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Publication numberUS3023447 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1962
Filing dateOct 15, 1958
Priority dateOct 15, 1958
Publication numberUS 3023447 A, US 3023447A, US-A-3023447, US3023447 A, US3023447A
InventorsSenne Edgar P
Original AssigneeSenne Edgar P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall-installed vacuum cleaner
US 3023447 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1962 E. P. SENNE ,4

WALL-INSTALLED VACUUM CLEANER Filed Oct. 15, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Ticll.

l I l 1 INVENTOR. fwA/e ESE/WE March 6, 1962 E. P. SENNE WALL-INSTALLED VACUUM CLEANER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 15, 1958 INVENTOR. 506 42 PJZWA/E BY ,4 rTaPA/E r5 March 6, 1962 E. P. SENNE WALL-INSTALLED VACUUM CLEANER 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 15, 1958 Al/ve' ATTORA/EKS Vfi// a y a March 6, 1962 E. P. SENNE WALL-INSTALLED VACUUM CLEANER Filed Oct. 15. 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 -2 Ilflillllllllllllflllll! Illllflliilllllllflil forate member 20 is secured to 3,023,447 WALL-INSTALLED VACUUM CLEANER Edgar P. Senne, R0. Box 30, Hempstead, N.Y. Filed Oct. 15, 1958, Ser. N0. 767,372 Claims. (Cl. 15-314) This invention relates to vacuum cleaners and more particularly to a wall-installed cleaner which may be utilized to provide cleaning service for adjacent rooms.

Principal objects and features of the invention are the provision of an inexpensive vacuum cleaner that may be located and stored in a wall recess and utilized directly from such location and without requiring removal therefrom, thus eliminating the need for expensive decorative trim and hazards of damage to the cleaner and at the same time eliminating need for providing separate storage space for the cleaner.

Further objects and features of the invention are the provisions of a cleaner of this type that may be utilized to provide cleaning service for adjoining rooms on the same floor as well as rooms above or below such floor, if desired.

Still another object and features of the invention are the provision of a cleaner of this type that may be utilized independently as a portable unit by simple removal from its wall storage recess and which also may be repaired readily upon such removal.

Additional objects and features of the invention are the provision of a wall positioned cleaner whose dirt bag may readily be removed and emptied or replaced when full, and wherein signalling means, to indicate a dirt-filled bag, are provided.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following specification and the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a broken away elevational view illustrating a wall-recess-installed vacuum cleaner embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a section taken along the plane of line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of the bag mounting mechanism utilized in the arrangement;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a modified installation;

FIG. 5 is a similar sectional view of a further modification of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a circuit diagram utilizable with all modifications; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the modification used as a portable device.

Referring to the drawings and first to FIGURES 1, 2 and 3, the reference character It generally denotes a vacuum cleaning device which, with its casing C, is removably positioned within an aperture or recess 11 provided within a wall 12 between a pair of rooms. The device includes in the casing C a conventional motor 13 which is equipped with a conventional suction fan (not shown) adapted to draw air through an appropriate opening at the upper end of the motor 13 and to vent it outwardly adjacent the lower end of the motor 13.

The motor 13 is mounted by bolts 14 on an apron 15 which serves as a front for the casing C and also to close otf the wall opening of the chamber 11. The apron 15 is secured to the wall as by removable screws 16 over the opening of said chamber 11 and may be detached by removal of the screws so that the motor 13 in casing C may be removed from recess 11 as desired for repair.

An access door 17 is hingedly supported at 18 preferably along its upper edge from the apron 15 to form a cover for an access opening 19 in said apron 15. A perthe inside of the door in spaced relationship therewith. This member 20 forms States PatentU louvers 41 to provide a return the cleaner 10. If desired, hose (not shown) may be one side of a perforated bag receiver box 21 within which a dirt or dust accumulating bag 22 is positioned.

As seen in FIGURE 3, the upper end of the bag 22 is provided with a plate like cover 23 which is slidably insertable into guide rails 24 which are secured to and extend laterally from the member 20. An opening 25 is provided in cover 23 for purposes presently to be specifled. A keeper frame 26 is secured to one edge of the cover 23 and has legs 27 that are movable slidably on the rails 24. This frame 26 and its legs serve to retain the cover 23 within rails 24 and thereby to support the bag '22 in the receiver 21. Springs 28 bias the frame 26 into bag retaining position. A handle 29 serves to facilitate sliding withdrawal of frame 26 and removal of cover 23 and bag 22 for replacement. The rails 24 which are secured to perforated member 20 and the door 17 swing With the latter about the hinge 18 when the door is opened, moving them from the full line position of FIG. 2 wherein the bag cover 23 is at the top of the bag to the dotted position wherein the cover 23 lies at the bottom. In the latter position, the handle 29 may be operated to remove the cover 23 and with it the bag 22 from rails 24 for replacement by a new or an emptied bag. Upon closure of door 17, i.e. restoration to full line position, the new bag '22 is positioned within receiver 21 and cover 23 again lies at its top.

The opening 25 of lid or cover 23 then receives a spout 30 which extends laterally from a conduit 31, a suitable resilient gasket 32 on the spout 30 serving to engage the surface of cover 23 and provide a seal for the spout around said opening 25.

The conduit 31 spans the space between outer surfaces of the wall 12 between the room terminating in an enlarged socket 50 at each end opening into the respective rooms. Hinged, spring-biased covers 33 serve normally to close off the open ends of said sockets 50, gaskets 34 of resilient material providing seals for the covers in their closed positions.

Each socket 50 serves to receive an end of a conventional hose 35 to which usual suction cleaning tools (not shown) may be attached. The sockets 50' are provided with bayonet slots 36 to receive appropriate bayonet pins (not shown) provided on the hose ends intended to be coupled thereto.

A conventional, normally open micro-switch 37 is positioned in each socket 50. Each such switch is operable to circuit-closing condition by insertion of a hose end in the corresponding socket 50. All such switches 37 are in electrical parallel connection and the parallel circuit of these switches 37 is in series with the main on and ofi switch 38 (FIGURE 6). Power to the motor 13 requires closure of the main switch 38 and at least one of the micro-switches 37 to run the motor. This prevents useless running of the motor unless at least one suction hose 35 is connected in a socket 50 for use. 7

An additional extension conduit 39 may, if a non-removable installation is desired, be connected to the conduit 31 for communication with an appropriate outlet '(not shown) in a wall of another room other than that of the rooms of wall 12. More than one such extension may be provided, if desired.

An outlet 40 in the apron 15 is covered by adjustable to the room of air from mounted in the outlet 40 to provide a blower for spraying of paints, insecticides or other fluids.

In the modified embodiment shown in FIGURE 4, the

access door 17a is hinged at 18a to the apron 15a along the lower door edge.

Door 17a is swingable from a closed position over the apron opening to a substantially horizontal position as shown in dot-dash line. The perreplacement.

forated bag-receiving member 21a is in the form of a container having a sloping upper edge. This member 21a is slidable horizontally into and out of the chamber 11a on guide rails 41, being movable when the door 17a is open, from the full line position to the dot-dash line position shown. The sloping upper rim or edge of the container 21a serves to mount guide rails (not shown), cover 23a and keeper frame 261: in a sloping condition so that when the bag 22a is mounted in container 21a and the latter is moved from its dot-dash to its full line position, the spout 39a will enter opening 25a and be sealed by gasket 32a. Upon movement of container 21a to the dot-dash line position, the keeper frame 26a may be slid open and a dirt full bag removed for replacement by a fresh or empty bag.

All other parts depicted in FIG. 4 and marked by reference characters with subscripts a correspond substantially with similarly marked parts bearing no subscripts in FIGS. 1 to '3 inclusive.

In the further embodiment shown in FIGURE 5, the bag container 21b is independently hinged at 42 to the apron 15b so that when access door 171: which is hinged at 18b to said apron is swung to the open position shown, the container 211; may be swung on hinge 42 to the dotdash position for removal of bag 22!) for emptying or All other parts depicted in FIGURE and marked by reference characters with subscripts b correspond substantially with similarly marked parts without subscripts in FIGURES 1 to 3 inclusive.

In the figures, the respective access doors 17, 17a and 17b are secured in closed condition as by respective latches 43, 43a and 43b.

A signal lamp 44 is connected in series with a thermally responsive switch 45 which may be connected across the input terminals of the motor 13. The switch 45 is responsive to motor temperature and is adjusted to close above a selected temperature of the motor. Motor temperature rises with increased load caused by progressive filling of the bag 22 with dirt. When full, motor load is at its maximum and the temperatures of the motor at that time become high enough to close switch 45 and cause lamp 44 to glow. This signals the user to empty or to replace the bag.

As seen diagrammatically in FIG. 7, the wall mounted casing C bearing the cleaner may be removed as a unit from the wall recess and carried by a handle 46. In this case the optional conduit 39 is omitted. A hose may then be connected over the bag cover opening 25. Then, the motor may be connected to power by appropriate conduits 47 and moved about on casters 48.

In operation, whenever it is desired to use the cleaner in a room, the socket cover 33, 33a or 33b opening into the room to be cleaned is lifted and an end of a hose 35 mounted in the socket. The required cleaning device is attached to the hose. Assuming that switch 38 is in its usually closed position, insertion of a hose in a socket 32 closes its associated switch 37 and starts the motor 13. This provides suction at the cleaning end of the hose because air is drawn into it carrying dirt with it via the hose, conduit 31 and spout 30 into bag 22. The

dirt is retained in the latter while the air continues through the walls of bag 22 and perforations in member 21 and down through the motor face and out through the bottom of the motor finally exhausting via louvres 41 and opening 40 back into the room.

As the bag fills up, less air can pass through the motor causing it to heat up. This warms the thermally responsive switch 45 to cause itss closing and thus, the lighting of the lamp 44 serves to indicate the need for emptying or replacement of bag 22. The lamp 44 may be replaced by a latch release mechanism which will then operate to release position and cause access doors 17, 17a or 1712 to open and expose the dirt bag to view for replacement.

When the bag is filled, it is removed from recess 11 and removed for emptying or replacement in the manner described as regards the modifications of the various figures.

If it is desired to utilize the cleaner in other rooms it may be removed as a unit from the wall recess and carried by handle 46 and casters 48 to the point of use.

While specific embodiments of the invention have been disclosed, variations within the scope of these claims are possible and are contemplated. There is no intention, therefore, of limitations to the exact details shown and described.

What is claimed is:

1. For use in combination with a building wall having a recess, a vacuum cleaner assembly comprising a casing positionable within said recess, an apron for the casing securable to said wall about said recess to conceal and retain said casing therein, said apron having an access opening, an access door for said opening, a suction fan unit mounted within said casing and supported by said apron, said fan unit having an air intake and an air exhaust, said apron having a room air return outlet in proximity to said air exhaust, an air intake conduit for said casing supported by and opening through said apron, a socket forming part of said conduit and adapted to receive a hose, means normally positioned within the casing adjacent said access opening for the attachment and support of a dirt collecting bag, means positioned within the casing to connect said intake conduit to said dirt bag, the air intake of said fan unit being so positioned within the casing as to cause air to be drawn through said bag while the fan unit is electrically energized, signaling means for indicating a dirt filled bag, and electric circuit closing means associated with said socket for delivering electric power to said fan unit When a hose is inserted in said socket.

2. For use in combination with a building wall having a recess, a vacuum cleaner assembly comprising a casing adapted to fit within said recess and to be secured therein, a front apron for the casing adapted to serve as a closure therefor, at least a portion of the apron being secured to said casing and movable relative thereto to permit access to the interior of the casing, a suction fan unit mounted within the casing, said fan unit having a suction opening .and an air exhaust, said apron having a room air return outlet in proximity to said air exhaust, an air intake conduit for said casing supported by the casing and terminating in an exposed hose-receiving socket, a spout communicating within the casing with said air intake conduit and adapted to register with the opening of a dirt collecting bag, and means normally positioned within the casing adjacent the movable portion of the apron for the attachment and support of a dirt collecting bag with its opening in register with said spout and its outer surface presented towards the suction opening of the fan unit.

3. For use in combination with a building wall having a recess, a vacuum cleaner assembly comprising a casing adapted to fit within said recess and to be secured therein, a front apron for the casing adapted to serve as a closure therefor, at least a portion of the apron being secured to said casing and movable relative thereto to permit access to the interior of the casing, a suction fan unit mounted within the casing, said fan unit having a suction opening and an air exhaust, said apron having a room air return outlet in proximity to said air exhaust, an air intake conduit for said casing supported by the casing and terminating in an exposed hose-receiving socket, a spout communicating within the casing with said air intake conduit and adapted to register with the opening of a dirt collecting bag, means normally positioned within the casing adjacent the movable portion of the apron for the attachment and support of a dirt collecting bag with its opening in register with said spout and its outer surface presented towards the suction opening of the fan unit, and electric circuit closing means associated with said socket for delivering electric power to said fan unit when a hose is inserted in the socket.

4. A vacuum cleaner assembly as set forth in claim 2 including signaling means for indicating a dirt filled bag.

5. A vacuum cleaner assembly as set forth in claim 3 including signaling means for indicating a dirt filled bag.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 Replogle Aug. 21, 1928 Traux Mar. 10, 1931 Liedtke 'Feb. 18, 1936 Skinner June 23, 1936 Curtis Oct. 12, 1943 Devan Jan. 20, 1953 Kent Aug. 16, 1955 Stoicos Mar. 10, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS Australia Oct. 18, 1939 Great Britain June 7, 1934 France May 27, 1929

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3213480 *Apr 27, 1964Oct 26, 1965Miller Rhys DWall mounted clothes cleaning vacuum appliance
US3238706 *Aug 14, 1962Mar 8, 1966Hoover CoSuction cleaners
US3339347 *Oct 5, 1965Sep 5, 1967Jr Herbert R OttoFilter
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/314, 55/378, 15/328, 15/339, 55/478
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/38
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/38
European ClassificationA47L5/38