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Publication numberUS3024664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1962
Filing dateDec 30, 1957
Priority dateDec 30, 1957
Publication numberUS 3024664 A, US 3024664A, US-A-3024664, US3024664 A, US3024664A
InventorsElwood T Platz
Original AssigneeIte Circuit Breaker Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary handle mechanism
US 3024664 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 13, 1962 E. T. PLATZ ROTARY HANDLE MECHANISM 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec.

IN ENTOR. .'zh dap z' A44 72 Arraf/ym March 13, 1962 E. T. PLATZ ROTARY HANDLE MECHANISM 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 30, 1957 INVENTOR. 1 W000 7. #1475 A Twin/7 E. T. PLATZ ROTARY HANDLE MECHANISM March 13, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 30, 1957 March 13, 1962 E. T. PLATZ ROTARY HANDLE MECHANISM 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Dec. 30, 1957 INVENTOR. 1m; r rzirz ,4 7/ new United States Patent Q 3,024,664 ROTARY HANDLE MECHANKSM Elwood T. Platz, Detroit, Mich, assignor to I-T-E Cir= cuit Breaker Company, Philadelphia, Pa, a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Dec. 30, 1957, Ser. No. 706,186 6 Claims. (Cl. 7489) My invention relates to a rotary handle mechanism and more specifically relates to a rotary handle mechanism for circuit breakers which converts a rotary operating motion into lateral output motion or side to side motion within a plane.

Mechanical and electromechanical systems such as circuit breakers in many cases, require a lateral motion applied to an operating mechanism to operate the circuit breaker contacts. In many conditions, it is desirable to derive this lateral motion from an input rotary motion.

In the case of circuit breaker 2, the mechanism for converting the rotary input motion to a lateral output motion must meet several other conditions. For example, it may be required that after the rotary handle is moved, that it be brought back to some initial position.

In many cases, it may be necessary that the rotary handle be movable over a distance of ninety degrees or more so as to achieve a large mechanical advantage over the laterally movable operating yoke which is to be moved. Furthermore, the mechanism should be such that the rotary motion in one plane can give rise to a lateral motion in either the same plane or a plane at right angles thereto.

A further requirement which is met by my novel mech anism is that the trip latch of the circuit breaker can be operated responsive to the manual operation of the breaker to the off position, thus following the precedent of many large power circuit breakers.

The primary object of my invention is to provide a novel mechanism for converting a rotary input motion into an output lateral motion.

A further object of my invention is to provide a novel rotary operating mechanism for operating a laterally movable mechanism which is simple, reliable and relatively inexpensive.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel rotary handle operating mechanism which can be adapted to replace the laterally movable handle operating mechanism.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a novel rotary operating mechanism which trips a circuit breaker trip latch when manually moved to an ofi position.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel rotary operating mechanism for circuit breakers in which the handle is automatically returned to a predetermined position after its operation.

These and other objects of my invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 shows a top view of a multiphase circuit breaker equipped with my novel rotary operating mechanism.

FIGURE 2 shows a side view of the laterally movable operating toggle mechanism of FIGURE 1 where the breaker is in the off position.

FIGURE 3 shows a side cross-sectional view of one phase of the breaker of FIGURE 1 when in the on operation.

FIGURE 4 shows a top view of the assembled handle mechanism of FIGURES 5 and 6.

FIGURE 5 shows an exploded perspective view of my novel rotary operating mechanism.

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FIGURE 6 shows an assembled side view of the mechanism of FIGURE 5.

Referring now to the figures, FIGURES 1, 2, and 3 set forth one type of circuit breaker to which my novel invention could be applied. It is to be noted that while the following description of my novel invention is made in conjunction with the specific circuit breaker of FIG- URES 1 through 3, that any type circuit breaker which could be of either the single pole, or multi pole type, such as that illustrated in Patent No. 2,905,795 could be modified in accordance with the invention.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the circuit breaker is of the three pole type having input line conductors 10, 12 and 14 for each respective pole and output load conductors 16, 18 and 20 respectively for the same respective poles. Each of line conductors 10, 12 and 14 are taken through arc chute means 26 and are terminated by a respective stationary contact such as contact 23 for the phase including line member 14 as seen in FIGURE 3. Each of the stationary contacts then cooperate with a respective movable contact 34.

The movable contacts in all three phases are connected to a common operating bar 36 and are pivotally movable on bar 36 to be movable into and out of engagement with their cooperating stationary contact. The operating mechanism for operating the movable contacts will be set forth hereinafter in conjunction with FIGURE 2.

The current path for each pole is completed, and as best seen in FIGURE 4 for the case of the highest pole in FIGURE 1, is comprised of line conductor member 14, stationary contact 28, movable contact 34, pigtail 38, conductor 40 and line conductor member 20.

The circuit breaker of FIGURES 1-3 is manually operated from a rotary operating handle seen in FIGURE 1 where, as shown by plaque 52, the operating handle is rotated counterclockwise to open the contacts, and clockwise to close the contacts.

As will be more fully described hereinafter, the operating handle 50 (FIGURE 1), is rotatably mounted on the operating shaft 54, FIGURE 2 which is seated in any desired manner in the casing of the circuit breaker. Shaft 54, as best seen in FIGURE 2 has an extending crank arm 56 rigidly secured thereto which has its outer end secured in a ball and socket connection to one end of member 58. The other end of member 58 is secured in a second ball and socket connection to a member (not shown) which is fastened to an operating yoke 60 as best seen in FIGURE 2.

Yoke 60 is pivotally supported about pivot point 62, and forms an operating toggle linkage with link 64 (FIG- URE 2) and springs 66 where one end of toggle link 64 is positioned in a shoulder of latching cradle 68. The toggle linkage is then connected to contact arm 33 through an intermediate link 70 which is pivotally connected at the junction between spring 66 and toggle link 64.

Since the construction of the above noted toggle mechanism are the subject of my copending application Serial No. 728,973 filed April 16, 1958 entitled, Automatic Resetting Mechanism and assigned to the assignee of the instant invention, reference is made thereto for details of its construction and operation. It is only necessary for purposes of the instant invention to understand that as the yoke 60 is laterally rotated counterclockwise from the position of FIGURE 2 responsive to rotation of operating handle 5t) whereby the movable contacts will snap to the engaged position. The contacts may then be disengaged either by opposite rotation of yoke 60, or by defeat or unlatching of latch member 72 which normally latches cradle 68 in the position shown. Automatic tripping of the circuit breaker can be achieved by operation of a common tripper bar of FIGURE 4a to unlatch aoegeea 3 trip member 87 and thus the main trip latch 89 which latches cradle 68.

As best seen in FIGURE 2 each of the phases has an indicating cylinder 76 associated therewith which cooperate with windows 86, 82 and 84 respectively (FIG- URE l) in cover 85a (FIGURE 3) to present the ap propriate contact indication to an observer. More specifically, each of the phase indicators can present either an off, on, overload, or shortcircuit indication through their respective window. Furthermore, they can present conditions particular to their own respective phase. By way of example, in FIGURE 3, the circuit breaker has been tripped, and a visual inspection clearly shows that the breaker operated automatically because of an overload on the lower phase.

Further details to the operation of this structure are set forth in copending application Ser. No. 706,169 filed December 30, 1957 now Patent No. 2,905,795.

FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 are detailed views of my novel rotary handle mechanism and specifically show it in conjunction with the circuit breaker of FIGURES 1 through 4, where the side view of FIGURE 6 shows the mechanism with the breaker in the off or rest position.

As has been previously described, a ball and socket member 58 is employed to attach rotatable crank 56 to laterally movable yoke 60. The ball and socket member 58 is best shown in FIGURE as comprising an elongated tubular member having windows 86 and 88 on either end. Window 86 receives a ball member 96 secured to crank 56 the ball member 90 being retained in window 86 by threaded plug 92 which may be secured in turn by pin 94 which is passed through the operature 96 in alignment with the slot in the end of plug 92.

Since yoke 60 moves in a plane which is at right angles to the plane of motion of crank 56, window 88 is at right angles to window 86. Clearly, the angular relation between the windows 86 and 88 will be given by the angular displacement between the planes of motion of crank 56 and yoke 60.

As best seen in FIGURE 5, yoke 60 has a ball member 96 attached thereto by member 98 which is fastened to yoke 60 at point 98 on the yoke. Ball member 96 is then secured in window 88 by means of the plug 100 and pin 102 in the same manner as that described for ball 90.

The lower end of the actuator shaft 54 which rigidly supports crank arm 56 is journaled into the mechanism frame 104 by means of the actuator shaft stud 106 (FIG- URES 5 and 6) which is secured to frame 104 in any desired manner. The mid portion of the actuator shaft is journaled to the cover plate 108 (FIGURE 6) by means of the plate 110. Therefore, the shaft 54 is supported between the frame member 104 and the cover plate 108. Rotation of shaft 54 will clearly cause movement of yoke 60 from the toggle position shown in FIGURE 6 to a second otf-center toggle position which is counterclockwise with respect to FIGURE 6 as shown in FIGURE 3.

The operating handle 50 of FIGURES 1 and 3 is, as best seen in FIGURE 3 rotatably mounted with respect to the shaft 54, but is fastened to the operator disk 112 of FIGURE 5 by having a square opening in the bottom of handle 50 which cooperates with square protrusion 114 of disk 112. Accordingly, disk 112 and handle 56 move as a unitary member.

As best seen in FIGURE 6, a cup shaped operator disk cover 116 of insulating material is interposed between handle 50 and operator disk 112. Operator disk 112 further carries a stud 118 thereon which is rotatably movable into engagement with shoulders 120 and 122 of a notch in an actuator member 124 (FIGURES 5 and 4) which is keyed to shaft 54 through the engagement of square member 126 fastened to shaft 54, and the coopcrating square opening 128 in actuator member 124.

The complete mechanism described above is positioned within a retainer ring 130 which is secured to the cover of FIGURE 3, the retainer ring 1363 serving to house conventional compression spring 132 within its inner periphery. A stop plate 134 is positioned within ring 13% (FIGURES 5 and 4) and has a groove 136 (FIG- URE 5 therein). Both of the ends of spring 132 abut either end of stop plate 136 as shown in FIGURE 4.

A curved lug 138 which protrudes downwardly from member 112 engages the groove 136 and is positioned between either end of springs 132.

The above described moved structure operates first to translate rotary motion applied to operating handle 50 into lateral motion at yoke 60, but further operates to always position the operating handle in a predetermined position.

This is seen from FIGURES 1, 5 and 4, where FIG- URE 4 shows the handle mechanism with the breaker on. In order to turn the breaker off the handle is rotated counterclockwise as indicated in FIGURE 1. This rotation will cause member 112 (FIGURE 5) and its stud 113 to move counterclockwise in FIGURE 4 whereby stud 118 engaging shoulder 122 of disk member 124 witl rotate disk 124 and thus shaft 54 and crank 56 from the on position of FIGURE 3 to the off position of FIGURE 6.

During this rotation, projection 138 of member 112 will rotate counterclockwise to compress spring 132. Accordingly, when the operating handle 56 is released, spring 132 will carry the operating handle back to its neutral position of FIGURE 3, stud 118 moving througi the notch forming shoulders 12% and 122 in member 124, at which point the left hand end of spring once again hits the left hand side of member 134 and projection 138 rests within groove 136 (FIGURE 5).

Clearly the same type of operation will proceed if the operating handle is now rotated clockwise to put the breaker in the on position whereby the operating handle will be returned to its neutral position.

If it is desired to trip latch 39 of FIGURE 3 responsive to manual operation to the off position, a bent rod 150 may be pivotally supported from yoke 66 at point 152 (FIGURES 5 and 6) and passing through an opening in the trip housing (schematically shown in FIGURE 6 as housing portion 154) so that its opposite end is in registry with an extension 156 of tripper bar 85. A light biasing spring 153 (FIGURES 5 and 6) is then provided for rod 150 to lightly bias it upwardly.

In operation, when the yoke 63 is manually operated to the off position, the end of rod 150 will move to strike the extension 156 of tripper bar to thereby automatically trip the contacts before the manual operation is complete.

This is shown in FIGURE 1, Where the line labeled off unlatch is reached prior to the off toggle position where the overcenter toggle position is reached.

In the foregoing, I have described my invention only in connection with preferred embodiments thereof. Many variations and modifications of the principles of my invention within the scope of the description herein are obvious. Accordingly, I prefer to be bound not by the specific disclosure herein but only by the appending claims.

I claim:

1. A rotary handle mechanism for driving a pivotally movable member movable in a first plane; said rotary handle mechanism including a rotatably movable shaft having an extending crank arm; the outer end of said extending crank arm being connected to one end of a connecting member in a first ball socket connection, the other end of said connecting member engaging said pivotally movable member in a second ball socket connection; a rotary operating handle operatively connectable to said shaft; said rotary operating handle being rotatably movable in a first and second direction in a plane nonparallel to said first plane, and being connected to said shaft only after a predetermined rotation thereof; said shaft, when connected to said handle, being movable thereby to a first and a second position upon rotation of said handle in said first and said second directions, respectfully; biasing means for biasing said rotary operating handle to return to a predetermined position after rotation in said first or second direction; means for retaining said shaft in said first and said second positions after said biasing means returns said handle to said predetermined position.

2. A rotary handle mechanism for driving a pivotally movable member movable in a first plane; said rotary handle mechanism including a rotatably movable shaft having an extending crank arm; the outer end of said extending crank arm being connected to one end of a connecting member in a first ball socket connection, the other end of said connecting member engaging said pivotally movable member in a second ball socket connection; a rotary operating handle operatively connectable to said shaft; said rotary operating handle being rotatably movable in a first and second direction in a plane nonparallel to said first plane, and being connected to said shaft only after a predetermined rotation thereof; said shaft, when connected to said handle, being movable thereby to a firstand a second position upon rotation of said handle in said first and said second directions, respectfully; biasing means for biasing said rotary operating handle to return to a predetermined position after rotation in said first or second direction; means for retaining said shaft in said first and said second positions after said biasing means returns said handle to said predetermined position; said operatively connectable connection between said rotary operating handle and said shaft including a first member rigidly connected to said rotatable member and a second member rigidly connected to said shaft; said second member having an open portion defining a first and second shoulder, said first memher having a projection positioned within and movable within said opening and engaging said first shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said first direction and engaging said second shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said second direction.

3. A rotary handle mechanism for driving a pivotally movable member movable in a first plane; said rotary handle mechanism including a rotatably movable shaft having an extending crank arm; the outer end of said extending crank arm being connected to one end of a connecting member in a first ball socket connection, the other end of said connecting member engaging said pivotally movable member in a second ball socket connection; a rotary operating handle operatively connectable to said shaft; said rotary operating handle being rotatably movable in a first and second direction in a plane nonparallel to said first plane, and being connected to said shaft only after a predetermined rotation thereof; said shaft, when connected to said handle, being movable thereby to a first and a second position upon rotation of said handle in said first and said second directions, respectfully; biasing means for biasing said rotary operating handle to return to a predetermined position after rotation in said first or second direction; means for retaining said shaft in said first and said second positions after said biasing means returns said handle to said predetermined position; said biasing means including a spring member having its axis constrained in a circular shape; the ends of said spring abuting against either side of a relatively fixed member having an open ended groove therein; said rotatable operating handle having a lug protruding therefrom which is positioned in said open ended groove; movement of said rotatable handle in said first direction driving said lug into one end of said spring to load said spring, movement of said rotatable handle in said second direction driving said lug into the other end of said spring to load said spring; said spring biasing said lug into said open ended groove to maintain said rotatable handle in a predetermined position.

4. A rotary handle mechanism for driving a pivotally movable member movable in a first plane; said rotary handle mechanism including a rotatably movable shaft having an extending crank arm; the outer end of said extending crank arm being connected to one end of a connecting member in a first ball socket connection, the other end of said connecting member engaging said pivotally movable member in a second ball socket connection; a rotary operating handle operatively connectable to said shaft; said rotary operating handle being rotatably movable in a first and second direction in a plane nonparallel to said first plane, and being connected to said shaft only after a predetermined rotation thereof; said shaft, when connected to said handle, being movable thereby to a first and a second position upon rotation of said handle in said first and said second directions, respectfully; biasing means for biasing said rotary operating handle to return to a predetermined position after rotation in said first or second direction; means for retaining said shaft in said first and said second positions after said biasing means returns said handle to said predetermined position; said operatively connectable connection between said rotary operating handle and said shaft including a first member rigidly connected to said rotatable member and a second member rigidly connected to said shaft; said second member having an open portion defining a first and second shoulder, said first member having a projection positioned within and movable Within said opening and engaging said first shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said first direction and engaging said second shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said second direction; said biasing means including a spring member having its axis constrained in a circular shape; the ends of said spring abutting against either side of a relatively fixed member having an open ended groove therein; said rotatable operating handle having a lug protruding therefrom which is positioned in said open ended groove; movement of said rotatable handle in said first direction driving said lug into one end of said spring to load said spring, movement of said rotatable handle in said second direction driving said lug into the other end of said spring to load said spring; said spring biasing said lug into said open ended groove to maintain said rotatable handle in a predetermined position.

5. An actuating mechanism for operating a rotatable member between a first and second angular position; said actuating mechanism comprising a rotatable operating handle, a first member, and a second member; said first member being rigidly connected to said rotatable operating handle; said second member being rigidly connected to said rotatable member; said second member having an open portion defining a first and second shoulder, said first member having a projection positioned within and movable within said open portion and engaging said first shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said first direction and engaging said second shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said second direction; and biasing means for returning said rotatable operating handle to a predetermined position after movement of said rotatable member to either of said first or second positions independently of said rotatable member; means for retaining said second member in said first and said second positions after said biasing means has returned said handle to said predetermined position.

6. An actuating mechanism for operating a rotatable member between a first and second angular position; said actuating mechanism comprising a rotatable operating handle, a first member, and a second member; said first member being rigidly connected to said rotatable operating handle; said second member being rigidly connected to said rotatable member; said second member having an open portion defining a first and second shoulder, said first member having a projection positioned within and movable within said open portion and en- "3 gaging said first shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said first direction and engaging said second shoulder when said rotatable handle is moved in said second direction; continued movement of said handle in said first and said second directions, upon engagement of said projection with said first and said second shoulders, being effective to move said second member to a first and a second position, respectively; biasing means for returning said rotatable operating handle to a predetermined position after movement of said rotatable member to either of said first or second positions independently of said rotatable member; means for retaining said second member in said first and said second positions after said biasing means has returned said handle to said predetermined position; said biasing means including a spring member having its axis constrained in a circular shape; the ends of said spring abutting against either side of a relatively fixed member having an open ended groove therein; said rotatable operating handle having a lug protruding therefrom which is positioned in said open ended groove; movement of said rotatable handle in said first direction driving said lug into one end of said spring to load said spring, movement of said rotatable handle in said second direc- 8, tion driving said lug into the other end of said spring to load said spring; said spring biasing said lug into said open ended groove to maintain said rotatable handle in a predetermined position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 634,205 Diehl Oct. 3, 1899 993,570 Webster May 30, 1911 1,814,608 Schuh et a1. July 14, 1931 1,906,294 Weis May 2, 1933 2,222,312 Green Nov. 19, 1940 2,270,867 Cotesworth et al -a Jan. 27, 1942 2,447,137 Runke Aug. 17, 1948 2,493,552 Sacchini Jan. 3, 1950 2,581,115 Levkofi Jan. 1, 1952 2,656,178 Hughes Oct. 20, 1953 2,685,011 Boller et a1. July 27, 1954 2,687,046 Voiech Aug. 24, 1954 2,729,485 Schlage Jan. 3, 1956 2,784,601 Booth Mar. 12, 1957 2,811,618 Cole et a1. Oct. 29, 1957 2,818,751 Jorgensen Jan. 7, 1958 2,829,536 Lynch Apr. 8, 1958

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4238657 *Jul 6, 1978Dec 9, 1980S&C Electric CompanySwitch operator condition and position indicator mechanism
US4273972 *Dec 20, 1979Jun 16, 1981Eaton CorporationJoystick control electric switch
US6080947 *May 7, 1998Jun 27, 2000Eaton CorporationElectrical switching apparatus with operating condition indicators mounted in face plate
EP1401005A2 *Aug 27, 2003Mar 24, 2004ABB PATENT GmbHSwitch device for electrical circuit breaker
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/89, 200/308, 74/42, 74/470, 337/58, 74/97.1, 337/48, 200/401, 200/503
International ClassificationH01H71/56, G05G7/02
Cooperative ClassificationH01H71/56, G05G2700/18, G05G7/02
European ClassificationG05G7/02, H01H71/56