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Publication numberUS3026579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1962
Filing dateAug 20, 1959
Priority dateAug 20, 1959
Publication numberUS 3026579 A, US 3026579A, US-A-3026579, US3026579 A, US3026579A
InventorsGeorge T Carter
Original AssigneeGeorge T Carter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storm sash for awning type windows
US 3026579 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 27, 1962 G. T. CARTER 3,026,579

STORM SASH FOR AWNING TYPE WINDOWS Filed Aug. 20, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. GEORGE 'l'. CARTER BY MAHONEY M1LLER&RAMBO, ATTY 5.

March 27, 1962 G. r. CARTER STORM SASI-I FOR AWNING TYPE wmnows 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 20, 1959 INVENTOR. GEORGE T. CARTER MAHONEY MILLER & R%M?, ATTY S United States My invention relates to storm sash for awning type windows. It has to do, more particularly, with a storm sash which can be applied directly to the outside of a swingable sash of an awning type window in such a manner that it will be sealed thereon without interfering with the sealing of adjacent swingable sash of the window.

In the past, most storm sash for awning type windows have been applied inside the window and, therefore, must be removed during hot weather to permit substitution of screens, with all the attendant problems of removal, replacement and storage. The reason for using inside storm sash is the difficulty of applying storm sash to the outer side of the window in such a manner that it will not interfere with the normal sealing of the window sash itself or the closing or opening thereof. This difficulty occurs mainly at each interfitting joint between the lower edge of an upper sash and the upper edge of an adjacent lower sash. These edges move into interfitting relationship as the swingable window sash are closed so that narrow lips overlap each other and provide the seal. Therefore, there is no room adjacent these lips to provide storm sash frame members. Attempts have been made to overcome this difiiculty by applying an extra or intermediate master frame to the outer side of the window sash for receiving the storm sash, but this is expensive and gives bulk to the swingable sash and does not completely cover and seal the swinga-ble sash.

The present invention overcomes all the above-indicated disadvantages by providing a storm sash on the outer side of the swingable sash, without the use of an intermediate master frame, which will be effectively sealed on the swingable sash, which will not interfere with the sealing of the swingable sash next above but will actually aid in the sealing thereof, and which will not interfere with closing or opening of the window sash.

Various other objects will be apparent.

In the accompanying drawings, I have illustrated the preferred embodiment of my invention and in these drawmgs:

FIGURE 1 is an isometric view, partly broken away, of an awning type Window having storm sash applied thereto according to my invention, the window sash being swung to open position.

FIGURE 2 is a similar view but showing the window sash in closed position.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view showing details of the storm sash.

FIGURE 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 55 of FIGURE 4.

With reference to the drawings, and especially to FIGURES l and 2, my invention is shown applied to an awning type window of the usual type which is preferably made of metal and which includes a frame 10. Window sash are mounted on the frame for sliding vertical movement and for simultaneous swinging movement in the usual manner. As they open, they swing outwardly and slide downwardly and as they close, they swing inwardly and slide upwardly. In this example, I have shown two window sash which are the upper sash 11 and the lower sash 12. However, it is to be understood that my invention is applicable to awning type windows having various numbers of swingable window sash. The sash 11 and 12 are swung between open and closed positions ice relative to the frame 10 by the usual linkage 13 actuated by the crank type operator 14.

When the swingable sash 11 and 12 are in closed position, they are sealed in a manner shown best in FIGURE 3. The upper sash 11 has a lower rail 15 which is provided with a depending inner sealing lip 16 and a depending outer or forward sealing lip 17. The lower sash 12 has an upper rail 18 which is provided with an upstanding inner or rear sealing flange 19 which has a sealing gasket 20 at its upper end on its forward surface for engaging the lip 16. This rail 18 also has an outer or forward lip 21 for cooperating with the lip 17 which extends downwardly thereover. All of the joints between adjacent window sash of the window are formed in this manner regardless of number of sash used in the window.

The uppermost edge of the upper sash 11 is sealed in a somewhat different manner. The upper rail 24 of the frame 10 is provided with a depending inner sealing lip 25 that carries a gasket 26 on its forward face which cooperates with the rear surface of an upstanding flange 27 formed at the inner side of the top rail 28 of the sash 11. This member 24 also carries a drip strip 29 which has an inverted channel 30 in which the outer upstanding flange 31 on the sash rail 28 upwardly projects. Thus, when the sash 11 is in closed position, it is effectively sealed at both its upper and lower edges.

The structure so far described is the usual awning type window structure. Because of the swinging and vertical movement of the window sash, it is difficult to apply storm windows thereto in such a manner as not to interfere with the proper, normal sealing of the window sash. This is especially true at the horizontal joint between adjacent window sash since space is limited at that joint and the storm sash must not interfere with the smooth movement of the adjacent edges 'of the window sash into interfitting relationship during closing and sealing of the adjacent sash. Also, the storm sash must not interfere with the opening of the window sash when they move out of the interfitting relationship. According to my invention, the storm sash is applied to the swingable window sash without causing interference with the closing and sealing thereof or with the opening thereof.

According to my invention, each window sash 11 and 12 has a storm sash 35 applied thereto. The cooperating storm sash 35 is applied directly to the outer surface of the frame of each window sash. The details of the storm sash 35 are shown best in FIGURES 3 to 5.

The frame of each storm sash is also preferably made of metal and is of U-outline, having the two upstanding vertical side rails 37 and the lower horizontal side rail 38 which are grooves to receive the cooperating edges of a window panel 39 which is preferably formed of glass. It will be noted from the drawings that the glass panel 39 projects upwardly a slight distance beyond the upper ends of the associated side rails 37 of the storm sash frame and that this upper edge is not provided with an associated frame side rail. At the inner surface of each of the storm sash frame sides or rails, a sealing gasket 41 is mounted which will engage the outer surface of the associated window frame. The storm sash may be mounted on the window sash in various ways but preferably at its lower rail 38, it is hinged by hinges 42 to the adjacent portion of the window sash. The storm sash may be normally secured in sealing contact with the Window sash frame 26 by means of clip type fasteners 43 pivotally disposed on the window sash and cooperating with the storm sash frame sides 37 adjacent their upper ends. Thus, normally the storm sash is disposed fiat against the outer side of the window sash in sealing relationship thereto, as shown on the lower window sash in FIGURE 1. However, it may be swung outwardly away 3 from the window sash about the hinges 42 as shown on the upper window sash in FIGURE 1.

At the upper edge of each storm sash a sealing gasket 45 is provided. This gasket may be in the form of a flexible strip which is preferably extruded from plastic or rubber. It comprises a lower inverted channel portion 36 which slips over the upper free edge of the window panel 39. It will be noted that this gasket strip 45 is of greater length than the associated edge of the panel 39 and extends over the upper ends of the side rail members 37 of the storm sash and outwardly beyond said members 37. The member 45 has the flexible sealing flange 47 upstanding from the chanel portion 46 thereof. This flange 47 preferably tapers to a knife edge 48 at its upper extremity. The flange 47 will thus be flexible and its flexibility will be increased toward its upper extremity.

It will be noted best in FIGURE 3 that the gasket 45 on the upper edge of each storm sash will extend upwardly over the adjacent face or outer surface of the associated horizontal sealing lip of the window sash on which the storm sash is mounted. It will further be noted that when the upper and lower sash are closed, the upstanding flange 47 of the gasket will extend over the sealing lip 21 of the rail 18 at the top of the window sash 12. It will extend beneath the depending lip 17 at the lower edge of the window sash 11 which will overlap the lip 21 when the two sash are in closed position. Thus, the flexible flange 47 will be tightly gripped between the lips 17 and 21 and will provide a seal across the upper edge of the storm sash. Furthermore, the flange 47 will act as a seal between the upper window lip 17 and the lower window lip 21 providing another seal at the interfitting joint between the window sash 11 and 12. The normal seal is provided at the gasket 20 and there will be no interference with this seal by the flange 47 which is sufliciently thin to prevent this. It will further be noted that between the channel portion 46 of the gasket and the point where the flange 47 is gripped between the lips 17 and 21, there is a channel 49a provided behind it which will be open at its outer ends to serve as a breathing channel for the space 49 between the storm sash window panel 39 and the associated panel 58 of the window sash.

Although the greatest difliculty has been encountered in the past at the interfitting joint between adjacent window sash in connection with the application of storm windows to this type of awning window, this difliculty has been overcome with my storm sash structure and particularly by the provision of the sealing gasket 45 that is associated with the upper edge of the storm sash on the lower window sash 12. However, the gasket 45 on the upper edge of the storm sash carried by the upper Window sash 11 will extend upwardly over the face of the associated flange 31 on the horizontal upper rail 28 of the window sash frame, as indicated in FIGURE 3, beneath the drip strip 29 provided at the upper end of the frame 10.

It will be apparent from the above description that my invention provides a storm sash which can be mounted directly on the outer face of the swingable sash of an awning type window. With my storm sash arrangement,

the use of an intermediate master frame is not necessary. The storm sash is so mounted on the window sash that it will not interfere with the normal sealing of the window sash in the frame and especially at the horizontal interfitting joint between two adjacent upper and lower swingable window sash. One of the important elements of my structure is the provision of the sealing gasket or strip which slips over the exposed upper edge of the window panel and extends over the side frame rails of the supporting U-shaped storm sash frame. This gasket has the upstanding flexible flange which overlaps the sealing lip at the adjacent outer face of the window sash frame and, in the case of the interfitting joint is clamped between the two overlapping lips of the upper and lower swingable window sash when the upper and lower sash are swung into closed position. Furthermore, this sealing gasket will not interfere with the normal sealing engagement of the overlapping lips of the window sash adjacent the inner face thereof.

Many of the advantages of my storm sash structure have been discussed above and others will be readily apparent.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In combination with an awning type window having a main frame carrying upper and lower window sash which swing and slide relatively in their closing and opening movements and meet at a sealing joint in closed position, each of said window sash including upper and lower rails and two vertical stiles with a window panel enclosed thereby, said joint including a depending rigid outer flange on the lower rail of the upper sash and a rigid outer lip on the upper rail of the lower sash, said depending outer flange extending downwardly over and overlapping the outer lip when the window sash are closed, a storm sash applied directly to the outer surfaces of the rails and stiles of said lower sash and embodying a frame having two vertical stiles and a lower horizontal rail with a window panel carried thereby and which is exposed at its upper edge and said edge being below said outer rigid lip, and a sealing gasket applied to said window panel upper edge and having a flexible upstanding flange which, when the window sash are swung into closed position to bring said outer rigid flange over said outer rigid lip, will extend upwardly over said lip and beneath said outer flange.

2. The combination of claim 1 in which the sealing gasket has a lower inverted channel portion which slips over the upper edge of the window panel of the storm sash and said flexible upstanding flange extends upwardly from said channel portion.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,296,985 Cresswell Sept. 29, 1942 2,622,672 Thomas Dec. 23, 1952 2,654,918 Lemos Oct. 13, 1953 2,711,789 Boyle et al. June 28, 1955 2,831,220 Nuebel Apr. 22, 1958 2,883,716 Kunkel Apr. 28, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2296985 *Dec 26, 1940Sep 29, 1942Cresswell Charles TWindow installation
US2622672 *Dec 5, 1945Dec 23, 1952Gate City Sash And Door CompanAwning type window
US2654918 *Mar 26, 1949Oct 13, 1953Anthony G LemosWindow
US2711789 *Oct 4, 1952Jun 28, 1955Kenneth E BoyleCombined screen and storm window
US2831220 *May 23, 1955Apr 22, 1958Nuebel GottliebWindow construction
US2883716 *Oct 13, 1954Apr 28, 1959Aloysius T KunkelAuxiliary window panel and fastener therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3184801 *Apr 2, 1962May 25, 1965Julian C RenfroTrim unit for facilitating the installation of lightweight window units
US3421259 *Aug 19, 1966Jan 14, 1969Broward Hurricane Panel Co IncStorm shutters
US3780473 *Aug 13, 1969Dec 25, 1973Alsco Anaconda IncThermal barrier window
US6478072 *Jun 21, 2001Nov 12, 2002Raymond L. AllmanSolar screen mounting for an awning window
WO1989009867A1 *Apr 12, 1989Oct 19, 1989Gordon OkumotoSun filter for a louver panel
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/62, 49/490.1, 49/91.1, 49/161
International ClassificationE06B3/04, E06B3/26
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/2615, E06B3/2605
European ClassificationE06B3/26C