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Publication numberUS3027587 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1962
Filing dateOct 12, 1959
Priority dateOct 12, 1959
Publication numberUS 3027587 A, US 3027587A, US-A-3027587, US3027587 A, US3027587A
InventorsHarry Bierstock
Original AssigneeHarry Bierstock
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner floor sweepings pick-up baseboard apparatus
US 3027587 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 3, 1962 H. BIERSTOCK VACUUM CLEANER FLOOR SWEEPINGS PICK-UP BASEBOARD APPARATUS Filed Oct. 12, 1959 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. fl/leer 5/5252? A 77018 N EY April 3, 1962 H. BIERSTOCK VACUUM CLEANER FLOOR SWEEPINGS PICK-UP BASEBOARD APPARATUS Filed Oct. 12, 1959 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 2 WM 5 v/ a M ATTOAZA/E Y April 3, 1962 H. BIERSTOCK 3,027,587

VACUUM CLEANER FLOOR SWEEPINGS PICK-UP BASEBOARD APPARATUS Filed Oct. 12, 1959 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 3,027,587 Patented Apr. 3, 1962 3,827,587 VACUUM CLEANER FLOOR SWEEPINGS PICK-UP BASEBGARD APPARATUS Harry Bier-stock, 47 Albert St., Waterloo, (Intario, Canada Fiied Get. 12, 1%9, Ser. No. 845,988 18 Claims. (Cl. 15-301) This invention relates to a vacuum cleaner floor sweeping pick-up baseboard apparatus and has for an object to provide an apparatus which may be located behind and extending through a baseboard for cooperation with a temporarily or permanently stored vacuum cleaner for readily picking up the sweepings of a floor, and which may be activated and deactivated by the foot of the sweeper without the necessity of stooping down to the apparatus.

A further object of this invention is to provide an apparatus which eliminates the necessity of a dust pan and brush for picking up sweepings, but instead, makes use of the conventional vacuum cleaner normally stored in a home when not in use, for its customary cleaning operation, which apparatus is normally foot-operated for activating or deactivating it, so that the housewife may dispose of the floor sweepings by merely sweeping the dust and litter to the vicinity of the apparatus of this invention and then with the foot, activate this apparatus to dispose of the dust and litter, and then deactivate it without stooping or bending down.

A further object of this invention is to provide sweepings pick-up apparatus which, in effect, is an in situ attachment for a conventional vacuum cleaner of substantiaily any type, so that the vacuum cleaner can be readily attached thereto when stored away, and can be as readily detached therefrom for conventional use, although the vacuum cleaner may be left as a permanent installation, if desired.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a sweepings pick-up apparatus wherein a pick-up nozzle device is available through an aperture in the baseboard of a room or cabinet, handy to the floor being swept, and the remainder of the apparatus is in the cabinet or behind the baseboard wall, or in a closet, or even in a storage space or area further distant from the nozzle device, such as a cellar or elsewhere.

A further object of this invention is to provide a sweepings pick-up apparatus which may be located in the forwardly extending baseboard of a room wall, or in the rearwardly recessed baseboard of a kitchen or other cabinet, such recessed baseboard often being known as a toe or kick space.

In brief, this sweepings pick-up apparatus is particularly intended for use in connection with any room, usually the kitchen, of a home which has to be swept rather than be cleaned by a vacuum cleaner, and where the sweepings must usually be picked up by a dust pan and brush. With this invention, such dust pan and brush becomes unnecessary, and even the finest particles of litter and dust are picked up by this apparatus, to which the conventional vacuum cleaner is attached while in storage position. The apparatus includes a sweepings pick-up nozzle device located in an aperture of the baseboard of the room or of a cabinet therein, the nozzle device having a foot operable door for closing it off when not in use and for opening the door and simultaneously actuating the stored vacuum cleaner connected thereto to pick up the sweepings, and when finished, closing the door, by the sweeper foot, also shuts oh the vacuum cleaner, yet the vacuum cleaner is available for its conventional use whenever desired. When the vacuum cleaner is stored, its hose is connected to a coupling to the nozzle device, and itsplug is connected to a circuit connected to the nozzle door, both 2 coupling and plug connections being located inthe storage area for easy operation.

With the above and related objects in view, this invention consists in the details of construction and combination of parts, as will be more fully understood from the following description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a kitchen cabinet in which the invention has been installed, in one form.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view on line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view on line 33 of FIG. 1 and of FIG. 6.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view on line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a front plan view, partly in elevation, on line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

vFIG. 6 is a fragmentary detail of the invention of FIGS. 1 to 5 as mounted on the end wall of a kitchen cabinet or extending through a closet wall.

.FIG. 7 is a sectional view on line 7-7 of FIG. 6. FIG. '8 is a sectional view through a rotary type of nozzle mounted in the kick space of a cabinet.

FIG. 9 is a top sectional view on line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary view of the micro switch on line 1til0 of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a sectional view of one form of push-in model in the kick space of the kitchen cabinet.

FIG. 12 is a view on line 1212 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a sectional view on line 13-13 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 14 is a sectional View of a modified form of pushin nozzle.

FIG. 15 is a sectional view on line 15-15 of FIG. 14.

There is shown at 10 one form of the vacuum cleaner floor sweepings pick-up baseboard apparatus of this invention as installed in a kitchen cabinet 12 in FIGS. 1 to 5 inclusive and as installed through the baseboard of a wall 14 of a closet or other storage area 16 as shown in FIGS. 3 and 5 to 7 inclusive. This apparatus includes a nozzle device shown at 18 provided with a face plate Zti to each end of which is secured by means of the stud screw 22 a flange 24 having a vertically extending slot 26 in a flange car 27' through which is passed. a wood screw 28 for adjustably securing the face plate 2:9, and thus the flange ears 27 are secured in countersunk recesses 30 of a baseboard 32, thus adjusting the position of the nozzle device 18 to the floor covering 34, so that the entrance lower lip 36 of the nozzle mouth 38 will be in the same plane, as shown in FIG. 4.

The stud screw 22 also extends into a nozzle ear 40 extending from the side edge of the nozzle mouth 38 to thus secure the nozzle 42 thereto, with the upper lip 44 in spaced relation behind the face plate 20, thus providing space for a nozzle door 46 to move up to open and down to close an aperture 48 in face plate 20 aligned with the entrance 50 to the nozzle 42. The face plate 20 has a vertical slot 52 through which extends a boss 54- secured at 56 to the door 46 and provided with a flange 58 on the outside of the face plate 20 and an annular spring 60 between the door 46 and the face plate 20 serves to yieldably retain the door 46 in either open or closed position. A toe engaging finger 62 is provided extending from the boss 54 for operation by the foot of the sweeper for raising or lowering the door 46 between open and closed positions without bending over or stoopmg.

The baseboard 32 may be recessed between the floor 63 of a kitchen and the floor of the cabinet 12 in the conventional kick space 64, as shown in FIG. 2, or it may be at the bottom of a room or closet wall 14 providing a storage area 16.

Extending from the nozzle 42, to which it is connected in a conventional manner by a clamping screw 68 is a pipe or hose 70 terminating in a female coupling 72 into which may be inserted the end of a vacuum cleaner hose 74. A pair of supporting hooks 76 are provided in the storage space 16, and the hose 74 of any conventional vacuum cleaner 78 is removably stored in the storage space 16 in the cabinet or closet. The electric cord 80 from the vacuum cleaner switch 82 has its plug 84 inserted in the electric receptacle 86 located conveniently beside the coupling 72. A cut-out switch 88 is provided in the receptacle 86, which is at a convenient height, as when there are children present who might play with the door 46 and its finger 62, thus avoiding the need for bending over to the vacuum cleaner switch 82 once the vacuum cleaner 78 has been placed in storage position.

From the receptacle 86 there extends an electric conduit 90 connected to a micro-switch 96 mounted in a bracket 94 on the nozzle device 18. Actuating means for the micro-switch 96 is provided by push button switch 98 mounted in the path of a spring arm 180 mounted on the bracket 94 and normally biased away therefrom and carrying a roller 182 normally in the path of the beveled top edge 104 of the door 46. Assuming that both the vacuum cleaner switch 82 and the cut-out switch 88 are in circuit completing position, lifting the toe finger 62 by the sweepers foot will lift the door 46 to open position, and simultaneously, through the door beveled edge 104, pushing the roller 182 back, cause the spring arm 100 to depress push button switch 98 and cause the microswitch 96 to complete the circuit from the receptacle 86 to the vacuum cleaner 78, and thus create a vacuum at the entrance 50 to the nozzle 42, and suck in any floor sweepings, dust, litter, etc. which has been swept to a position close to the face plate opening 48 on the floor covering 34, and pick up even the finest particles of dust or debris which normally are not picked up by a dust pan and broom. When the sweepings are all picked up, downward pressure on door finger 62 moves the door 46 to closed position, and spring arm 100 releases its pressure on push button 98 to intermpt the circuit to the vacuum cleaner 78. Obviously, the micro-switch 96 may be a conventional switch with the vacuum cleaner circuit coming thereto in series, or a micro-switch for controlling the circuit from the receptacle 86, as both systems are conventional.

The operation of this form of the invention is clear from the above description. When the sweeper or housekeeper wishes to use the vacuum cleaner 78 for its conventional cleaning purpose elsewhere in the house, she merely lifts the vacuum cleaner hose 74 out of the coupling 72 and unplugs the plug 84 from the receptacle 86, and then removes and uses the vacuum cleaner as desired. When finished, she again places the vacuum cleaner 78 in the storage space 16, inserts the plug 84 and the hose 74, and, if switches 88 and 82 are in the on" position, the system is ready for automatic operation at any time. If small children are in the room who may be tempted to play with the door 46, she merely operates the switch 88 to the 011 position and leaves it off while the children are present.

The principles of this invention may be used, even though the details of the nozzle device are changed, and some different types of nozzle devices are here illustrated. In FIGS. 8, 9, and 10, a rotary type of nozzle device 110 is shown. In FIGS. 11, 12 and 13, one type of a push-in nozzle device 112 is shown, and in FIGS. 14 and another type of push-in nozzle device 114 is shown. These alternate types 118, 112 and 114 are particularly intended for use in connection with recessed baseboards providing toe spaces, such as in cabinets.

The rotary nozzle device 110 is generally L-shaped, as shown in FIG. 8, and has a female hose coupling 116 mounted at the upper end of a somewhat vertical leg 118 of the nozzle device 110. This leg 118 is adjustably secured by ball joint 120 and a locking nut 122 through a ball bearing housing 124 extending through the floor 126 The ball joint 128 makes it possible to mount the leg 1 18 slightly oii center from the vertical, as shown by theangle center line 134 and the vertical line 136, the angle line 134 extending forwardly as shown. Rotatably mounb' ed on the vertical leg 118 by means of the ball bearings 138 is an L nozzle body 140 on the other end of which is mounted the nozzle 142, a toe pad 144 being mounted on the nozzle mouth 146 thereon at one end as shown, for pushing the nozzle device 118 in a rotary direction from the open position shown in full lines to the closed position shown in dash lines at 143. Due to the sllght inclination of the leg 118, as shown by angle line 134, the beveled nozzle entrance lip 148 rests on the fioor 130 in open position as shown in full lines in FIG. 8, and lifts above the floor to avoid scratching it, as shownnn dash lines at 143. A door 150 for the framed opening 152 in the recessed baseboard 154 of cabinet 128 15 mounted on the back of the nozzle L body 14 50 that when the nozzle 142 is rotated to closed position, th door 150 closes the framed opening 152. A toe pad .1 is provided at one end of door 150, and the door is likewise lifted when moving to the open position shown in full lines in FIG. 8, the closed position being shown at 151. A right angle flange 156 extends from one end of door 150 and cooperates with a push button switch 158 on a micro-switch 160 mounted at one end of the framed opening 152, both to limit the closing position of the door, and to automatically out 01f the power in the circuit to the vacuum cleaner when the door is closed. A magnet 162 cooperates with a magnetic member 163 on the door 150 to hold it in closed position, and pressure on the nozzle toe pad 144 closes the door until magnet 162 takes eifect to hold it closed. Foot pressure on door toe pad 155 opens the door and places the nozzle 142 in operative position, and simultaneously completes the eir= cuit to the vacuum cleaner.

A second toe pad 166 is provided on the nozzle 142 for use, if necessary, in pushing the nozzle toward closed po sition, While a coil spring 168 about the leg 1'18 biases the nozzle toward open position, once initial pressure on toe pad 155 on the door 150 has moved the door magnetic member 163 away from the magnet 162 fixed on the top of framed opening 152.

In the form of push-in nozzle device shown at 112 in FIGS. 11, 12 and 13, the nozzle device 114 includes a nozzle 170 generally T-shaped as shown, the T-stem leg 172 being provided with a female hose coupling 174 for receiving the vacuum cleaner hose 74 therein. The T- stem leg 172 is adjustably secured through a housing 176 by a set screw 178, the housing 176 being secured through an opening in the cabinet floor 180 by wood screws 181. The T-head leg 182 of nozzle device 112 is hollow and at a slight downward angle, and slidably receives a nozzle tube 184 therein, a nozzle month 186 being mounted thereon. A coil spring 188 about nozzle tube 184 between the T-head leg 182 and the nozzle mouth 186 biases the nozzle mouth 186 forwardly and downwardly from the inoperative or closed position shown in dash lines to the open position shown in full lines, with a tube side opening 187 mating with the end of hollow leg 172, the other end of the nozzle tube 184 being closed by a flanged cap 189, there being a cushion band 191 between cap 189 and the T-head leg 182. The cap 189 serves to limit the forward movement of the tube mouth 186 to the position shown with a lower entrance beveled lip 190 just making contact with the room floor covering 192 as shown in FIG. 11. Rotation of the tube 184 within the hollow T-head leg 182 is prevented by cooperating keyways 1% and ball bearings 195 on the tube 184 and T-- head leg 182.

The nozzle mouth 186 pushes forward to operative open position through a framed opening 196 in the recessed baseboard 198 in the kick space 200 beneath the cabinet 202 having the storage space 204. Hinged to the -framed opening .196 at .205 is a door 206 having a toe pad 208 extending beyond the front of the cabinet 202 when in open position, as shown in FIG. '11. A link 210 pivoted at one end at 212 to an ear 214 on door 208 and pivoted at its other end 216 to one latch part 218 of a touch-latch, such as described in US. Patent 'No. 2,637,- 576, the other latch part 220 being mounted on the T- stem leg 172.

A bracket 222 mounted on the T-head leg 182 supports the micro-switch 224 from which extends the circuit conduit 226, the micro-switch push button switch 228 being located in the path of a flange 230 extending from the nozzle tube cap 189, so that when the nozzle mouth 186 is in forward position with the door 210 in open position, the circuit through conduit to the vacuum is completed, while when in the dash outlined retracted and closed position, the circuit is interrupted. To close the door 208 and cut off the operation of the vacuum cleaner, the toe pad 208 is stepped on downwardly, closing the door about its hinge, pushing the nozzle mouth back against the bias of coil spring 188 until the touch latch parts 218 and 220 cooperate to hold the door closed. To open the door and operate the vacuum cleaner, the toe pad 208 is kicked slightly, causing the touch latch 218 and 220 to release and the door opens, the nozzle moves forward to operating position, and the circuit is completed to the vacuum cleaner stored in the storage space 204.

The other form of push in nozzle device shown at 114 in FIGS. 14 and 15 is similar to the one shown at 11 except for certain details, and where the details are identical, the same reference numbers are used, and the foregoing description applies thereto. In this case, the nozzle month 186 is mounted on a nozzle tube 244 which has an opening at 242 mating with the opening at the bottom of nozzle device leg 172 when in operative or open position. It is biased to operative position by a spring 244 located between the end of the nozzle tube 240 and an abutment 246 at the end of the leg 243 extending from vertical leg 172 in FIGS. 14 and 15. A bolt and nut 254) and 251 limits the forward movement of the tube nozzle tube 248 and its nozzle mouth 186. The micro-switch 252 has a push button 254 for interrupting the circuit when it is pushed in by a flange 256 mounted on nozzle tube 240. The leg 248 is at a slight angle, so that nozzle mouth lower entrance lip 198 contacts the floor covering 192, just as in the other form, to prevent sweepings from passing thereunder and escaping the suction.

The operation of all forms of this invention by the sweeper is the same, the door is opened by the foot of the sweeper, simultaneously activating the vacuum cleaner, and is closed in the same manner to deactivate the vacuum cleaner, and the vacuum cleaner may be removed, at any time, when desired, for conventional use. The storage space for the vacuum cleaner may be in a cabinet, in a closet, or in a space more remote from the room being swept, by merely making the circuit conduit and the connecting hose for receiving the vacuum cleaner hose of appropriate length.

While the device has been shown and the structure described in detail, it is obvious that this invention is not to be considered as being limited to the exact form disclosed, and that changes in detail and construction may be made therein Within the scope of what is claimed, without departing from the spirit of this invention.

Having thus set forth and disclosed the nature of this invention, what is claimed is:

1. A vacuum cleaner floor sweepings pick up baseboard apparatus comprising a sweepings pick-up nozzle device, said nozzle device including an elongated nozzle mouth member having a long lower lip portion mounted to have the suction thereof extend through a baseboard aperture commencing at and extending upwardly from the level of the floor the sweepings from which are to be picked up, a vacuum cleaner, a vacuum hose for connecting the vacuum cleaner to said nozzle device, a circuit receptacle for receiving the electric plug of the vacuum cleaner, a vacuum cleaner circuit completing and interrupting means operatively associated with said nozzle device, and nozzle device operating means for activating or deactivating said nozzle device and said vacuum cleaner circuit completing and interrupting means, whereby when the hose of the vacuum cleaner is connected to said nozzle device and the vacuum cleaner electric plug is connected to the circuit receptacle, and the vacuum cleaner switch is in its on position, operation of said nozzle device operating means will activate the vacuum cleaner and said nozzle device to sweepings pick up condition or deactivate both said nozzle device and the vacuum cleaner to inactive condition, the vacuum cleaner being a stored portable type vacuum cleaner normally used independently, but temporarily connected to said vacuum hose and thereby to said nozzle device.

2. A vacuum cleaner floor sweepings pick up baseboard apparatus comprising a sweepings pick-up nozzle device, said nozzle device including an elongated nozzle mouth having a long lower lip portion mounted to have the suction thereof extend through a baseboard aperture commencing at and extending upwardly from the level of the floor the sweepings from which are to be picked up, a vacuum cleaner hose for connecting a vacuum cleaner to said nozzle device, a circuit receptacle for receiving the electric plug of the vacuum cleaner, a vacuum cleaner circuit completing and interrupting means operatively associated with said nozzle device, and nozzle device operating means for activating or deactivating said nozzle device and said vacuum cleaner circuit completing and interrupting means, whereby when the hose of the vacuum cleaner is connected to said nozzle device and the vacuum cleaner electric plug is connected to the circuit receptacle, and the vacuum cleaner switch is in its on position, operation of said nozzle device operating means will activate the vacuum cleaner and said nozzle device to sweepings pick up condition or deactivate both said nozzle device and the vacuum cleaner to inactive condition, said nozzle device operating means comprising a door associated with said nozzle device and located between said nozzle device and the floor when said nozzle device is in deactivated position, said circuit completing means being activated and deactivated by movement of said door between open and closed positions, respectively.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, and foot cooperating means on said door.

4. The apparatus of claim 2, said door being mounted on said nozzle device for movement between open and closed positions, said circuit completing means being mounted on said nozzle device and having an actuating means mounted for actuation by movement of said door for completing the circuit while said door is open and interrupting the circuit while the door is closed.

5. The apparatus of claim 2, said door being mounted on said nozzle device for vertical movement in the front thereof between open and closed positions, said circuit completing means being mounted on said nozzle device and having an actuating means mounted in the vertical path of movement of said door for completing the circuit while said door is open and interrupting the circuit while the door is closed.

6. The apparatus of claim 2, said door being mounted on said nozzle device for rotary movement between open and closed positions, said circuit completing means being mounted in the rotary path of movement of said door for completing the circuit while the door is open and interrupting the circuit while the door is closed.

7. The apparatus of claim 2, said door being hingedly mounted on said nozzle device for swinging movement between open and closed position, said nozzle device being reciprocally mounted for movement between active and inactive positions, and link means connecting said door and said nozzle device for simultaneous actuation, said circuit completing means being mounted on said nozzle device in the path of an actuating member mounted on said reciprocating nozzle device.

8. The apparatus of claim 7, and means biasing said nozzle device forwardly and downwardly to active position and simultaneously through said link means, swinging said door to open position, and touch latch means for releasably holding said nozzle device in inactive position and said door in closed position.

9. The apparatus of claim 8, said nozzle device including a T-tube connected to said hose and having its T-head mounted at a slight angle to the horizontal, said nozzle device comprising a nozzle sleeve telescoped within said T-head and having an entrance complementary to said hollow T-stem when in forward position, said nozzle mouth being on the end of said nozzle sleeve.

10. The apparatus of claim 9, said biasing means comprising a coil expansion spring about said nozzle sleeve between said nozzle mouth and said T-stem.

11. The apparatus of claim 9, said biasing means comprising a coil expansion spring in interposed position within said T-head between the end of said nozzle sleeve within said T-head and am abutment on the opposite end of said T-head.

12. The apparatus of claim 11, and a stop lirnit rod secured to the end of said nozzle sleeve and extending through said abutment.

13. The apparatus of claim 6, said nozzle device comprising an L-shaped tube, said nozzle mouth being secured at the end of one leg of said L-shaped tube, said hose being connected to the other leg of said L-shaped tube, and means for rotatably mounting said other leg at a slight angle from the vertical toward the open door position of said nozzle device, whereby said nozzle mouth descends as it rotates to open door position, and ascends as it rotates to closed door position, said closed door position being determined by collision between said door and said circuit interrupting and completing means.

14. The apparatus of claim 5, said nozzle device comprising said nozzle mouth, a face plate adjustably secured to said nozzle mouth and spaced forwardly therefrom, said face plate having an aperture complementary to the nozzle mouth aperture, and means for slidably mounting said door between said face plate and said nozzle mouth for vertical movement between open and closed positions.

15. The apparatus of claim 14, said nozzle mouth being secured in a stationary position.

16. The apparatus of claim 14, said mounting means comprising a vertical slot in said face plate, a boss secured on said door and guided in said vertical slot, a flange on said boss extending beyond said slot, and biasing means between said face plate and door holding said door in any position.

17. The apparatus of claim 16, and a toe cooperating finger extending from said boss in said slot.

18. The apparatus of claim 2, a storage area for the vacuum cleaner located behind the baseboard, and means in said storage area for detachably supporting the vacuum cleaner hose in a smooth curve between the vacuum cleaner stored therein and said nozzle device, said electric plug receiving receptacle being located in said storage area.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,618,667 Melcher Feb. 22, 1 927 1,681,624 Replogle Aug. 21, 1928 1,717,471 Spencer June 18, 1929 2,023,955 Harvey Dec. 10, 1935 2,128,207 Hodge Aug. 23, 1938 2,675,273 Sanders Apr. 13, 1954 2,810,028 Hopper Oct. 15, 1957

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Referenced by
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US3146483 *Sep 5, 1962Sep 1, 1964Harold P BishopTool actuated quick acting slide valve
US4551879 *Oct 15, 1984Nov 12, 1985Isaac RayEntrance dust arrester
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US5408721 *Dec 27, 1993Apr 25, 1995Wall; James C.Automatic dustpan member for central vacuum cleaning system
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US6108858 *Jun 4, 1998Aug 29, 2000Canplas Industries Ltd.Waste receptacle for a vacuum cleaning system
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US8938849 *Nov 9, 2011Jan 27, 2015Kit-Vac International Pty LtdVacuum assembly
US9237832Feb 7, 2013Jan 19, 2016Ivd Global CorporationIlluminated inlet for vacuum cleaning apparatus
US9254070May 31, 2012Feb 9, 2016Ivd Global CorporationInlet for vacuum cleaning apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/301, 15/414, 15/328, 15/312.1
International ClassificationA47L5/38, A47L5/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/38
European ClassificationA47L5/38