz NE Y llnited States Patent C) H 3,022,657 PENETROMETER FOR POROSIMETERS Wiiliam C. Hampton, Takoma Park, Md., assiguor to Alister-ken Instrument Company, Inc., Silver Spring, 1

Original application May 12, 1958, Ser. No. 734,778. Divided and this application Feb. 21, 1961, Ser. No. 90,709

Claims. (Cl. 73-38) This is a division of Serial No. 734,778, filed May 12, 1958, entitled Penetrometer and Filling Device Therefor for Porosimeters.

This invention relates to porosimeters, and more particularly to a penetrometer for use with a porosimeter of the type employing the mercury intrusion method.

A main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved penetrometer for use in a porosimeter of the type employing the mercury intrusion method to measure the sizes and volumes of the pores of porous materials.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved penetrometer for use in 'a porosimeter, said penetrometer being simple in construction, being easy to fill, and being especially suitable for use in testing powdered samples of material, the penetrometer being formed and arranged so that it is not necessary to employ means to plug up its capillary stem to prevent the powdered material from entering the capillary passage thereof and so that the inconvenience and inaccuracy involved in using such means is avoided.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved penetrometer for use in a porosimeter of the type disclosed in US. Patent No. 2,886,964, to Justin J. Shapiro and Nathaniel M. Winslow.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view, partly in vertical cross-section, of an improved penetrometer and a filling device therefor, constructed in accordance with, the present invention, the penetrometer being shown in its inverted position and arranged for filling.

FIGURE 2 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on line 22 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is'an enlarged vertical cross-sectional view taken through the bulb end of the penetrometer on the line 33 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 44 of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a schematic view showing the conduit connections of a porosimeter such as that disclosed in US. Patent No. 2,886,964, wherein a penetrometer according to the present invention may be employed, and illustrating how said penetrometer is utilized.

In a porosimeter employing the mercury intrusion method, as disclosed in US. Patent No. 2,886,964, a gas-free hydraulic system is used to transmit pressure from a pres sure generator 24 (FIGURE 5) to a pressure vessel 32 containing a calibrated transparent chamber, such as a penetrometer 57, exposed to the pressure in said pressure vessel and containing the porous material under test. The volume of penetration by mercury after application of pressure, at each pressure, is read on the calibrated stem of the penetrometer, which is visible through a transparent window section of the pressure vessel.

The porosimeter includes respective pressure gauges 21, 22 and 23. Gauge 21 measures pressure from zero to 15 pounds per square inch absolute, gauge 22 measures pressure from zero to 300 pounds per square inch, and gauge 23 measures pressure from zero to 3000 pounds per square inch.

ice

The outlet of the pressure generator 24 is connected through a conduit 35 and a manually operated control valve 30 to the bottom member 31 of the pressure vessel 32 through a cross fitting 36. A hydraulic fiuid supply conduit 34, provided with a manually controlled valve 28 is connected between a fluid reservoir and the pressure generator 24. Gauge 23 is connected through a conventional gauge protector 38 and a conduit 39 to cross fitting 36.

Gauge 22 is connected through a conventional gauge protector 40 and a conduit 41, including a manually controlled cut-ofi valve 42 to the cross fitting 36.

Gauge 21 is connected through a conduit 44 and a vacuum cut-off valve 45 to a conventional external vacuum pump. Also connected to the conduit 44 is a conduit 47 connected to the upper conduit-connection tube 48 of a filling device 49, shown in detail in FIG- URES l and 2.

Filling device 49 comprises an upper chamber element 50 and a tubular lower chamber element 51 having a tapered top end portion 52 adapted to be sealingly and detachably secured in the downwardly flaring lower end portion 53 of upper chamber element 50. Chamber element 50 has the rounded top end wall 54.

Chamber element 51 has the conical bottom end portion 55 adapted to supportingly receivethe end of the calibrated tube portion 56 of the penetrometer 57, as shown in FIGURE 1.

Integrally formed with the bottom of the conical member 55 and depending axially therefrom is a conduit 55' provided with a manually operated cut-off valve'56, leading to a spherical reservoir 57', integrally connected to the end of the conduit 55'. A pressure-equalizing conduit 58' connects reservoir 57' to a portion of tubular chamber 51 spaced a substantial distance above theconical lower end 55 thereof, as shown at 59'.

Chamber 51 is provided with a horizontally extending conduit element 59 provided with a three-way stop cock 60 formed with an atmospheric vent conduit 61 and another conduit 62, said stop cock being of conventional construction. The stop cock 60 is provided with an operating element 63 which may be rotated to respective different positions in which the stop cock 1) seals off conduit 59, (2) connects conduit 59 to conduit 62, or (3) connects conduit 59 to atmospheric vent conduit 61.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the downwardly flaring skirt member 53 is formed at its lower end with a peripheral head 60'. Above said bead, the skirt member 53 is provided iwth respective upwardly and outwardly projecting lugs 61', 61. The upper portion of chamber 51 is provided with respective downwardly and outwardly extending lugs 62', 62' located below the lugs 61', 61. Respective coiled fastening springs 83' are detachably fastened at their ends to the pairs of lugs 61, 62' and engage on the bead 60', as shown in FIGURE 1, whereby the tension of the springs acts to retain the skirt member53 in'sealing engagement with the upwardly tapering member 52.

The filling device 49 is adapted to be supported in a vertical position by conventional supporting clamps on a vertical bracket on the porosimeter, as described in US. Patent No. 2,886,964. Also adjustably supported on this bracket is a bottle containing suitable hydraulic liquid, such as alcohol, or the like, the conduit 34 being connected to the lower portion of this bottle through the supply valve 28. Also supported on this bracket is another bottle adapted to contain mercury, said last-named bottle being located below the filling device 49 and being "50 arranged that the depending vertical portion 72 of the conduit element 62 may be at times engaged through the neck of the bottle into the mercury contained therein,

5 tions be placed on the invention except as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a porosimeter, a penetrometer comprising a bellshaped element, a sealing plate on said bell-shaped element, means clampingly securing said plate to said bellshaped element, an elongated, tubular, open-ended stem member rigidly and communicatively connected to said bell-shaped element, and an extension of said tubular stem member in said bell-shaped element extending toward and terminating a relatively short distance from said sealing plate, said extension defining an annular sample-retaining space around the extension in said bellshaped element.

2. A penetrometer comprising a "bell-shaped member, a peripheral flange on said bell-shaped member, a cover disc sealingly engaged on said flange, a ring member surrounding said flange and said cover disc, means on said ring member engaging beneath said flange, a clamping member threadedly engaged in the upper portion of said ring member and clampingly engaging said cover disc, an elongated, tubular, open-ended stem element rigidly and communicatively connected substantially axially to said bell-shaped member, and an extension of said tubular stem element in said bell-shaped member extending toward and terminating a relatively short distance from said cover disc, said extension defining an annular sampleretaining space around the extension in said bell-shaped member.

3. A penetrometer comprising a bell-shaped element,

' and an extension of said tubular stem member in said bell-shaped element extending toward and terminating a relatively short distance from said sealing means, said extension defining an annular sample-retaining space around the extension in said bell-shaped element.

4. A penetrometer comprising a bell-shaped element, a sealing plate secured on said bell-shaped element, an elongated, tubular, open-ended stem member rigidly and communicatively connected to said bell-shaped element, and an extension of said tubular stem member in said bell-shaped element extending toward and terminating a relatively short distance from said sealing plate, said extension defining an annular sample-retaining space around the extension in said bell-shaped element.

5. A penetrometer comprising a bell-shaped element, a sealing plate secured on said bell-shaped element, an elongated, tubular, open-ended stem member rigidly and communicatively connected to said bell-shaped element, and an extension of said tubular stem member in said bell-shaped element extending toward and terminating a relatively short distance from said sealing plate, said extension being bevelled at its top end and defining an annular sample-retaining space around the extension in said bell-shaped element.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3289890 *Nov 12, 1964Dec 6, 1966American Can CoCan opener and dispenser
US3371519 *Mar 11, 1966Mar 5, 1968American Instr Co IncPorosimeter
US3388586 *Jan 5, 1965Jun 18, 1968Commissariat Energie AtomiquePorosimeter
US3501944 *Jan 3, 1969Mar 24, 1970Prado Lab IncApparatus for measuring pore size and pore volume
US4203317 *Jun 20, 1978May 20, 1980Gupta Krishna MPorosimeter
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/38
International ClassificationG01N15/08
Cooperative ClassificationG01N15/0886
European ClassificationG01N15/08M1