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Publication numberUS3027045 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1962
Filing dateMay 11, 1961
Priority dateMay 11, 1961
Publication numberUS 3027045 A, US 3027045A, US-A-3027045, US3027045 A, US3027045A
InventorsWilson James D
Original AssigneeBanner Metals Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Meat lug
US 3027045 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 27, 1962 J. D. WILSON MEAT LUG Filed May 11, 1961 tates The present invention relates to stackable-nestable lug or tote box containers for the transportation and storage, for example, of meats, fruits, vegetables, and the like; and which are formed of imperforate sheet metal, such as aluminum, or have a molded plastic construction.

The containers of the present invention are intended under normal circumstances to have an open top, and they are constructed so that they can be stacked on top of one another without imposing the weight of the upper container upon the contents of a lower container. Moreover, the containers of the invention are constructed so that when empty, they may be nested together for space conservation, and for ease of handling, storing and transporting back to their point of origin.

In the handling, storing, transportation and marketing of meats, and other materials or produce, by containers of the type under consideration, it is most desirable that the containers be constructed so that they may be stacked one on top of the other without damage to the contents of the individual containers. It is also important that the containers under consideration be constructed so that they may be stacked in a simple and convenient manner; and so that the resulting stack of containers is stable, and there is no tendency for the individual containers in the stack to move with respect to one another.

in addition, and as mentioned above, it is most important that the containers under consideration be constructed so that they may be telescoped into a nested relationship with one another when they are empty. This nesting capability of the containers facilitates the storage and transportation of the empty containers.

An important object of the present invention is, therefore, to provide an improved and unique container of the nestable-stackable type and which is constructed to fulfill all the requirements mentioned in the preceding paragraphs.

Another object of the invention is to provide such an improved container which is rugged in its construction, which may be stacked or nested with other like containers without the need for any moving bails or other parts, and by which such stacking and nesting may be carried out simply and conveniently and without the need for undue manipulation of the individual containers.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide such side walls outwardly so that a corresponding channel, or concave flute, is formed on the inside of each side wall of the container in conformity with each of the convex flutes on the outer surface.

Also in the embodiment to be described, a pair of shoul ders is formed in the flanged upper rim of the container adjacent the upper end of each of the concave flutes referred to in the preceding paragraph, but laterally displaced therefrom. The shoulders of each pair are positioned on opposite sides of the corresponding concave flute.

The container mentioned briefly in the preceding paragraphs, and embodying the concepts of the invention, is constructed so that a plurality of like containers can be nested within one another. This nesting is achieved merely by aligning the above mentioned convex flutes of an upper container, in each instance, with the corresponding concave flutes of a lower container. This permits the convex flutes oi the upper container to slide down into nested relationship within the concave flutes of the lower container.

On the other hand, the like containers embodying the concepts of the invention can be stacked in a simple and convenient manner, merely by displacing an upper container slightly in a lateral direction and with respect to a lower container. This displacement is such that the lower an improved container which is relatively simple in its 7 construction, and which may be produced at a relatively low cost by a simple forming or molding operation.

The improved meat lug type of container embodying the concepts of the present invention and constituting the embodiment to be described has an open top, and it has a rectangular configuration. The upper rim of the embodiment to be described is provided with a flanged configuration so as to facilitate handling. The side walls of the container to be described are flared outwardly from the bottom to the top to permit nesting of like containers within one another. In other words, the bottom of the container is somewhat smaller in length and width than the top, so that the sides of the container flare outwardly as they extend upwardly.

A pair of convex vertical ribs, or flutes, is formed on the outer surface of each side wall of the container to be described. The flutes of each pair are respectively disposed near the corresponding end walls, and they extend upwardly from the bottom of the container to the top. The flutes are formed by configuring the material of the ends of the convex flutes of the upper container rest on one or the other of the sets of shoulders in the flanged upper rim of the lower container.

When a plurality of like containers, of the type under consideration, are to be stacked; it is usually preferably to stagger successive containers in the stack, as will be described, to provide over-all stability in the stack. However, when the containers are to be supported in an inclined position, they may be stacked in a manner such that each successive container is displaced slightly in a particular direction from the next lower container.

A horizontal rib, or bead, may be provided in each of the two side walls of the containers. These beads are positioned adjacent the upper rims of the side walls, and spaced from and parallel with the rims. These horizontal beads serve to engage the upper rim of a lower container when the containers are nested within one another. The beads prevent jamming of these nested containers, and also serve to displace the upper flanges of the nested containers from one another to facilitate the manual grasping of the flanges and thereby aid in the removal of the individual containers from their nested relationship.

The features of the invention which are believed to be new are set forth in the claims. The invention itself, however, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following specification when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

IGURE 1 is a perspective view of a meat lug container constructed in accordance with one of the embodiments of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view of a plurality of containers, similar to the container of FIGURE 1, mounted on one another in a stacked relationship to form a stack of containers; and

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view of a plurality of containers, similar to the container of FIGURE 1, nested within one another.

The container of the illustrated embodiment shown in the drawings is designated generally as lil in FIGURE 1. The container 16 includes a bottom 12., and a pair of outwardly flared side walls 14 and 16 which are formed integral with the bottom and which extend upwardly from the bottom. The container 10 also includes a pair of outwardly flared end walls 18 and 20. These end walls are formed integral with the bottom 12 and with the side wall 16, and they also extend upwardly from the bottom.

A pair of upwardly extending flutes 22 and 24 is formed in the side wall 14, and a corresponding pair of upwardly extending flutes 26 and 28 is formed in the side wall 16. These flutes, as illustrated in FIGURE 1, are disposed adjacent respective ones of the end walls 18 and 20. The flutes are formed by configuring the side walls, and they have a convex configuration on the outer surfaces of the respective side walls, and a concave configuration on the inner surfaces. As shown, the flutes have an elongated configuration, and the lower end of each flute is tapered inwardly to the outer surface of the corresponding side wall.

The container in FIGURE 1 has an integral flange 30 which extends peripherally around its upper rim. The flange 30 extends outwardly from the corresponding plane of the end walls and side walls to form a convenient means for grasping the container.

The inner surface of the flange 30 has respective grooves formed therein in vertical alignment with corresponding ones of the flutes 22, 24, 2.6 and 28, so that vertical concave channels are formed by the grooves in the flange and by the inner surfaces of the respective flutes, which channels extend downwardly from the upper extremity of the container down to a point adjacent the bottom 12.

The flange 30 also has a pair of notches 34 and 36 formed in its inner surface adjacent each of the flutes 22, 24, 26 and 28. As illustrated, the upper extremity of the inner portion of each fiute has a first notch 34 disposed on one side and displaced laterally from its vertical axis, and each has a notch 36 disposed on the opposite side also displaced laterally from its vertical axis. Each of the notches 34 and 36 forms a shoulder with the corresponding side wall.

I The side walls 14 and 16 also have a pair of horizontal beads 40 and 42 formed therein. These heads have an elongated configuration, as shown, and they extend in spaced, parallel relationship with the flange 30. The heads have a convex configuration with respect to the outer surface of the corresponding side walls, and they serve to support the container 10 on the upper rim of a lower container when the container is nested with a like container, as will be described.

In FIGURE 2, the container 10 of FIGURE 1 is illustrated as being stacked on a plurality of like containers, designated 10a, 10b, 10c and 1nd. As shown, the container 10 is displaced laterally with respect to the con tainer 10a, so that the bottoms of the flutes 22, 24, 26 and 28 will rest in the shoulders formed in the notches of the container lila corresponding to the notches 34.

In like manner, the container ltla is displaced laterally in the opposite direction, with respect to the container 1%, so that the bottoms of its flutes (corresponding to the flutes 22, 24, 26 and 28) will rest in the shoulders of the notches corresponding to the notches 36 in the container 10b.

It is evident, therefore, that the container 10 may be stacked on like containers to form a stack of containers, merely by displacing successive containers in the stack slightly in a lateral direction, so that the bottoms of the flutes of an upper container will rest in either the notches 34 or the notches 36 of a lower container.

It will be appreciated, that when the bottom ends of the flutes of an upper container extend down into the notches 34 or 36 of a lower container, that the upper container is firmly and rigidly held against lateral motion by its engagement with the lower container. It will also be appreciated that a stack of containers, such as the stack of FIGURE 2 may be formed, when the stack is to be supported on a horizontal surface. However, the containers may be stacked in an offset manner, by a lateral displacement in the same direction between successive containers in the stack, when the stack is to he supported in a sloping plane.

The illustration of FIGURE 3 shows the containers 10, 10a, 10b, 10c and 10d of FIGURE 2 placed in a nested relationship. To accomplish this, it is merely necessary for an upper container to be vertically aligned with a lower container, so that the flutes 22, 24, 26 and 28 of an upper container may move down into telescopic relationship with the inner surfaces of the corresponding flutes of a lower container. When the containers are in the nested relationship, the beads 40 and 42 of an upper container rest on the upper surface of the rim 30 of a lower container. These beads serve to prevent jamming of an upper container into a lower container. They also serve to displace successive rims 30 from one another, so that the top container can be removed easily from the nested group, merely by grasping the displaced rim 30 of the particular container.

The invention provides, therefore, a rigid and rugged container which may be used as a lug or tote box for meat, produce or other articles. As noted above, the container may be composed of sheet metal or plastic. The container has the feature, that it may be conveniently stacked or nested, and this is achieved without moving par-ts. Instead, the container is configured so that it may be stacked with like containers in a rigid and stable stack, merely by offsetting successive ones of the containers laterally with respect to one another. In addition, the container may be nested with other similar containers, merely by aligning it vertically with a lower container, and allowing it to slip down into the lower container.

What is claimed is:

1. A nestable and stackable container including: a bottom, a pair of outwardly flared side walls extending upwardly from said hottom, a pair of outwardly flared end walls extending upwardly from said bottom and defining an open top with said side walls, a plurality of upwardly extending flutes formed in said side walls individually having a convex configuration on the outer surface of the corresponding side wall and a concave configuration on the inner surface of the corresponding side wall, said flutes receiving the corresponding flute of a similar vertically aligned container for nesting purposes, the upper rim of the container having a flanged configuration and having notches formed in the inner side thereof adjacent the upper end of respective ones of said flutes but displaced laterally therefrom, each of said notches having a shoulder at the lower end thereof for receiving the lower ends of the flutes of a similar vertically misaligned container to permit the lower ends of the flutes of the similar container each to rest on a corresponding one of the shoulders for stacking purposes, with the bottom of the similar container extending down into said open top and said similar container being restrained from relative lateral movement by the engagement of said lower ends of the flutes thereof with corresponding ones of said notches.

2. The container defined in claim 1 and in which said flanged upper rim has a pair of said notches at the inner surface thereof and disposed on opposite sides of the upper ends of each of said flutes.

3. The container defined in claim 1 and which includes a pair of elongated convex beads formed in the outer surface of respective ones of said side walls in spaced parallel relationship with respect to said upper rim to engage the rim of a similar lower container so as to limit the extent of nesting therewith.

4. A nestable and stackable container including: a bottom, a pair of outwardly flared side Walls extending upwardly from said bottom, a pair of outwardly flared end walls extending upwardly from said bottom and defining an open top with said side walls, a plurality of upwardly extending flutes formed in said side walls for receiving the corresponding flutes of a similar vertically aligned container for nesting purposes, and notch means defining shoulders displaced downwardly from the top of the container and disposed adjacent the upper end of said flutes but displaced laterally therefrom for receiving the lower ends of the flutes of a similar vertically misaligned container to permit the lower ends of the flutes of the similar container to rest on said shoulders for stacking purposes with the bottom of the similar container extending into said open top and said similar container being constrained from relative lateral movement by the engagement of the lower end of the flutes thereof with said notch means.

5. A tapered rectangular nestable and stackable container including: a bottom, a pair of outwardly flared side walls formed integral with said bottom and extending upwardly therefrom, a pair of outwardly flared end walls formed integral with said bottom and extending upwardly therefrom and formed integral with said side walls and defining therewith an open top, a pair of upwardly extending flutes formed in each of said side walls adjacent respective ones of said end walls, each of said flutes having a convex configuration on the outer surface of the corresponding side wall and each having a concave configuration on the inner surface of the corresponding side wall for receiving the corresponding flutes of a similar vertically aligned container for nesting purposes, a rim member formed integral with said end walls and said side walls and extending around the upper periphery of the container, said rim member having channels formed therein on the inner surface thereof in communication with the concave portion of respective ones of said flutes and said rim member having notches formed on the inner surface thereof adjacent the upper end of respective ones of said flutes but laterally displaced with respect thereto, each of said notches defining a shoulder at the lower end thereof for receiving the lower ends of the flutes of a similar vertically misaligned container to permit the lower ends of the flutes of the similar container to rest on said shoulders for stacking purposes, with the bottom of the similar container extending into said open top and said similar container being constrained from relative lateral movement by the engagement of the lower ends of the flutes thereof with corresponding ones of said notches.

6. The container defined in claim 5 and in which said rim member has a pair of said notches disposed on opposite sides of the upper ends of each of said flutes.

7. The container defined in claim 5 and in which said side walls have a pair of convex beads formed in the respective outer surfaces thereof, said beads extending longitudinally in spaced parallel relationship with said rim to limit the nesting of the container with a similar container.

8. The container defined in claim 5 and in which said bottom, side walls and end walls are all formed of a sheet metal material.

9. The container defined in claim 5 and in which said bottom and side walls and end walls are all formed of a plastic material.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/505, D03/314
International ClassificationB65D21/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/048
European ClassificationB65D21/04F