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Publication numberUS3023919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1962
Filing dateFeb 15, 1960
Priority dateFeb 15, 1960
Publication numberUS 3023919 A, US 3023919A, US-A-3023919, US3023919 A, US3023919A
InventorsHobson Lloyd L
Original AssigneeHobson Lloyd L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lift truck attachment
US 3023919 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1962 L. HOBSON 3,023,919

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT Filed Feb. 15, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. LLOYD L. HOBSON BY MBM A TTORNEY Ma c 5, 196 1.. HOBSON 3,023,919

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT INVENTOR. LLOYD L. HOBSON ATTORNEY March 6, 1962 HOBSON 3,023,919

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT Filed Feb. 15, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN V EN TOR.

LLOYD L. HOBSON E 15 5 BY MBM A TTORNE Y March 6, 1962 L. L. HOBSON 3,023,919

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT Filed Feb. 15, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 3) I33) ll ELIE-'5 INVENTOR.

LLOYD L. uossom E l E B BY M 5. 56m! A TTORNEY March 6, 1962 L. HOBSON 3,023,919

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT Filed Feb. 15, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 .IIHIIIH'I/AW/ll mmnmunum LLOYD L. HOBSON MZM ATTORNEY IN V EN TOR.

March 6, 1962 L. HOBSON 3,023,919

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT Filed Feb. 15, 1960 e Sheets-Sheet e {fit/'37 III I I 60 l T I 1' 'l I 60 n 55 26 r. j i -m 35 205 EIE .l. 3

IN V EN TOR.

LLOYD L. HOBSON BY MBM ATTORNEY United States 3,023,919 LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT Lloyd L. Hobson, Elnora, Ind. Filed Feb. 15, 1960, Ser. No. 8,752 15 Ciaims. (Cl. 214620) The present invention relates to an improvement in lift trucks, to an attachment for a lift truck which facilitates the handling of boxes, crates, rectangular-drum type cartons and other objects, and to certain sub-combinations of said attachment.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved lift truck.

Another object of the invention is to provide a lift truck capable of handling objects with or without a pair of lift forks, the lift forks of the truck being pivotal out of a forwardly projecting, load engaging position to provide for easy maneuverability of the lift truck.

A further object of the invention is to provide, for a lift truck, an attachment providing an easily used mount for a plurality of selectively-usable lifting means, namely, a plate for engaging an upper, sideward component of an object, a plurality of fingers for engaging an upper, sideward component of an object, and a pair of lift forks normally used in lifting pallets upon which an object or objects are carried.

Still another object of the invention is to provide novel means for supporting the base of a box or other object being lifted by the above-mentioned plate or fingers. it being frequently the case that a box is more strongly constructed at its base than at certain other portions of the box.

A further object is to provide a means for aligning a first object with a second object when the first object is lifed and stacked upon the second object, using any of the above-mentioned lifting means.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide, for a lift truck, an attachment, the capacity of which can be easily and quickly changed to carry a pair of side-by-side boxes or other objects and, if desired, to carry further boxes or other objects stacked upon the side-by-side boxes or other objects.

Another object of the invention is to provide novel apparatus for mounting attachments on a lift truck whereby the attachments may be secured to the lift truck by hand, easily and Withoutthe use of tools.

Still a further obiect of the invention is to provide an attachment for a lift truck including a pair of pivotally mounted lift forks which may be easily and conveniently adjusted to compensate for springing of the lift forks.

Still further objects of the invention will appear as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the above and related objects. my invention may be embodied in the form illustrated in the accompanying drawings, attention being called to the fact, however, that the drawings are illustrative only, and that change may be made in the specific constructions illustrated and described. so long as the scope of the appended claims is not violated.

FIG. 1 is a perspective View of a lift truck having my novel attachment mounted on the elevator mechanism thereof and with certain accessories, also forming a portion of the present invention, mounted upon the attachment;

FIG. 1A is a side view of the lift truck and attachment of FIG. 1 showing the parts in a different relationship and showing the attachment without certain of the accessories of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a somewhat enlarged front elevation of the attachment of FIG. 1 showing certain of the accessories mentioned with regard to FIG. 1 in different positions upon the attachment;

3,623,919 Patented Mar. 6, 1952 FIG. 3 is a somewhat enlarged side elevation of the attachment of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged section taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2 in the direction of the arrows and showing'the details of mounting of a lift fork shown in a load-engaging, forwardly projecting position;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged detail view or elevation of an accessory comprising a plurality of fingers and a mounting member for the fingers, said fingers and mounting member forming a portion of the apparatus referred to with regard to FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary rear elevation of the accessory of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged section taken along the line 77 of FIG. 6 in the direction of the arrows and showing certain details of structure and mounting of a representative one of the plurality of fingers illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6;

FIG. 8 is a similarly enlarged section taken along the line 88 of FIG. 5 in the direction of the arrows and showing, in addition to the subject matter of FIGS. 5-7, a portion of a frame which forms a portion of the attachment of FIGS. 1 through 3, the accessory of FIGS. 5-7 being shown mounted upon the frame;

FIG. 9 is a section taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 8 in the direction of the arrows and showing further details of the mounting of the finger accessory upon the frame;

FIG. 10 is an. enlarged section taken along the line 1tl10 of FIG. 2 in the direction of the arrows and showing a lifing plate, forming a portion of the apparatus mentioned in FIG. 1 and showing the details of mounting of the plate upon the frame;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary rear elevation of the portion of the frame adjacent the lifting plate of FIG. 10 showing certain further details of the mounting of the lifting plate upon the frame;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary perspective view of a portion of the attachment as illustrated in FIG. 1 showing the details of mounting of an extension plate forming one of the accessories men ioned with regard to FIG. l; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevation of the attachment with the lifting plate mounted thereon and shows the attachment being used to stack a box upon another box and to vertically align the boxes.

Referring now to the drawings, and more especially to FIGS. 1 and 1A, a lift truck 20 is shown having an elevator mechanism 21 mounted on the forward end thereof and a stop member 22 carried by the lift truck generally below and forwardly of the elevator mechanism 21 for preventing an object carried by the elevator mechanism from dropping to a surface upon which the truck operates. As is conventional in many present day lift trucks, the elevator mechanism is shown as including a mast 23 which is tiltable forwardly and backwardly about a horizontal axis for changing the attitude of an object carried by the lift truck.

My novel attachment comprises a frame, indicated generally by the reference numeral 24 and an abutment element, indicated generally by the numeral 25, mounted upon the frame 24 in such a manner that the frame and the element are vertically movable with respect to one another. In FIG. 1A the abutment element 25 is shown at the lowest limit of its travel with respect to the frame 24; however, the abutment element is so proportioned and arranged that, when the frame is lowered by the elevator mechanism 21, the abutment element engages the stop member 22 so that the abutment element is prevented from dropping to the surface upon which the truck operates.

A variety of accessories, which will be further described below, are shown in FIG. I mounted upon the attachment, namely, a pair of lifting forks 26-26 pivotally mounted upon the lower end of the frame 24, a pair of lifting plates 27-27 removably mounted upon the frame 24, a plurality of sets of fingers 39-30 also removably mounted upon the frame 24 and a pair of extension plates 31-31 removabiy fixed to the lateral edges 32-32 of the abutment element 25.

Referring, now, also to FIGS. 2 and 3, the frame 24 comprises three vertical channels 35, 36 and 37 which are fixed in a spaced parallel relationship, with their flanges projecting forwardly, by means of horizontal channels 40 and 41 (which, as shown, are closed at their opposite ends) and by means of a horizontal bar 42 fixed to the lower ends of the vertical channels 35, 36 and 37 by a plurality of connecting members 45-45 (only one of which is shown). A pair of vertical bars -50, having vertical reinforcing members 51-51 (only one of which is shown) fixed to their forward faces, are fixed directly at their lower ends to the horizontal bar 42 and are connected fixedly at their upper end by means of four connecting members 52-52 (only one of which is shown) to the horizontal channel 41.

Each one of a pair of vertical bars 55-55 (only one of which is shown) is fixed to the rearward face of one of the vertical bars 50 and a plurality of mount members 56-56 are fixed to the vertical bars 55 which, with a plurality of screws 57-57 and suitably apertured blocks 60-60, provide means for mounting the frame 24 upon the upwardly and downwardly movable portion of the elevator mechanism of the lift truck. The exact location and proportions of the mount members 56, screws 57, and blocks 60 will be determined by the particular lift truck upon which the attachment is used and the location and proportion of those illustrated in the drawings are intended only as an example.

On each of the vertical channels 35, 36 and 37, there is provided a group of keyhole shaped apertures 61-61, 62-62 or 63-63, the apertures in each group being equally spaced, one above the other. The apertures 61, 62 and 63, which have their larger ends upward and their smaller ends downward, are used, as will be explained in detail below, for mounting the lifting plates 27 and the fingers 3!} upon the frame 24.

The abutment element 25 comprises two pairs of channel shaped members -70 and 71-71 which are fixed in a spaced parallel relationship by means of horizontal bars 72 and 75, the horizontal bar 72 being fixed directly to the channels 76 and '71 and the horizontal bar 75 being fixed to the channels 79 and 71 by means of connecting plates 76-76 and reinforcing angles 77-77 (only one of which is shown). The horizontal bar 75 is spaced a sufficient distance rearwardly of the remainder of the abutment element 25 so that the stop member 22 is in the path of the abutment element preventing it, when the frame is in a downward position, from dropping to the surface upon which the lift truck is operated.

The channel shaped members 79 and 71, respectively, have their flanges projecting toward one another and are spaced for reception therebetween of the frame channels 35 and 37, respectively, whereby the abutment element 25 is reciprocably mounted upon the frame 24. The lower limit of travel of the frame with respect to the abutment element is determined by the engagement of the horizontal channel 41 with the upward ends of the channel shaped members 70 and 71. The upward limit of travel of the frame with respect to the abutment element is determined by engagement of connecting members 45 and forwardly projecting members 80-80, which extend from the horizontal bar 42 of the frame and are also fixed to and supported by the vertical bars 50, with the horizontal bar 72 of the abutment element 25. Further upward movement of the frame after such engagement causes the abutment element 25 to move upwardly with the frame.

A pair of vertical channels 81-81 having their flanges projecting rearwardly form a further portion of the abutment element 25 and are fixedly connected near their upper ends to the horizontal bar 72 by means of short connecting members (not shown) and are fixedly connected at their lower ends to the horizontal bar 75 by means of connecting plates 82-82 so that their Webs are disposed slightly ahead of the edges of the flanges of the upright channel 36. On each of the vertical channels 81 there is provided three keyhole shaped apertures 85-85, the apertures in each group of three being equally spaced, one above the other. The apertures 85, which have their larger ends upward and their smaller ends downward, are used, as will be explained in detail below, for mounting the lifting plates 27 upon the abutment element 25.

It should be noted that the forwardly facing portions of the abutment element 25 and specifically of the channel shaped members 70 and 71 and the vertical channels 81 are positioned in a vertical plane spaced forwardly of the lower portion of the frame 24. Thus, when the lower portion of the frame is moved toward the surface of a box, the box surface will engage the forwardly facing portions of the abutment element 25 rather than the lower portion of the frame. The forwardly facing portions of the upper portion of the frame and specifically of the upper portions of the channels 35, 36 and 37 are located in approximately the same plane as the forwardly facing portions of the abutment element 25, the channels 35, 36 and 37 being cut back all along their lower portions as at 86 (FIG. 3). Thus, when the lift forks 26 are used to handle an object, the frame and abutment element together provide substantially a fiat surface against which the object may be supported.

Referring now additionally to FIGS. 10 and 11, a representative one of the plates 27, which has a generally rectangular shape with one straight edge facing upwardly, is shown as being fixed to a guide member 90 having, at its upward end an upwardly and rearwardly inclined guiding portion 21. The guide member 90, which is reinforced in its attachment to the plate 27 by means of a horizontal bar 92, is fixed at its rearward surface to a box-like mount device having a forwardly projecting lower portion 96 which is connected to the rearward face of the plate 27 to provide added support for the plate. The box-like device 95 is pivotally secured to a U-shaped element 97 by means of a vertical shaft 109 which is fixed to the legs 99-99 of the U-shaped element and extends through suitable apertures in the box-like device 95. The proportions of the box-like device and the U-shaped element are such that the box-like element and the members secured thereto are only limitedly pivotal with respect to the U-shaped element, the swinging movement of the box-like element with respect to the U-shaped member being limited by the engagement of an upper portion 98 and the lower portion 96 of the box-like element with the base 101 of the U-shaped element 97.

A pair of studs 102-192 are fixed to the base 101 of the U-shaped element and project rearwardly from the rearward face of the base 101 and have enlarged heads -105 and reduced diameter shanks 194-164. The studs 102 are spaced an equal distance to the spacing in each group of the apertures 61, 62, 63 and 85 and the larger ends of these apertures are sufiiciently large to admit the enlarged heads of the studs 102. The smaller ends of the apertures 61, 62, 63 and 55 are of a size such that they can receive the shanks 104 of the studs 102 but will retain the enlarged heads of the studs. Thus, the plate 27 may be mounted upon the frame 24 by inserting the enlarged beads 195 through the larger ends of any adjacent two of the apertures 6-1, any adjacent two of the apertures 62, or any adjacent two of the apertures 63 and by allowing the studs to move downwardly within the apertures; and may be mounted upon the abutment element 25 by using the apertures 85 in the same manner.

A bolt 186 is reciprocably mounted within a collar 167 which is fixed to the upper surface of the U-shaped ele ment 97. The bolt 106 is positioned adjacent the upper one of the studs 102 and is movable to a position in which, when the enlarged heads of the studs are received in the smaller ends of a pair of apertures, the bolt projects into the larger end of the upper one of the apertures. A spring 110 is received within the collar 107 and acts between the collar and the bolt 1% to urge the bolt into said position. A small handle 111 is fixed to the bolt 1116 and may be operated so as to retract the bolt from the above-mentioned position. Thus, the plate may be mounted as above described, moving the studs into the desired apertures and moving the studs downwardly therein, but at the same time, either holding the bolt 106 in a retracted position or forcing it into a retracted position by means of the portion of the frame or abutment element adjacent to the upper aperture of the two apertures within which the studs are being received. Once the studs have been moved downwardly within the aperture a sufiicient distance so as to allow the bolt to be projected into its above mentioned position, the bolt will prevent upward movement of the studs and will securely retain the studs within the apertures. If desired, the plate may be easily dismounted by retracting the bolt and moving the studs upwardly and out of the apertures. The proportions of the above-described mounting means for the plate 27 are such that, when the plate is mounted upon the frame at any of the apertures 61, 62 or 63, the plate is arranged in a plane which is located forwardly of the plane within which the forward portions of the abutment element 25 are arranged.

Referring now to FIGS. through 9 a representative one of a pair of mounting devices 125-125 (FIG. 1) for the fingers 3G is illustrated and comprises a plate 126 having a pair of rectangular apertures 127-127 therein. A plurality of rectangular bars 1311-1311, 131-131, 132-132 and 133-133 are fixed end-to-end to one another and to the rearward face of the plate 126 in such a manner as to form a. pair of rectangular structures which, among other functions, reinforce the plate 126. Secured fixedly to the rearward face of the plate 126 between and in a spaced relationship to the two rectangular structures and with its web facing rearwardly is a section of channel 135 having fixed thereto a pair of rectangular mounting spacers 135.

A pair of studs 1 -149, spaced apart a distance equal to twice the spacing of the studs 1132, are fixed to the channel 135 and spacers 136 so as to project rearwardly therefrom. The studs 14%) have enlarged heads 141-141 and shanks 142-142 which are proportioned identically to the enlarged heads and shanks of the studs 1112. Thus it can be seen that the mount device 125 can be received upon any of the vertical channels 35, 36 or 37 in a manner similar to the mounting of the plate 27 by inserting the studs 140 in the larger ends of any alternate two of the apertures 61, any alternate two of the apertures 62, or any alternate two of the apertures 63 and by allowing the studs to move downwardly within the apertures. By spacing the studs 140-141) further apart than the studs 102-162 a somewhat firmer mounting for the fingers 30 is provided in comparison to the mounting of the plates 27. A belt 145 is reciprocably mounted within a collar 146 fixedly secured to the upper end of the channel 135 and plate 126. The bolt 145 is located adjacent the upper one of the studs 140 and is movable to a position in which, when the enlarged heads of the studs are received in the smaller ends of a pair of apertures, the bolt projects into the larger end of the upper one of the apertures. A spring 147 is received within the collar 146 and acts between the collar and bolt 145 to urge the bolt into said position. A small handle 151') is fixed to the bolt 145 and may be used to retract the bolt from the above-mentioned position.

Thus the mount device 125 may be mounted upon any of the channels 35, 36 or 37 in a similar manner to that described with relation to the plate 27 by moving the t5 studs 14%) into the desired apertures and moving the studs downwardly therein but, at the same time, either holding the bolt in a retracted position or forcing it into a retracted position by means of the portion of the frame adjacent to the upper aperture of the two apertures within which the studs are being received.

The channel 135 is arranged parallel to and spaced from the bars 133 a sufficient distance that the forwardly projecting legs of the channels 35, 36 or 37 upon which the mounting device 125 is received will be received in the thus provided spaces, as illustrated in FIG. 9.

The fingers 30 are formed in generally an L'shape but have plates 155-155 provided with toothed upper surfaces 157-157 secured to the opposite sides of the distal portion 156 thereof whereby a box or other object engaged by the fingers will be held securely by the toothed upper surfaces of the plates 155. The fingers are independently pivotally mounted, by means of tubular spacer members 160-166, upon a pair of rods 158-158 which are fixed within suitable apertures in the upper portions of the plate 132 and 133. A plurality of springs 161-161 are wound around the tubular spacer members upon which the fingers are mounted and act between the plate 126 and the fingers to urge the fingers into the rejecting position shown in solid lines in FIG. 7. Each of the fingers is pivotal between the above mentioned projecting position, in which the fingers project forwardly beyond the plane of the forward portions of the abutment element 25, and a position (shown in dotted lines in FIG. 7) in which they are retracted rearwardly of said plane.

A pair of plates 162-162 are pivotally mounted upon a pair of rods 165-165 fixed at one end to the bars 132 and at the other to the bars 133. The plates 162 are movable upwardly into a position, shown in dotted lines in FIG. 7, wherein they may engage a downwardly extending projection 166 from each of the fingers so as to block the fingers in their retracted positions. The f0rwardly facing surface of the plate 126 is parallel to and is spaced in front of the forwardly facing portions of the frame 24 by an amount equal to only the thickness of the plate 126 and therefore the forward face of the mounting device is approximately aligned with the forwardly facing portions of the frame 24. When the fingers 30 are in their projecting position they extend forwardly beyond the plane within which the forwardly facing portions of the abutment element 25 are arranged and beyond the plane Within which the forwardly facing portions of the frame are arranged; and therefore, when the lift truck is moved toward a box or crate to be lifted, the fingers can engage components of the load without the abutment element 25 or the frame 24 first engaging the load and preventing engagement by the fingers. It should be noted that forces acting upon the mounting device 125 during operation of the apparatus will not misali'gn the device 125 because the forwardly projecting legs of the channel upon which the device is mounted will engage the plate 126 to prevent such misalignment.

Referring now to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, the forks 26 are pivotally mounted upon the frame 24 at the lower end thereof upon a pair of rods -175 removably received within suitable apertures 176-176 in the connecting members 45 and the forwardly projecting members 80. The forks 26 are manually swingable between the forwardly projecting position of the rightward fork of FIG. 2 and the upwardly extending position of the leftward fork of FIG. 2. When the forks are in the upwardly extending positions, the most forward portions of the forks are approximately aligned with the most forward portions of the abutment element 25.

The forks may be retained in their upwardly extending positions by locking devices indicated generally by the numerals 177-177 and which comprise bolts 180-180 reciprocably mounted in collars 181-181 and urged to extending positions by springs 182-182 received about reduced diameter portions of the bolts and acting between the bolts and projecting members 184 which have suitable apertures for reciprocable reception of the bolts. Both the collars 181 and the projecting members 184- are fixedly mounted on the horizontal channel 41. The bolts retain the forks 26 in upwardly projecting position by engaging suitable cavities 185-185 in the forks 26 and may be retracted to disengage the forks by means of handles 186-136 fixed to the bolts. When the bolts are in projecting position the handles 186 are received in open ended slots in the collars 181 and thus the bolts may be retained in retracted position by retracting the bolts and rotating them until the handles abut the ends of the collars adjacent the spring 182.

Each fork is mounted in front of a respective one of the vertical bars 50, each of which is provided with a downwardly facing abutment surface 187 (FIG. 4). Each fork 26 has a surface 190 which faces upwardly toward a respective one of the abutment surfaces 187 when the fork is in its forwardly projecting position. Each of a pair of rectangular abutment members 191-191 is removably fixed to a respective one of the surfaces 190 by a plurality of screws 192-192 (only one of which is shown). When a fork is in its forwardly projecting position the respective abutment surface 187 associated with the fork engages the respective abutment member 191 to prevent the fork from pivoting past its forwardly projecting position. The forwardly projecting position of each respective fork can be adjusted upwardly, to provide for the fork having been sprung, by removing or loosening the respective abutment member 191 and by placing a shim or shims between the respective abutment member 191 and surface 190 and then refixing of the abutment member to the fork by the screws 192.

The abutment element 25, being slidably mounted upon the frame 24, makes possible, when using the herein described apparatus to lift a first object and to stack the first object upon a second object, the alignment of the first and second objects. Assume that the attachment has been secured to the elevator mechanism 21 of the lift truck 20 by the blocks 60 and screws 57, that the plates 27 and fingers 30 are not mounted on the apparatus and that the lift forks 26 are located in their forwardly projecting position as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 and as illustrated for the rightward fork of FIG. 2. The lift truck is operated to move the forks into the pallet upon which the first object is resting until the forward portions of the abutment element and/ or the frame engage the pallet and/or first object. The elevator mechansim is operated to lift the pallet and first object, causing the frame 24 to move upwardly but allowing the abutment element 25 to remain in a downward position resting upon the stop member 22.

If the. frame and lift forks are raised to a sufiicient height, the connecting members 45 and forwardly projecting members 80 of the frame 24 will engage the horizontal bar 72 of the abutment element. Further upward movement of the frame after such engagement causes the abutment element 25 to move upwardly with the frame. Whether or not the frame moves upwardly a sufficient distance to lift the abutment element, the frame and lift forks are moved upwardly a sufficient distance so that the .abutment element extends below the lower surface of the lift forks, pallet and first object carried by the lift forks. Thus, when the lift truck and elevator mechanism are operated to stack the pallet and first object upon a second such object, the forward face of the abutment element will engage the sideward surface of the second object aligning the pallet and first object thereon with the second object. The lift truck and elevator mechanism are then, of course, operated to remove the lift forks from the pallet.

Assuming now that one of the plates 27 is mounted on the frame 24 as above described with regard to the studs 102 and, as illustrated in FIG. 2, on the most central vertical channel 36,. T e height of mounting of the plate will be determined by the vertical dimension of the particular boxes to be handled. Assume further that the lift forks 26 are retained in their upward positions (as is the left lift fork of FIG. 2) by the locking devices 177. Referring to FIG. 13, the structure of a box 194 for which the plates 27 are particularly adapted is illustrated as comprising a main body 195 to which an upper cap 196 and a lower cap 197 are secured by a fold arrangement 2% and by metal bands 201-201 surroundings the caps. Such boxes are strongest at their caps and are relatively weak and easy to rupture at their main bodies.

The lift truck 20 and elevator mechanism are operated to move the plate 27 against one surface of the main body 195 of the box 194. The limited pivotal mounting of the plate 27 (of the box-like device upon U-shaped element 97) allows the plate to align itself in contact with the surface of the main body 195. The elevator mechanism 21 is then operated to raise the plate to a position as shown in FIG. 13 extending into the joint 200 of the upper cap 196. It will not always be necessary that the plate be as fully inserted in the cap 196 as is shown in FIG. 13 but the upper edge of the plate should be positioned above the lower edge of the cap 196. The box is then lifted by operation of the elevator mechanism 21.

The abutment element 25 will remain in its downward position during initial lifting of the frame 24 and plate 27 so as to support the box 194 at the lower cap 197 where the box is strongest. it can be seen that the supporting of the box at its upper sideward portion by the plate 27 will cause the weight of the box and its contents to pivot the box against the abutment element 25 whereby the box is supported at its lower cap 197. If desired, the box 194 may be stacked upon another such box 262. As described above with regard to the operation of the lift forks, the abutment element 25 may be used to align the box 194 upon the box 202 during the stacking operation. The location of mounting of the plate 27 upon the frame is so chosen that, when the frame and plate are moved upwardly by the elevator mechanism, the abutment element 25 is carried by the frame so as to extend below the lower surface of the box 194 as illustrated in FIG. 13. Thus, during stacking, the abutment element will engage the lower box 202 to align the box 194 therewith. The lift truck and elevator mechanism are then operated to disengage the plate 27 from the cap 196 of the box 194.

In the case of very small boxes the apertures 85 in channels 81 may be used to mount the plates 27. In such a case the abutment element is not used for alignment during stacking.

The fingers 30 are used as above described with regard to the plate 27 with the exception that the mounting devices for the fingers cannot be mounted upon the vertical channels 81. The fingers 30 are best adapted for use with crates or where the box to be lifted is provided with a rail for engagement by the fingers or with suitable apertures for reception of the fingers. When using the fingers 30 the base of the box is supported by the abutment element 25 and alignment of boxes during stacking is facilitated by the abutment element in the same manner as described with regard to the plate.

Extension plates or wings 31 may be attached to the lateral edges 32 of the abutment element 25 so as to make possible handling of two side-by-side boxes or two side-byside boxes with two more such boxes stacked thereon. The most outward channels of the two pairs of channels 70 and 71 are each provided with three keyhole shaped apertures 205-295 (FIG. 3) which are used to mount the extension plates by means of studs 206-2116 (FIG. 12) fixed to and projecting from rectangular, extension plate frames 207-207 which are fixed to and support the extension plates 31. Each of the apertures 295 has its larger end located upwardly and its smaller end located downwardly. Each of the studs 206 has an enlarged head 218 and a reduced di- 9 ameter shank 211 similar to the heads and shanks of the studs 132 and 140. The mounting of the extension plates 31 at the apertures 205 is efiected in the same manner as the mounting of the plates 27 and the fingers 30 with the exception that no reciprocable bolt such as the bolts 196 and 145 is provided to retain the studs in the apertures. Instead, a thumbscrew 212 is threadedly mounted in the extension plate frame 267 and may be rotated into engagement with a dimple 213 in each lateral edge 32 of the abutment element 25 so as to fix the extension plates in place on the abutment element and so as to retain the studs 206 in apertures 205.

Each extension plate 31 has a forward surface 215 which, when the extension plate is so fixedly mounted, is in the plane within which the forward portions of the abutment element 25 are arranged. Thus by so attaching the extension plates 31 to the abutment element, the effective forwardly facing surfaces of the abutment element may be laterally extended. Attached to each extension plate frame 207 is a triangular member 216 arranged to maintain the extension plates 31 in alignment with the forward face of the abutment element by engaging the connecting plates 76 when a force is applied to the plates 31 tending to misalign them and the abutment element. When the extension plates are used, either the fingers 30 or the plates 27 may be mounted upon the outward vertical channels 35 and 37 for lifting side-by-side boxes in the same manner as described above with regard' to a single box. The fixedin-place extension plates 31 prevent the two side-by-side boxes from pivoting apart and maintain them aligned and close together. 1

Various other accessories are capable of use with the attachment for lift trucks herein described, for example, a personnel platform, a boom for reaching over obstructions and a ram for handling coils to be used in place of the lift forks.

I claim as my invention:

1. A lift truck attachment for handling objects comprising a frame attachable to the elevator mechanism of a lift truck, an abutment element mounted upon said frame in such a manner that said frame and ele ment are vertically movable with respect to one another, and means securable to said frame so as to project from said frame for engaging an object to be lifted, whereby, when the lift truck and elevator mechanism are operated to lift a first object and to stack the first object upon a second object, said abutment element remains in a downward position, depending significantly below the bottoms of said frame and said first object, to provide means for aligning the first and second objects.

2. For use with handling apparatus including a lift truck, an elevator mechanism mounted upon said truck, and a stop member carried by said truck generally below the elevator mechanism for preventing an object carried by said elevator mechanism from dropping to a surface upon which the truck operates; an attachment for handling boxes which comprises a frame attachable to the elevator mechanism, an abutment element mounted upon said frame in such a manner that said frame may move vertically upwardly to a limited extent relative to said element before said element is entrained with said frame, said element being so proportioned that it is prevented by the stop member from dropping to the surface, and means securable to said frame so as to project from said frame for engaging an upper portion of a box to be lifted, whereby, when said lift truck is operated to raise said means into engagement with the upper portion of a box, said abutment element will remain in a downward position, depending significantly below the bottoms of said frame and said box, to support the bottom of the box and to provide a depending abutment surface substantially coplanar with the adjacent side of the box.

3. An attachment adapted to be employed with a lift truck having an elevator mechanism mounted on the lift truck and a stop member carried by the lift truck generally below and forwardly of the elevator mechanism for preventing an object carried by the elevator mechanism from dropping to a surface upon which the truck operates, which comprises a frame, means for attaching said frame to Said elevator mechanism forwardly thereof, an abutment element mounted upon the lower portion of said frame in such a manner that said frame and element are vertically movable with respect to one another, said element being so proportioned that it is prevented by the stop member from dropping to the surface, said element having forward portions which are arranged in a vertical plane spaced forwardly of the lower portion of said frame, means securable to said frame so as to extend forwardly beyond said plane for engaging an upper sideward portion of a box to be lifted, whereby, when said lift truck is operated to raise said means into engagement with the upper sideward portion of a box, said abutment element will remain in a downward position to support the bottom of the box to provide a depending abutment surface substantially in said plane.

4. The attachment of claim 3 in which said means comprises a plate, said plate being securable to said frame so as to project upwardly in a plane generally parallel to the first-mentioned plane but slightly forwardly thereof, said plate having a straight edge facing upwardly whereby the blade can securely engage within the cap joint of a box.

5. The attachment of claim 3 in which said means comprises a mounting member securable to said frame, a plurality of fingers pivotally mounted on said member, each of said fingers being independently pivotal between a position retracted rearwardly of said plane and a position projecting forwardly beyond said plane, spring means acting between said member and each of said fingers and urging said fingers into their projecting position, each of said fingers having a toothed lifting surface which faces upwardly when said fingers are in their projecting position.

6. In handling apparatus including a lift truck having an elevator mechanism mounted upon the lift truck at the forward end thereof and a stop member carried by said lift truck generally below and forwardly of said elevator mechanism for preventing an object carried by said elevator mechanism from dropping to a surface upon which the truck operates; an attachment for the lift truck which comprises a frame, means for attaching said frame to said elevator mechanism forwardly thereof, an abutment element mounted upon said frame in such a manner that said frame and said element are vertically mov able with respect to one another, said element being so proportioned that it is prevented by the stop member from dropping to the surface, said element having forwardly facing portions which are arranged in a vertical plane spaced forwardly of the lower portion of said frame, said element and frame being so constructed that, after said frame has been raised upwardly a certain distance, said frame engages said element in such a manner that further raising of said frame also raises said element, a plate, and means for attaching said plate to said frame above said element with said plate projecting upwardly in a plane generally parallel to the above-mentioned plane but slightly forwardly thereof.

7. The attachment of claim 6 in which said plate is selectively mountable upon said frame at any of a plurality of vertically spaced positions whereby said plate may be located in a position such that, when a box is being carried by said plate and said element is in a lowermost position relative to said frame, said element extends downwardly beyond the box with the forward portions of said element aligned with a surface of the box for facilitating stacking of the box upon and in alignment with another such box.

8. The attachment of claim 6 additionally comprising a second plate, means for attaching said second plate to said frame with said second plate projecting upwardly in a plane generally parallel to the above-mentioned plane but slightly forwardly thereof, said plates being spaced transversely of said frame whereby a pair of boxes may be lifted, and a pair of extension plates, means for fixing said extension plates to the lateral edges of said element, said extension plates having forwardly facing surfaces which, when said extension plates are so fixed, are aligned with the forwardly facing portions of said element whereby the effective forwardly facing portions of said element are extended laterally of said element to support the pair of boxes.

9. The attachment of claim 8 in which said means for attaching each of said plates to said frame comprises a base upon which said plate is mounted, a pair of studs having enlarged heads and projecting from said base, said frame being provided with at least a pair of keyhole shaped apertures having larger ends sufiiciently large to admit said enlarged heads and smaller ends sufficiently small to retain said enlarged heads, said apertures being spaced and oriented in such a manner that,

' when one of said studs is received in one of said larger ends, the other of said studs can be received in the other of said larger ends and, when one of said studs is received in one of said smaller ends, the other of said studs can be received in the other of said smaller ends, a bolt reciprocably mounted upon said base, said bolt being movable to a position in which, when said studs are received in the smaller ends of said apertures, said bolt projects into the larger end of one of said apertures, and spring means acting between said base and said bolt and urging said bolt into its above-mentioned position.

10. The attachment of claim 8 in which said means for fixing said extension plates to said frame comprises a plurality of studs having enlarged heads and projecting from each respective extension plate, said frame being provided with an equal plurality of keyhole shaped apertures equally spaced one above the other on each side of said frame, the smaller ends of the apertures being downward and the larger ends being upward, the larger ends of said apertures being sufliciently large to admit said enlarged heads and the smaller ends sufficiently small to retain said enlarged heads, the spacing of said studs and said apertures being such that, when one of said studs is received in one of said larger ends, the others of said studs can be received in the others of said larger ends whereby the studs can be moved downwardly in said apertures to mount the extension plates, a thumb screw threadedly mouthed in each respective extension plate, and a dimple on each side of said frame arranged for engagement by a respective thumb screw, whereby each respective extension plate can be fixed with relation to said frame by screwing said thumb screw tightly into said dimple.

11. In combination, a lift truck, an elevator mechanism mounted upon the lift truck at the forward end thereof, a stop member carried by said lift truck generally below and forwardly of said elevator mechanism for preventing an object carried by said elevator mechanism from dropping to a surface upon which the truck operates, a frame secured to the elevator mechanism forwardly thereof, said frame having forwardly facing portions arranged in a vertical plane, an abutment element mounted upon the lower portion of said frame in such a manner that said frame and element are vertically movable with respect to one another, said element being so proportioned that it is prevented by the stop member from dropping to the surface, said element having forward portions which are arranged in a second vertical plane spaced forwardly of the lower portion of said frame, a plate, said plate being attachable to said frame with said plate projecting upwardly in a plane generally parallel to the above-mentioned planes but forwardly thereof, a pair of lift forks mounted upon the lower portion of said frame, said forks being pivotal between a position in which said forks project forwardly for lifting engagement with a pallet and a position in which said forks project upwardly and are aligned with the forwardly facing portion of said abutment element to prevent interference with the operation of said plate, and means for retaining said forks in the upwardly projecting position.

12. A fork attachment for a lift truck having an elevator mechanism mounted thereon which comprises a frame, means for attaching said frame to said elevator mechanism forwardly thereof, said frame having a forwardly facing portion which is arranged in a vertical plane and a pair of downwardly facing abutment surfaces at the lower end of said frame, a pair of forks each pivotally mounted forwardly of a respective one of said abutment surfaces and each pivotal upwardly to a position received within said frame and downwardly to a forwardly projecting, load carrying position, each of said forks having a surface which projects rearwardly and faces upwardly toward a respective one of said abutment surfaces when the respective fork is in its forwardly projecting position, a pair of abutment members, a plurality of screws removably fixing each of said abutment members to a respective one of said surfaces of said forks, whereby the forwardly projecting position of each of said forks may be adjusted upwardly by the insertion of shims between said surfaces of said forks and said abutment members.

13. Apparatus for mounting a device at selective heights on a lift truck comprising an attachment securabie to the elevator mechanism of the lift truck, said attachment being provided with a plurality of keyhole shaped apertures equally spaced one above the other, the smaller ends of the apertures being downward and the larger ends being upward, a plurality of studs having enlarged heads and projecting from the device, the larger ends of said apertures being sufliciently large to admit said enlarged heads and the smaller ends suificiently small to retain said enlarged heads, the spacing of said studs and said apertures being such that, when one of said studs is received in one of said larger ends, the others of said studs can be received in others of said larger ends, whereby the studs can be moved downwardly in said apertures to mount the attachment, and means for retaining said studs downwardly in said apertures.

14. The apparatus of claim 13 in which said means is a thumb screw threadedly mounted in the device, said attachment having a dimple located for engagement by said thumb screw, whereby said device can be fixed with relation to said frame.

15. The apparatus of claim 13 in which said means is a bolt reciprocably mounted upon the device, said bolt being movable to a position in which, when said enlarged eads are received in the smaller ends of said apertures, said bolt projects into the larger end of one of the apertures within which one of said studs is received, and spring means acting between said device and said bolt and urging said bolt into its above-mentioned position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,682,347 Jackson June 29, 1954 2,744.645 Cirillo May 8, 1956 2,893,582 Parcell July 7, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 575,111 Canada May 5, 1959 Disclaimer 3,023,919.LZ03 d L. Hobson, Elnora, Ind. LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT. Patent dated Mar. 6, 1962. Disclaimer filed Mar. 28, 1963, by the inventor.

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 11 of said patent.

[Ofiicial Gazette May 21, 1963.]

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification414/607, 414/785, 414/619
International ClassificationB66F9/12, B66F9/16
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/16
European ClassificationB66F9/16