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Publication numberUS3025854 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 20, 1962
Filing dateSep 6, 1957
Priority dateSep 6, 1957
Publication numberUS 3025854 A, US 3025854A, US-A-3025854, US3025854 A, US3025854A
InventorsScholl William M
Original AssigneeScholl William M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger bandage and method of making the same
US 3025854 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 20, 1962 w. M. SCHOLL 3,025,854

FINGER BANDAGE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Sept. 6, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet l March 1962 w. M. SCHOLL 3,025,854

FINGER BANDAGE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Sept. 6, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 71 I a? Maw/v n2 rm/ 044 United States Patent Ofiice 3,025,354 Fatented Mar. 29, 1952 3,025,854 FINGER BANDAGE AND METHGD F MAKING THE AME William M. Scholi, 211-213 W. Schilier St., Chicago, Ill. Filed Sept. 6, 1957, Ser. No. 682,554 8 Claims. (Cl. 128-156) This invention relates to improvements in a finger bandage and method of making the same, and more particularly to a finger bandage highly desirable for use as a medical or surgical dressing on the fingers, toes, hands, feet, arms, and various other parts of the human body to cover and protect various forms of wounds or afflictions, although the invention may have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

In the past, many and various types of small bandages, commonly referred to as finger bandages, have been provided, but where these bandages embodied a pad, usually a piece of folded gauze to overlie the wound or affiiction, such pad did not give as much cushioning and shockabsorbing effect as desired, and such pads were not sufficiently waterproof. Frequently with bandages of the formerly known type where a waterproof backing was utilized, the pad itself would become wetted while bathing and remain in a soggy condition, since the backing prevented effective drying. Further, bandages developed heretofore were not as flexible as may be desired, and when placed on the inside of the joint would shortly become deeply grooved or wrinkled so as to improperly protect the wound or affliction and add materially to the discomfort of the user. In addition, it may be stated that bandages heretofore developed while many were provided with perforations and in some instances the backing strip was of relatively porous material the pad, especially if provided with a medicament, was not sufiiciently porous to provide adequate aeration for the wound or affliction to enable quicker healing. Also, it may be mentioned that bandages made heretofore were objectionably expensive, frequently so in construction, but more so by virtue of the fact that they had to be discarded and replaced too often.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a small bandage such as a finger bandage provided with a pad to overlie the wound or affliction, which pad is highly resilient and possesses great shock-absorbing powers to thereby effectively protect the injury from accidental bumps or abrasions.

Also, an object of this invention is the provision of a finger bandage or the like provided with a pad to overlie the wound or aflliction, and which padnot only possesses high cushioning properties, but is also absorbent and effectively aerates the afiiicted part.

A further object of the instant invention resides in the provision of a finger bandage or the like embodying a pad to overlie the afiiicted part, which pad is made of such material as to be extremely quick drying when wetted, so that in a very short time after wetting, the bandage is in the same condition as it was prior to wetting and there is no need to replace the bandage with a dry one.

Also a feature of this invention is the provision of a finger bandage or the like having a pad of foam-cushioning material thereon to overlie the afilicted area.

Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of a finger bandage or the like incorporating a pad of thermoplastic foam material that is extremely quick drying.

Still a further feature of the invention resides in the provision of a finger bandage or the like incorporating a cushioning pad of thermoplastic foam material having intercommunicating cells whereby the pad is ventilated in character and completely aerates the afilicted area at all times.

Still another object of the instant invention is the provision of a finger bandage or the like embodying a thermoplastic backing strip and a thermoplastic cushioning element heat sealed to the backing strip along a plurality of edges of the pad, the backing strip exclusive of the pad being provided with a pressure sensitive adhesive surface for attachment to the-body, if so desired.

It is another object of the instant invention to provide a finger bandage or the like embodying a backing strip having a pressure sensitive adhesive surface on one side, anda pad of foam material secured intermediately on the backing strip by said adhesive surface.

Still a further object of the instant invention is the provision of a new and novel method of making a finger bandage or the like.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a bandage embodying principles of the instant invention;

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view through the structure of FIG. 1 taken substantially as indicated by the line 11-11 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view, reduced in size, illustrating the under face of a bandage, and certain steps in the method of making the bandage;

FIG. 4 is a view similar in character to FIG. 3, but showing the under face of a bandage of slightly different construction and also indicating the method of making that bandage;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view through a bandage of still different construction, but embodying principles of the instant invention; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, greatly magnified bottom plan view of a portion of the bandage of FIG. 5.

As shown on the drawings:

While the instant invention is herein referred to as a finger bandage, since small bandages are commonly known by such nomenclature, it will be understood that the bandage may be made in various sizes and shapes for suitable application to various parts of the body other than the digits. Consequently, herein and in the appended claims, the term finger bandage is to be considered as inclusive of various shapes and sizes of small bandages for application to various parts of the body.

In the first illustrated embodiment of the instant invention, as seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, there is shown a finger bandage comprising a backing strip 1 which is pref erably a thermoplastic film. Any suitable thermoplastic film may be utilized, such as a polyvinyl chloride film, a cellulose acetate film, etc. Carried in an intermediate location, preferably centrally by the film, is a pad 2 which in use will be disposed over the particular wound or affliction being treated. In this embodiment of the invention, the pad is preferably a thermoplastic foam material capable of being heat sealed, and a polyvinyl chloride foam is highly satisfactory for this purpose. The polyvinyl chloride foam is a cellular foam, and the cells intercommunicate with each other and with the cells on the surface, so that air may pass through the structure and adequately aerate the affliction over which the pad is disposed. At the same time, the pad is highly resilient and has a great shock-absorbing power.

The pad is preferably united to the backing strip 1 by way of heat sealing, such as high frequency electronic heat sealing. Opposite ends of the pad are preferably heat sealed to the backing strip to provide heat seal seams 3--3. Otheiwise, the pad is unsecured to the backing strip and there is no adhesive utilized on the pad whatever. As seen in FIG. 2, the heat scaling is accomplished in such a manner that the marginal portions of the pad adjacent the heat seal seams 33 are curved inwardly toward the backing strip 1 and decrease in thickness to a fine edge at the very heat seal scam, as indicated at 4. Thus, there is no abrupt elevation at the edge of the pad when it is in use, and thus, the pad can be of substantially any thickness desired, a V8 inch thickness being satisfactory for most cases.

Beyond the ends of the pad, the backing strip 1 is provided with a pressure sensitive adhesive surface, as indicated at -5 by means of which the bandage may be attached to the body of the user. This pressure sensitive adhesive may be a rubber base adhesive and if used on the human body, preferably has a zinc oxide content. In order to protect the bandage until it is actually put to use, a pair of overlapping facing strips 6 and 7 may be attached to the respective adhesive surfaces and are of sufficient extent to overlie the pad 2 as well. It is a simple expedient to pull off these facing strips when it is desired to use the bandage. The facing strips may be of any suitable material, such as crinoline, an acetate film, or any other substance that will effectively protect the adhesive surfaces until use, but are readily strippable from those adhesive surfaces.

It should also be noted that the film backing strip 1 is preferably provided with a plurality of perforations 3 in the portion overlying the pad 2 so as to provide adequate ventilation and aeration for the afiliction covered by the pad. These perforations may be as numerous as desired and may extend through the pad itself, if desired, as shown in FIG. 2.

in use, the instant bandage is extremciy effective. it is simply necessary to place the pad 2 over whatever afiliction is to be covered, and press the adhesive surfaced end portions of the backing strip into firm engagement with the adjacent parts of the body. Should the wound be open and running, the pad will absorb the discharge and prevent it from being carried onto the clothing of the used. Since the pad is absorbent, medicament may be placed directly in the pad, if so desired. The foam cushioning material of which the pad is made is highly resilient and possesses great shock-absorbin properties whereby any accidental striking or rubbing against fixed objects will not, in most cases, aggravate the afiiiction. Further, since the pad has intercommunicatiug cells, whereby air may pass through the pad, and since the backing strip 1 has the perforations 3 therein, there Will be adequate ventilation for the afiiiction at all times to aid healing. It should also be especially noted that with the backing strip 1 of waterproof material, the body may be washed over the part where the bandage is applied, and even though the pad 2 may absorb water, a relatively light pressure upon the pad will force out most of this water immediately, and effective drying of the pad will only require a few minutes, whereby it is not necessary to remove the bandage and replace it with a new one in order to prevent the wound from having a wet application for several hours time. Still another important advantage of the instant invention resides in the fact that when the bandage is placed in a location where it is subject to bending, such as the inside of a finger joint or the like, there will be no objectionable wrinkling or constriction of the bandage, and particularly no such wrinkling of the bandage that Will not immediately correct itself when the joint is straightened. This is because the pad 2 is not secured to the backing strip 1 except at the heat seal seams 33, and so relative movement may occur between the confronting surfaces of the pad and the backing strip. All in all, the bandage is of such character as to more effectively and properly protect a wound or ailiiction than bandages of the same general character heretofore known.

The instant invention also lends itself to an economical process for making the bandage. With reference now to FIG. 3, it will be seen that it is simply necessary to lay out a sheet 1a of backing material and, if this sheet did not already have two spaced stripes of pressure sensitive adhesive 5-S thereon, apply the adhesive in that manner to the backing strip. An elongated strip 2a of cushioning material for the pads 2 may then be placed upon the strip, and with suitable dies or rollers, and preferably by an electronic high frequency process, heat seal seams 33 are provided to effectively anchor the cushion strip 2a to the backing strip between the adhesive areas 55. The heat sealing means are preferably of such character and shape as to provide the rounded margins 4- on the pad adjacent each heat seal seam. It is then only necessary to sever the assembly transversely as indicated by the dotted lines 9 in FIG. 3 to cut oif individual bandages of the character above described.

In FIG. 4, l have illustrated a bandage of slightly different construction, and also indicated the method of making that particular bandage. This bandage is the same as that above described, with the single exception that the pad 2 is also heat sealed at its side edges as Well as at its end edges to the backing strip. As seen in the lefthand portion of FIG. 4, the pad will have heat seal seams 1i?1t) along the side margins of the strip in addition to the transverse seams 3--3. The margins of the pad are prefer-ably rounded so as to curve with gradually decreasing thickness toward the heat seal seams 1010, as well as toward the seams 3-3.

In the making of this bandage, it is a simple expedient to lay out the assembly as described in connection with FIG. 3, and then simultaneously with or after the application of the heat seal scams 3, also provide transverse heat seal seams Na of substantially twice the width of the seams 3. This may be accomplished by utilizing a roller with properly spaced ribs thereon.

In FIGS. 5 and 6, I have illustrated a still different form of the instant invention, indicating how a bandage having a completely porous backing strip may be made in accordance with principles of this invention.

The bandage seen in FIG. 5 includes a fabric backing strip 11 having a pressure sensitive adhesive surface throughout as indicated at 12. A pad 13, which may be of the same material as the pad 2 herein above described, is attached to the backing strip 11 and held thereto by the pressure sensitive adhesive surface 12. Suitable temporary protective elements 14 and 15, overlapping the pad, may be utilized to protect the adhesive surface 12 until it is desired to apply the bandage.

In this instance, however, the pad 13 need not be of thermoplastic foam of a character susceptible to heat sealing, but may be of substantially any desired type of foam cushioning material having intercommunicating cells. Thus, 'it might be of polyurethane foam or even foam latex.

The backing strip 11 is preferably of a porous woven fabric of which the individual threads may be of any suitable material, organic or inorganic. As seen best in the greatly magnified showing of FIG. 6, there are pores or openings 16 in the fabric itself, and this fabric is very porous to air, although the pores may be sufiiciently'firie that the fabricwill not effectively pass liquid. It should also be noted that the adhesive 12 is preferably applied in such a manner as to leave open portions 17 therein at spaced intervals. Preferably, each opening 17 in theadhesive is of a greater size than a plurality of the pores 16 in the fabric backing. Thus, the adhesive itself is porous and admits air to the body of a user, yet the fabric is of suificient fineness to screen out dirt and the like. Thus, the resultant bandage is porous throughout its entire length and is desirable for use particularly with a person whose skin is sensitive to with FIGS. 1 and 2, although it does not have the nonwrinkling property of the previously described bandage, nor is it as effectively waterproof. It does have a different advantage, however, in that it is porous throughout its entire length.

Obviously, the bandage in FIG. 5 may be made in a method similar to that above described, it being only necessary to provide a sheet of backing material covered with pressure sensitive adhesive having the openings 17 therein, apply an elongated strip of cushioning material 13 across the intermediate portion of it, and then slice the assembly transversely to cut out individual bandages.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided a new and novel bandage of the finger bandage type, possessing the advantages not capable of production by similar bandages heretofore known, and also a practical and economical method of making such bandages.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be elfected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. A finger bandage comprising a thermoplastic film backing strip and a thermoplastic foam pad of lesser length than said strip, a plurality of heat seal seams securing edges only of said pad directly to said strip, the interfaces of the pad and the strip being unsecured so that wrinkling is prevented where the strip is applied against a skin fold or the like, air vent means in said strip in register with said pad and intercommunicating cells in said pad also communicating with said air vent means in said strip permitting said bandage to be dried by compression thereof.

2. A finger bandage comprising a thermoplastic film backing strip and a thermoplastic foam pad of lesser length than said strip, a heat seal seam at each end edge of said end edges of the pad directly securing said pad to said strip, the pad and strip being unsecured between said seams so that wrinkling is prevented where the strip is applied against a skin fold or the like, air vent means in said strip in register with said pad and intercommunieating cells in said pad also communicating with said air vent means in said strip permitting said bandage to be dried by compression thereof.

3. A finger bandage, comprising a thermoplastic film backing strip, and a thermoplastic foam pad of lesser length than said strip heat sealed to said strip entirely around said pad.

4. A finger bandage, comprising a thermoplastic film backing strip, and a thermoplastic foam pad of lesser length than said strip defining with said strip means for aerating said pad, a plurality of heat-seal seams securing said pad to said strip by direct fusion of the pad and the strip and with portions of the strip extending beyond the ends of the pad, and said strip carrying pressure sensitive adhesive on the portions thereof beyond the ends of said pad.

5. A finger bandage, comprising a thermoplastic film backing strip, and a thermoplastic foam pad of lesser length than said strip, a plurality of heat-seal seams securing said pad to said strip along a plurality of edges of the pad, said strip carrying pressure sensitive adhesive beyond the ends of said pad, said strip being devoid of adhesive beneath said pad, and said pad being free from said strip except at the heat seal seams to prevent wrinkling of the pad when the pad is applied against a skin fold or the like.

6. A finger bandage, comprising a thermoplastic film backing strip, and a thermoplastic foam pad of lesser length than said strip, a plurality of heat-seal seams securing said pad to said strip by direct fusion of the pad and the strip and with portions of the strip extending beyond the ends of the pad, and said strip carrying pressure sensitive adhesive on the portions thereof beyond the ends of said pad, said pad being much thicker than said film strip, and the marginal portion of said pad being curved and decreasing in thickness to a fine edge at the heat seal seam areas thereof, said pad providing a plurality of intercommunicating cells to aerate the same and said seams securing said pad in a manner to substantially prevent wrinkling thereof,

7. The method of making finger bandages, including the steps of placing a strip of thermoplastic foam intermediately on a wider strip of thermoplastic film, heat sealing and directly fusing the strips together along the side margins of the foam strip, applying pressure sensitive adhesive to the film beyond the sides of the foam strip, and cutting transversely through the assembly to sever individual bandages along lines perpendicular to the heat-seal seams formed by said heat sealing.

8. The method of making finger bandages, including the steps of placing a strip of thermoplastic foam intermediately on a wider strip of thermoplastic film, heat sealing the strips together along the side margins of the foam strip, contemporaneously heat sealing the strips together to provide spaced transverse heat seal seams between the seams at the side margins of the foam strip, applying pressure sensitive adhesive to the film beyond the sides of the foam strip, and severing the assembly transversely with the lines of cut passing centrally through the transverse heat seal seams to provide individual bandages.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,145,755 Dickson Jan. 31, 1939 2,292,995 Greenwoll Aug. 11, 1942 2,560,712 Bell July 17, 1951 2,592,801 Hanington Apr. 15, 1952 2,626,886 Scholl Jan. 27, 1953 2,734,503 Doyle Feb. 15, 1956 2,740,401 Crawford Apr. 3, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 727,180 Great Britain Mar. 30, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2145755 *Sep 13, 1937Jan 31, 1939Johnson & JohnsonSurgical dressing
US2292995 *Oct 25, 1940Aug 11, 1942Scholl Mfg Co IncBandage assembly
US2560712 *Mar 11, 1949Jul 17, 1951Lewis B BellBandage for varicose ulcer treatment
US2592801 *Oct 20, 1949Apr 15, 1952Hanington Charles AAdhesive bandage material
US2626886 *Nov 22, 1949Jan 27, 1953William M SchollLaminated sheet and method of making same
US2734503 *Aug 9, 1952Feb 14, 1956 Heat sterilizable elastic
US2740401 *Jan 14, 1954Apr 3, 1956Scholl Mfg Co IncFoot corrective pad
GB727180A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3122141 *Mar 29, 1962Feb 25, 1964Johnson & JohnsonFlexible absorbent sheet
US3122142 *May 27, 1963Feb 25, 1964Johnson & JohnsonAbsorbent product
US3156242 *Mar 29, 1962Nov 10, 1964Johnson & JohnsonFlexible absorbent sheet
US3927669 *Nov 16, 1973Dec 23, 1975Linda R GlattBandage construction
US4328968 *Apr 4, 1980May 11, 1982Chuck HackerProtective pad for the thumb hole of a bowling ball
US4377159 *Jun 29, 1981Mar 22, 1983Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyPressure bandages and methods for making the same
US5571079 *Dec 30, 1994Nov 5, 1996Algos Pharmaceutical CorporationWound dressing
US5716621 *Jul 3, 1996Feb 10, 1998Pharmadyn, Inc.Nonocclusive drug delivery device and process for its manufacture
US6018092 *Mar 4, 1997Jan 25, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyLine of separation to faciliate manual separation of the bandage into smaller bandages, notch in back at end of line; package retains the bandage therein when the package is torn and the bandage is separated along a line of separation
US7249385 *Sep 20, 2004Jul 31, 2007Richard SchukraftFinger/toe tip protective apparatus
EP0120612A2 *Feb 27, 1984Oct 3, 1984Johnson & Johnson Products Inc.Blister pad adhesive bandage
EP0676183A1 *Apr 7, 1995Oct 11, 1995JOHNSON & JOHNSON CONSUMER PRODUCTS, INC.Conformable adhesive bandages
WO2000019947A1 *Sep 27, 1999Apr 13, 2000Ben HatamAn adhesive strip
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/46, 602/59
International ClassificationA61F13/10, A61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0203, A61F13/105
European ClassificationA61F13/10H2, A61F13/02B