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Publication numberUS3025805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 20, 1962
Filing dateNov 12, 1958
Priority dateNov 12, 1958
Publication numberUS 3025805 A, US 3025805A, US-A-3025805, US3025805 A, US3025805A
InventorsFord Michael J
Original AssigneeInt Paper Co, Stanley Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Car liner
US 3025805 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. J. FORD CAR LINER March 20, 1962 Filed Nov. 12, 1958 l A/ .H BJ, v T f N M7 ,742g @i r y i! a .li ,wm All 7 c We o 1 LA f La/ v m ,mA f 1: w JV (a, JAA 4 Vl f. wf y D B I @y J l|l\ Il \0 1J 2:. w/ L f a n c O o n\ .m Vl n a a l W l ilnited gti-ares @arent @tine 3,925,305 Patented Mar. 20, 1962 3,025,805 CAR LINER Michael l. Ford, Hartsdale, NY., assignor, by mesne assignments, of one-half to International Paper Cornpany, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York, and one-half to The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Filed Nov. 12, 1958, Ser. No. 773,378 3 Claims. (Cl. 10S-423) rIhis invention relates to a car liner, and more particularly to a semi-permanent type of car liner for railway cars and other freight vehicles.

In the use of railway boxcars, the inner liners of the car, formed usually of wooden straps or planks, tend to become damaged and the openings formed in the liners provide avenues for escape and loss of granular and other material which may be carried in the cars, while also providing unsatisfactory vehicles for the shipping of case goods and other commodities. Because of such imperfections in the liners, it is common for the car to be shipped to a repair point, and there the use of the car is lost during a substantial period in which the car is being relined.

There has long been a need for some means for relining a car with a semi-permanent structure which can be applied to the car as it stands on a siding so that the car can be immediately put into use, while at the same time providing such a structure which, when damaged during the shipment of goods, can be readily repaired in situ.

An object of the present invention is to provide a liner of the character described forbringing about the new results above mentioned. A further object is to provide a repairable liner which may be readily secured within a car while at the same time utilizing relatively light and inexpensive materials. A still further object is to provide in such liner structure means whereby damage to the liner is avoided through the use of straps which permit sliding Contact between the liner and cases, etc. being shipped, while at the same time permitting parts of the liner which may be damaged to be readily replaced. Other speciiic objects and advantages will appear as the speciiication proceeds.

The invention is shown, in an illustrative embodiment, by the accompanying drawing, in which- FIGURE l is a broken perspective view of the interior of a railway car equipped with a liner embodying my invention; FIG. 2, a vertical sectional view; FIG. 3, an enlarged detail sectional view, the section being taken as indicated at line '3f-3 of FIG. l; and FIG. 4, a broken vertical sectional view, on an enlarged scale, of the liner structure embodying my invention.

In the illustration given, A designates a railway car having a floor 10, a side liner 11 formed of horizontallyextending liner boards, and an end liner 12 shown in the illustration given formed by vertical liner boards. It will be understood that the liners of cars are formed in a variety of ways and may be of any form of construction.

Assuming that the liners 11 and 12 of the car A have been damaged and have openings therein as illustrated by the numeral 13 in FIG. 2, I find that the car can be effectively lined through use of the liner structure indicated by the letter B.

The liner B preferably comprises a corrugated board having on its inner side a lining sheet 14 and on its outer side a lining sheet 15, the two sheets being adhesively bonded to a corrugated core 16. Against the outer sheet 15 I place metal straps 17 which are preferably provided with spaced nail openings 18 extending continuously therethrough, and the straps 17 are preferably held in position and in spaced-apart relation by an outer web 19 which may be a paper sheet and which is adhesively bonded to the sheet 15 and about said straps 17. By bonding the web 19 about the straps 17, it is found that the straps are held in the spaced-apart position shown, while the board B is being shipped and handled and until the board can be eitectively installed in position upon the liner of the car.

The liner B may be installed upon the car liner 11 or 12 yby placing the same upon the car liner and driving nails through the nail openings 18, the nails extending through the structure B and into the car liner 11 or 12. .lWhere the liner B passes around a corner of the car, the liner B may be readily bent into the desired position by passing a scoring tool (preferably a scoring roller) along the liner portion adjacent the corner so as to crush the inner core 16 at the point of bend. When the core is crushed at this point, the liner B can be bent readily to the position shown in FIG. 3 and the flexible metal strap 17 also permits such bending. Nails may be secured to the liner B about the corner portions, or one corner portion of the member B, to hold the structure tightly within the corner portion of the car.

While I have referred to the straps 17 as formed of flexible metal7 it will be understood that `these may be formed of plastic, iiberglass, or any other suitable material effective for the purposes which will be later described and particularly for the purpose of providing skid tracks along which objects carried within the car may slide under conditions of impact without damaging the structure of the liner B.

While the corrugated board has been shown mounted in a horizontal position within the car and with the straps running also horizontally of the car, it will be understood that the board and straps may be mounted so that the straps run vertically of the car and the strap-equippedboard may extend all the way from the top of one side of the car downwardly over the bottom of the car and upwardly to the top of the other side of the car. I prefer the structure in which the straps run horizontally because of their value in protecting the board structure and also protecting articles slidably engaging the straps.

The board structure may be employed with a car frame or with a car frame having wooden liner boards thereon. For example, in original construction, the wooden liner boards may be omitted, `and the strap-equipped corrugated board may be secured directly to the inner frame of the car consisting of vertical wooden studs or metal studs equipped with nailing strips, etc. Thus, the structure herein may be employed in original construction or for renewing a car having an inner frame lining or such a frame provided with a wooden board lining which has been damaged.

While I have described the liner B as being formed of corrugated board, it will be understood that corrugated pulpboard, laminated or reinforced sheets, or plastic sheets may be employed which will provide the support and strength necessary to protect the commodity loaded in the car, while at the same time supporting the straps in spaced, eective position during the shipping of the goods. Corrugated pulpboard is very useful because it is thicker 'than paper, and even if the outer layer becomes torn, the corrugated medium and inner liner still remain intact to protect the commodity.

In the operation of the liner B, it is found that a case or other lading article designated by the numeral 20 in FIG. 2, upon striking the liner B during a sudden starting or stopping of the car A, tends to engage the straps 17 and to glide or slide along the straps without digging into and injuring the liner B. In this operation, the yielding board structure facilitates the action of the slide members 17 in permitting sliding movement of the case 20 without causing it to dig into and injure the liner B. Such sliding movement is further facilitated by the web or paper sheet 19 on the outside of the liner B. At least until the sheet 19 is torn away or destroyed, the sheet serves a useful function in allowing the case 20 or other article being shipped to slide readily over the straps 17. I have already referred to the function of the outer sheet 19 in confining the straps 17 in spaced-apart position until they are secured upon the car liner 11 or 12 by nails, etc., and it is now noted that such a web or sheet serves the further function of facilitating slippage of a case or other object along the straps 17 in those cases where sudden deceleration or acceleration of the car A occurs.

Should the liner B be damaged at some time through Contact with some article that is being conveyed, and openings, as indicated by the numeral 21, formed in the corrugated board, the area can be readily repaired by placing a corrugated board strip 22 behind the damaged area and secured to the remainder of the corrugated board of the liner B by means of adhesive tape, adhesive, or any other suitable material.

While, in the illustration given, l have set forth a specic structure in considerable detail for the purpose of illustration, the details of structure therein may be varied widely by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. In-combnation with a car having an inner frame, a flat, uncreased liner board adapted to be secured to said frame within said car, and comprising a resilient liner board having a plurality of spaced-apart horizontally extending ilexible, smooth, uncreased support straps adjacent the outer portion of said board away from said car frame, a thin web adhesively secured to the outer portion of said board and enclosing said straps, and means extending through said straps at intermediate spaced-apart points securing said straps and said boardV to said frame, whereby, said straps are outstanding from said board to be exposed as slide rails for engagement with merchandise in the car.

2. In combination With a car having an inner frame, a flat, uncreased liner board adapted to be secured to said frame within said car, and comprising a resilient liner board having a plurality of spaced-apart horizontally extending exible, smooth, uncreased support straps adjacent the outer portion of said board away from said car frame, a thin web adhesively secured to the outer portion of said board and enclosing said straps, and means extending through said straps at intermediate spaced-apart points securing said straps and said board to said frame, whereby said straps are outstanding from said board to be exposed as slide rails for engagement with merchandise in the car, said liner board being provided with a corrugated core and said thin web anchoring said straps to the side of said core opposite said car frame.

3. In combination with a car having an inner frame, a liner board adapted to be secured to said frame in the interior of said car, said board comprising a tinte-equipped corrugated core having a plurality of spaced-apart horizontally extending exible, smooth, uncreased steel straps secured to said board along the side thereof away from said car frame and outstanding therefrom, the flutes of said core extending vertically, a thin web adhesively secured to the said board side and enclosing said straps, said web conforming to said straps to provide slide rail portions, and nails extending through said straps into said frame at horizontally spaced-apart points and intermediate the length of. said straps for securing said board to said frame.

References Cited in the ile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS i' t l, s

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1419085 *Jun 8, 1921Jun 6, 1922Clement Unser EdwardLining for traction vehicles
US1527080 *Apr 5, 1923Feb 17, 1925Herman RingelCar liner
US1803617 *Jun 19, 1930May 5, 1931Hummel Frederick ECar liner
US2532743 *Dec 22, 1945Dec 5, 1950Evans Prod CoWear strip and floor ring
US2738006 *Nov 8, 1952Mar 13, 1956Suess Edwin HFlexible closure for cars and the like
US2794761 *Oct 18, 1955Jun 4, 1957Int Paper CoComposite structural panel and method of making same
US2797178 *Sep 12, 1952Jun 25, 1957Dayton Rubber CompanyContainer construction and method of manufacture
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/423, 296/39.1, 220/62.2, 160/370.1, 217/131
International ClassificationB61D17/18, B61D17/04
Cooperative ClassificationB61D17/18
European ClassificationB61D17/18