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Publication numberUS3023587 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1962
Filing dateApr 7, 1958
Priority dateApr 7, 1958
Publication numberUS 3023587 A, US 3023587A, US-A-3023587, US3023587 A, US3023587A
InventorsAlbert A Robbins
Original AssigneeKwik Kold Of America Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chemical cooling stick for beverages
US 3023587 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1962 A. A. ROBBINS CHEMICAL COOLING STICK FOR BEVERAGES Filed April '7, 1958 INVENTOR. 445z74 foxes/w, .BY

ire tires att 3,023,587 CIEMICAL COOLKNG STICK FOR BEVERAGES Albert A. Robbins, West Covina, Califi, assignor to Kwik- Kold of America, Inc., Las Vegas, Nev., a corporation of Nevada Filed Apr. 7, 195a, Ser. No. 726,794 3 Claims. (Cl. 62-4) This invention relates to a chemical cooling stick for beverages whereby a beverage may be quickly cooled by means of a chemical cooling package attached to a stirring stick, the cooling stick being activated at the time that the beverage is to be cooled, and this chemical cooling package on the stick will remain at a low temperature for a considerable period of time. This. invention is an improvement on my co-pending applications: Serial No. 582,748, now Patent 2,907,173; Serial No. 591,757, now Patent No. 2,882,691; Serial No. 591,758, now Patent No. 2,898,744; Serial No. 603,059, now abandoned; Serial No. 624,097, now Patent No. 2,882,692; Serial No. 624,098, now Patent No. 2,916,886; and Serial No. 624,142, now abandoned.

An object of my invention is to provide a novel chemical cooling stick for beverages consisting of an outer envelope which is attached to a stirring stick and which also contains a crystalline freezing compound; this outer envelope also containing another envelope therein which contains a fluid which cooperates with the crystalline cooling chemical, and which may be readily broken or torn for the purpose of permitting the liquid or fluid ma-- terial to admix with the dry crystalline chemical.

Still another object of my invention is to treat the inner bag so that the film composing the bag is weakened and will readily burst or tear under pressure to permit the fluid or fluid chemical to readily adrnix with the dry crystalline chemical, thus providing a reduced temperature within the outer bag.

A feature of my invention resides in the manner in which the dry crystalline chemical may be compressed into a block or pencil-like structure to reduce the area occupied by the chemical within the outer bag, and also to materially stiffen the bag so that it may be readily used as a stirring implement for the beverage.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention may appear from the accompanying drawing, the subjoined detailed description and the appended claims.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a glass in which my chemical cooling stick is placed.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevation of my chemical cooling stick for beverages.

FIGURE 3 is a side elevation of the chemical cooling stick with parts broken away to show interior construction.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

It is well known in the chemical art that certain chemicals absorb heat when water is added thereto, this heat being obtained from adjacent bodies by means of conduction, convection or radiation, or perhaps all three. These so-called freezing mixtures, which will hereinafter be thus termed, consist of any of the following chemicals, or many others having this same property. These freezing mixtures have the following formulae:

Na CO 1 NH CI Na SO c301, NH4NO3 The dry chemical in the chemical cooling stick preferably consists of ammonium nitrate (NH NO or a similar freezing compound or product of heat absorbing salt or salts when water or some hydrous material is added thereto. The liquid product may be either plain water or it may be a solution of sodium carbonate (Na OO .1OH O).

The chemical cooling stick for beverages consists of a rigid tube or stick 1 of suflicient length to insert into a suitable beverage glass 2, and which is used for the purpose of stirring the beverage therein. An outer bag 3 is formed of a flexible plastic sheet material, such as polyethylene, although other plastic materials may be used, such as vinyl or acetate. This plastic sheet material is very flexible and can be bent, folded, creased, or otherwise manipulated without breaking, cracking, or injuring that sheet material in any manner. The outer envelope 3 is formed by hermetically sealing all four edges 4 thereof by suitable means, such as heat and adhesive or similar means. One vertical edge 5 of the en velope may be somewhat greater in width and is fixedly attached to the stick 1 by appropriate means, such as the staples 6. The lower portion of the envelope 3 is filled with a dry chemical freezing compound 7, such as ammonium nitrate (NH NO This dry or soluble salt mixture or crystalline freezing compound may be tightly compressed or extruded to form a relatively thin pencil-like structure which will be sufliciently rigid, and will support or reinforce the outer bag 3 so that the bag itself will become quite rigid and may be used as a stirring means for the beverage which are without the attached stick 1. In other words, the bag 3 may be sufliciently rigid in itself so that the stick 1 may be eliminated and the bag itself used as the stirring means for the beverage. A second bag 8 is positioned within the outer bag 3 and is a substantially close fit within the bag 3, that is, there is a very small space between the wall of the bag 8 and the inner surface of the bag 3. The inner bag 8 is also formed of a thin plastic sheet material, such as polyethylene, vinyl or acetate, and is also very flexible and can be bent, folded or creased under normal usage or packaging without breaking the sheet material. The bag 8 is completely filled with a fluid, such as a solution of sodium carbonate (Na CO .10H O). The envelope 8 is formed in substantially the same manner as the outer bag 3, in that the edges 9 thereof are hermetically sealed by suitable means, such as heat, an adhesive, or similar means.

It is desirable that when pressure is applied to the bag 8 that the lower portion thereof shall be ruptured, thus depositing the fluid directly onto the dry crystalline chemical compound, and to insure that the bag 8' will be ruptured at the proper place when pressure is applied thereto 1 weaken or reduce the thickness of the plastic film by treating the lower portion of the bag 8, or any portion thereof which might be desired, with a solvent for the plastic of which the bag is made. If the bag is made of polyethylene the solvent may be parafiin, parafiin oil, as well as benzine, xylene, toluene, trichlorethylene, carbon tetrachloride, chlorobenzine, petroleum ether, tetrohvdronaphthalene, turpentine, etc. If poly iso butylene is added to or incorporated in various proportions with the polyethylene film then the solvent will work at room temperature, that is, around to F. The plasticizer for the solvent of polyethylene film is poly iso butylene. The temperature at which the polyethylene bag will be weakened by the solvent varies with the amount of poly iso butylene which is added to the solvent and to the plasticizer. If the inner bag 8 is formed of polyethylene film and positioned within the outer bag 3, the use of poly iso butylene incorporated in the film or dissolved in any one of the solvents mentioned above and placed in one or several spots on the bag 8 will so weaken the film forming the wall of the bag in these spots so that the bag will readily burst under pressure. The weakening of the wall of the film is confined to the area so spotted or covered with the solvent and the poly iso butylene and does not elfect other areas of thefilm which has not been touched, sprayed or dipped in the solvent and the plasticizer. Thus when pressure is applied to the outer bag 3 the inner bag 8 will be ruptured, causing the contents of the bag 8 to mix with the contents of the bag: 3. The weakening of the inner bag 8, as described above, is desirable in the present structure due to the fact that: the bag 8 closely approximates the inside diameter of the bag 3, thus restricting the required expansion of the bag 8 when pressure is exerted thereon and prior to the time that the bag 8 will burst. With the weakened spotsor area of the bag 8 this bag can be broken, burst or ruptured, particularly at the lower end thereof, so that the fluid or hydrous contents of this bag will flow out and mix with the crystals in the bag 3. In my cooling stick it is necessary that the inner bag 8 may be ruptured by pressure of the fingers, or by simply squeezing the outer bag and thus causing pressure on the inner bag 8. To increase the solvency of poly iso butylene a small quantity of oxidized linseed oil can be added theretobefore the poly iso butylene is added to the solvent and before application to the polyethylene film, or incorpo- :rated with the film.

Other films may be used instead of polyethylene, such as the cellulose types which are soluble in ethanol, butyl acetate, amyl acetate, etc., without the use of poly iso butylene. Also the vinyl types of film soluble in butyl acetate, amyl acetate, etc. That is, the various plastic films have their particular plasticizers and solvents which are well known and which can be used to weaken the particular film a sufiicient amount so that the inner bag will readily rupture without breaking or injuring the outer bag which remains intact after pressure and retains the cold producing elements therein.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A chemical cooling stick for beverages comprising an outer envelope, all the edges of said envelope being hermetically sealed to prevent escape of any material therefrom, said outer envelope being formed of a thin flexible plastic sheet material, a bag within said outer envelope, said bag being substantially the same diameter as the outer envelope and of lesser length than the outer envelope and positioned at the upper end of said outer envelope, said bag being formed of a thin flexible plastic sheet material, said outer envelope containing a dry freezging chemical mixture, said bag containing a hydrous substance, the hydrous substance filtering down through the dry freezing chemical mixture after rupture of said bag, a stirring stick, and means securing one edge of the outer envelope to said stirring stick.

2. A chemical cooling stick for beverages comprising an outer envelope, all of the edges of said envelope being hermetically sealed to prevent escape of any material therefrom, said outer envelope being formed of a thin flexible plastic sheet material, a bag within said outer envelope, said bag being substantially the same diameter as the outer envelope and of lesser length than the outer envelope and positioned at the upper end of said outer envelope, said bag being formed of a thin flexible plastic sheet material, said outer envelope containing a dry freezing chemical mixture, said bag containing a hydrous substance, the hydrous substance filtering down through the dry freezing chemical mixture after rupture of said bag, a portion of the Wall of said bag being thinner than the remaining portion of the bag whereby said bag will rupture under pressure without breaking the outer envelope, a stirring stick, and means securing one edge of the outer envelope to said stirring stick.

3. A chemical cooling stick for beverages comprising an outer envelope, all of the edges of said envelope being hermetically sealed to prevent escape of any material therefrom, said outer envelope being formed of a thin flexible plastic sheet material, a bag within said outer envelope, said bag being substantially the same diameter as the outer envelope and of lesser length than the outer envelope, said bag being formed of a thin flexible plastic sheet material, said bag completely occupying the upper end of the outer envelope, said outer envelope containing a dry freezing chemical mixture in the end thereof not occupied by the bag, said bag containing a hydrous substance adapted to mix with the dry freezing chemical mixture upon breaking of the bag, the hydrous substance filtering down through the dry freezing chemical mixture after rupture of said bag, a stirring stick, and means securikng one edge of the outer envelope to said stirring strc References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,897,723 Free Feb. 14, 1933 2,120,201 Fisk Jan. 16, 1937 2,340,037 Zipper Ian. 25, 1944 2,615,037 Cohen Oct. 28, 1952 2,687,130 Cohen Aug. 24, 1954 2,714,974 Sawyer Aug. 9, 1955 2,746,265 Mills May 22, 1956 2,882,691 Robbins Apr. 21, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS .l,054,170 France Oct. 7, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1897723 *Apr 29, 1927Feb 14, 1933Free Walter HRefrigerating device
US2120201 *Jan 16, 1937Jun 7, 1938Fisk & Fisk IncCombination liquid cooler and stirrer
US2340037 *Sep 8, 1941Jan 25, 1944Zipper Alfred IrvingCapsule
US2615037 *Oct 15, 1948Oct 21, 1952Dow Chemical CoO,o-di(4-chlorophenyl) n-alkylamidothiophosphates
US2687130 *Jan 13, 1950Aug 24, 1954Cohen Milton JMedicament and container therefor
US2714974 *Oct 24, 1949Aug 9, 1955Sawyer John WCompartmented container for liquids
US2746265 *Jan 7, 1955May 22, 1956Evan D MillsContainer cooling device
US2882691 *Jun 15, 1956Apr 21, 1959Kwik Kold Of America IncBeverage cooling means
FR1054170A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4750615 *Jul 1, 1986Jun 14, 1988Intecser S.A.Apparatus to maintain separate until the moment of use, two different substances within a container, particularly two-component resins
US7175614Oct 17, 2002Feb 13, 2007Baxter International Inc.Peelable seal
US7678097Nov 12, 1999Mar 16, 2010Baxter International Inc.Containers and methods for manufacturing same
US7770611Oct 26, 2006Aug 10, 2010Baxter International Inc.Peelable seal closure assembly
US8172454Feb 12, 2009May 8, 2012David ChoiCooling stick for a blender and method of using same
US8388217Mar 23, 2012Mar 5, 2013David ChoiCooling stick for a blender and method of using same
WO2010068112A1 *Dec 8, 2009Jun 17, 2010Emtech AsStirrer
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/4, 62/430, 206/219, D07/300.2, 126/263.7
International ClassificationF25D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2331/808, F25D5/02
European ClassificationF25D5/02