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Publication numberUS3027870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1962
Filing dateJul 5, 1957
Priority dateJul 5, 1957
Publication numberUS 3027870 A, US 3027870A, US-A-3027870, US3027870 A, US3027870A
InventorsHenry G Schirmer
Original AssigneePersonal Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray apparatus
US 3027870 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 3, 1962 H. G. SCHIRMER SPRAY APPARATUS Filed July 5, 195'? a INVENTOR ,li/wer 6-. .fa/MWER ATT R N EY l Henry G. Schirmer,

tern sprayed.

United States Patent 3,927,870 SPRAY APPARATUS Flushing, N.Y., assignor to Personal Products Corporation, a corporation of New Jersey Filed July 5, 1957, Ser. No. 679,988 12 Qlairns. ((31. 1l8--504) This invention relates to spray devices and more particularly to devices for controlling and confining the spray and the spray patterns of spraying apparatus, such as spray guns.

in a typical spraying operation, the liquid to be sprayed is forced through a jet or nozzle under pressure which breaks it down into finely divided particles so that it emerges from the nozzle in a mist-like form. Because it is in a finely divided state, and under pressure, not all of the liquid emerging from the nozzle is deposited on the surface to be sprayed. Some of its bounces back from the surface and escapes into the surrounding atmosphere. Another part drifts off and is deposited on other surfaces adjacent the surface being sprayed where it collects. In many instances, these incidents of spraying are undesirable because a variety of spraying operations require controlled application of the sprayed liquid to the surface sprayed. In some cases, it may be necessary to apply the sprayed liquid over the surface uniformly; in others, to apply the sprayed liquid to the surface in a partcular pattern as, for example a line or broad .band with sharply defined edges; and in still others, the spraying operation may require rapid removal of any excess sprayed liquid to avoid dripping and spattering.

In attempts to overcome these problems, hoods and similar devices have beenused to confine and control the spray particularly when the spraying is being performed in closed areas. Although the uSe of hoods has aidedin overcoming some of the problems, others remain. For example, the hoods themselves have surfaces upon which some of the sprayed liquid may deposit, collect and then drip off. This is particularly troublesome when the surface being sprayed is positioned below the spray nozzle; e.g., Where the spraying operation involves spraying a horizontal surface. The liquid which has collectedon the hood surfaces may fall upon the surface being sprayed. When the spraying operation involves the use of a mask or stencil to define a sprayed pattern of particular form, or the operation involves the applicationof the liquid .sprayed in controlled amounts, it is apparent that such dripping must be avoided.

' effectively removed :before it accumulates in such quantities as will result in its dripping on the surface sprayed. A partcularly suitabledevice of this nature would provide for rapid removal of this part of the spray.

It is an object of this invention to provide a device for confining and collecting surplus sprayed liquid resulting from spraying operations. It is another object of this invention to provide a hood which can be used in spraying operations to confine the sprayed liquid. It isstill another object of this inventionto provide a device which also canbe used as a mask or stencil for defining thepat- It is a still further object of this invention to provide a device .which canbe employed in spraying operations involving spraying horizontal surfaces to preventdripping of the sprayed liquid on suchsur-faces.

' Other 'andfurther objects of-the invention will become .apparentt'froma consideration of the attaehed;; drawing 3,927,870 Patented Apr. 3, l92

and the following specification wherein a preferred embodiment is illustrated and described.

In the drawings:

FIG. I is a perspective view of devices incorporating the invention used with a conventionalspray nozzle;

FIG. 2 is a view of the interior of the device illustrated in FIG. 1, along line 2- 2;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of FIG. 1 taken along line 33;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partly in section, of FIG. 3 showing certain parts thereof in greater detail; and

KG. 5 is a diagrammatic view in elevation of the device in use in a continuous spraying operation.

Referring to the drawings wherein like characters denote similar parts throughout the several views, there is shown a spray nozzle 1 of conventional form through which the liquid to be sprayed is forced under air pressure positioned within a hollow casing or hood 2. The hood may be attached to the'nozzle, if desired, to provide a mobile unit.

In the embodiment illustrated, the hood is in the shape of a hollow, inverted, truncated pyramid having four Walls 3 converging downwardly towards each other and meeting to define a rectangular opening 4 through which a liquid 5 from the spray nozzle is discharged on to the surface being sprayed. The hood may be of a variety'of forms, as, for example, an oval, a truncated cone, or a polyhedron of other configuration. i

A the liquids is discharged from the spray nozzle in the form of finely divided particles, it passes through the opening 4- at the bottom of the hood defined by the lower peripheral edges of the converging walls 3 and is deposited upon the surface below to be sprayed. Because it is in a finely divided state, and under pressure, not all of the liquid ejected from the spray nozzle is deposited on the surface being sprayed. Some of it escapes into the surrounding atmosphere; another part bounces back from the surface'being sprayed and collects upon the hood, nozzle and other adjacent surfaces of the apparatus. Some of the sprayed liquid collects on the inner surfaces of walls 3 and then rolls downwardly towards the bottom edges of the walls towards the opening 4. When sulficient amounts of the sprayed liquid have collected on these surfaces, it will drip onto the surfaces being sprayed below.

This problem is accentuated when the hood is also being used as a mask or stencil to define the pattern to be sprayed, as for example in connection with apparatus similar to that illustrated in FIG. 5. When the hood is being used in this manner, it is necessary that the spray 5 discharged from the nozzle be larger than the opening 4 in the hood so that spray will fill the opening as it passes through. Consequently, the edges of spray will strike directly upon the inner surfaces of the walls 3 of the hood and a considerable amount of the liquid' will collect rapidly on the walls. It is apparent that this liquid'm'ust be removed quickly and effectively In accordance with the invention, sprayed liquid which collects on the walls of the hood and other a'djacentfsurfaces and which rolls down to the bottom edges of the hood is collected by providing porous hollow members 6, such as a perforated tube, on the bottom edgesof'the hood walls into which the liquid may be drawn'by suction. The invention also contemplates the use of a 'wicking member 7, as will be more fully'explained below, positioned on the bottom parts of the apparatus to hold liquid and to conduct it to openings 8 in the hollow member by capillarity where it is drawn into the interior of 'the'hollow member by the, suction.

Asillustrated in the drawing, these structural arrangements and the advantagesfollowing therefrom may be obtained by attaching a porous, hollow member, such as a tube, to the bottom edges of the hood walls at the opening 4 through which the sprayed liquid is discharged. If the opening is rectangular shaped, as illustrated, or of similar form, each side may be provided with a separate tube and all tubes connected to each other to form a continuous passageway around the opening. If the opening is circular or oval or of a similar form, one continuous tube of like shape may be used. The tubes 6 are connected to return tubes 9 which conduct the collected liquid to a master return tube 10 for return to the system for reuse, or to storage, or to waste, as desired.

The openings 8 in the tubes 6 are preferably on the surface of the tubes facing towards the interior of the hood so that the liquid rolling down the inner surface of the hood walls will be quickly drawn through the openings into the tube by the suction. These openings may be a series of ports extending the length of the tubes, a thin, longitudinal slot or of other suitable forms. The hollow member may be a porous ceramic tile or of similar material. The openings in the tube should be sufficiently large to permit the liquid to enter the tube readily, but not so large that it would be diificult or uneconomical to maintain adequate suction to draw the liquid into the interior of the tubes.

As the sprayed liquid is ejected from the spray nozzle, some of it deposits on the inner surface of the walls of the hood. When sufiicient amounts of it have collected, it rolls downwardly towards the lower edges of the hood. When the rolling liquid contacts the openings 8 in the tubes 6, it is drawn into the interior thereof by the suction into the return tubes 9.

Some of the sprayed liquid, including pan of that which bounces back from the surface being sprayed and that which has escaped into the surrounding atomsphere, collects on the bottom edges 11 of the tube. This liquid will not be drawn into the tubes by the applied suction if it does not contact the tube openings. Consequently, it will collect and drip from the tubes. This is also true of liquid which collects on the outer surfaces of the tubes and adjacent surfaces of the hood walls. In accordance with the invention, the liquid which collects on these surfaces can be drawn into the tubes by the suction by employing an element which acts as a wick to pick up this liquid and conduct it to the tube openings.

As illustrated in FIG. 4 of the drawings, wicking element may extend from adjacent the lower inner edges of the hood walls 3 downwardly over the openings 8 in the tubes 6, around the bottom of the tube and then upwardly a short distance along the outer surfaces of the walls. It is not necessary, however, that the wicking element cover the openings in the tubes; it may extend to the edges of the openings or in such proximity to the openings to bring liquid held by it under the influence of the suction to enable the suction to draw the liquid through the openings into the tubes. The wicking material may be applied to the wall and tube surfaces by means of an adhesive, hooking devices, snaps, pins, or in any other suitable manner. Any suitable material which provides the wicking-like action may be used. A number of plies of woven textile fabric such as gauze or a nonwoven fabric are suitable because they may be quickly replaced, if necessary. Liquid which contacts the wicking element will be retained by the element by virtue of its capillary properties and will be conducted to the openings in the tubes under the influence of the applied suction.

In FIG. 5, the device is shown in use in connection with an operation involving spraying the surface of a horizontally moving web. A web 12 of fibers is fed from a feed roll 13 to an endless supporting belt 14 under the spray nozzle 1 and then to a driven take-up roll 15. The hood 2 is placed above the web a sufiicient height to permit the web to move freely below The spray nozzle is directed downwardly towards the upper surface of the web and is positioned inside the hood so that the spray will be confined within the hood as it passes through to the web below. Liquid sprayed from the nozzle is discharged through the opening in the bottom of the hood and is deposited upon the upper surface of the web moving below.

In the illustration, the hood is also used as a mask. The opening in the bottom of the hood is positioned over the center of the web so that the pattern which is sprayed upon the web will be limited to the center portion and so that the edges of the web will be unsprayed. To insure that the sprayed liquid is deposited on the web evenly and in uniform concentrations, it is necessary for the spray to pass through the opening in the hood in regular and in uniform concentrations. To this end, the'spray pattern from the spray nozzle and the position of the nozzle in the hood is regulated so that edges 16 of the spray strike the inner surface of the converging walls of the hood. Consequently, a large amount of the sprayed liquid accumulates rapidly upon these surfaces and rolls downwardlly towards the bottom edges of the hood. When the sprayed liquid contacts the wicking element, it is picked up by the element, as best seen in FIG. 4, and directed to the openings in the tubing positioned around the hood opening. It is drawn into the interior of tubes 6 by the suction and then passes from the tubes to the collecting tubes 9 communicating therewith. The pattern sprayed upon the surface of the moving web is in the form of a continuous band.

In the example, water is lightly sprayed in the form of a fine mist upon a web under two pounds of pressure through a hood having an opening one and three-eighth inches square. The sprayed area is a continuous band one and three-eighth inches wide. Copper tubes, one and three-eighth inches long having an outside diameter of one-quarter inch and an inside diameter of threesixteenth inch is attached to each side of the hood opening. Each tube has eight aligned holes, one-eighth inch in diameter, equally placed throughout its length. The tubes are positioned so that the line of holes face towards the center of the hood opening. Each tube is covered with a wicking element consisting of absorbent cotton fabric sheeting. The amount of suction applied to draw the excess sprayed liquid into the tubes is ad justed as required.

The device may be used in spraying operations which are intermittent instead of continuous. For example, the Web of material to be sprayed may be moving intermittently and the surface of the web directly below the spray nozzle and the hood sprayed each time the web is halted in its movement. In this manner there may be provided on the web patterns of different configurations in a repeating fashion depending upon the configuration of the opening in the hood.

The hood may be attached to the spraying apparatus, or to a mobile spray gun, so that the entire assembly may be moved freely; or it may be attached to other parts of the equipment with which it is used.

It is to be appreciated that the invention is not limited to the specific forms illustrated and described above and that changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hollow casing having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said casing onto an object positioned beyond said opening, the walls of said casing adjacent said opening converging thereon, said opening defining the spray pattern discharged, capillary means at the said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, and means for removing collected sprayed liquid from said capillary means.

2. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hollow casing having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said casing onto an object positioned beyond said opening, the walls of said casing adjacent said opening converging thereon, said opening defining the spray pattern discharged, and means at said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, said means having capillary openings in the direction of said casing opening through which said sprayed liquid may be drawn by suction.

3. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, means at said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, and means for conducting said excess liquid to said collecting means by capillarity and under suction applied to said collecting means.

4. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, the walls of said hood adjacent said opening converging thereon, said opening defining the spray pattern discharged, means at said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, and means for conducting said excess liquid to said collecting means by capillarity and under suction applied to said collecting means.

5. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, porous, hollow members attached to said hood at the edge of said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, and means for conducting said excess liquid to said hollow members by capillarity and under suction applied to said members.

6. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, hollow members attached to said hood at the edge of said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, said members having openings into the interior thereof, and a wicking element covering said openings and adjacent surfaces of said members and said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said openings by capillarity and under suction applied to said members.

7. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, hollow members attached to said hood at said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, said members having openings into the interior thereof, and a wicking element adjacent said openings and on adjacent surfaces of said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said openings by capillarity and under suction applied to said members.

8. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having converging walls which meet to define an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, tubes attached to said hood at the edge of said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, said tubes having openings into the interior thereof, and a wicking element covering said openings and adjaeent surfaces of said tubes and said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said tube openings by capillarity and under suction applied to said tubes.

9. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having converging walls which meet to define an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, tubes attached to said walls at the edge of said opening for collecting excess sprayed material, said tubes having ports throughout their length into the interior thereof, and an absorbent wicking element covering said ports and adjacent surfaces of said tubes and said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said tube ports by capillarity and under suction applied to said tubes.

10. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having an opening through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, said opening defining the spray pattern discharged, means at said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, and an absorbent fabric on said means and adjacent surfaces of said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said collecting means by capillarity and under suction applied to said collecting means.

11. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having a generally pyramidal shaped chamber with an opening at the apex through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, tubes attached to said hood at the edge of said opening for collecting excess sprayed liquid, said tubes having openings into the interior thereof, and a wicking element covering said openings and adjacent surfaces of said tubes and said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said tube openings by capillarity and under suction applied to said tubes.

12. For use with a spray nozzle, a device comprising a hood having a generally pyramidal shaped chamber with an opening at the apex through which the spray from the spray nozzle is discharged from within said hood onto an object positioned beyond said opening, hollow members at the edge of said opening, said members having openings into the interior thereof, and an absorbent fabric covering said openings and adjacent surfaces of said members and said hood for conducting said excess liquid to said openings, by capillarity and under suction applied to said members.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,066,201 Tulper July 1, 1913 1,368,426 Foote Feb. 15, 1921 1,985,482 Chapin et a1 Dec. 25, 1934 2,035,677 Steinke Mar. 31, 1936 2,152,274 Papazian Mar. 28, 1939 2,250,177 Boccasile July 22, 1941 2,488,195 Ivey Nov. 15, 1949 2,512,542 Goda June 20, 1950 2,514,748 Di Stefans July 11, 1950 2,730,033 Mellor Jan. 10, 1956 2,875,680 Forshee Mar. 3, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1066201 *Aug 25, 1911Jul 1, 1913John W FulperVacuum-mop.
US1368426 *Jun 2, 1917Feb 15, 1921THE MARBLE a SHATTUCX CHAIR COMPANYApparatus for recovering shellac and the like
US1985482 *Jun 13, 1931Dec 25, 1934United Shoe Machinery CorpMachine for applying cement
US2035677 *Mar 18, 1932Mar 31, 1936Francis J L DorlSpraying device
US2152274 *Aug 26, 1936Mar 28, 1939Papazian Martin SStencil attachment for spray guns
US2250177 *Nov 2, 1938Jul 22, 1941Boccasile NicholasFloor washing machine
US2488195 *Oct 25, 1946Nov 15, 1949John Ettensohn JrPaint spraying device
US2512542 *Nov 6, 1947Jun 20, 1950Lawrence B GodaSpraying mechanism
US2514748 *Feb 5, 1946Jul 11, 1950Di Stefano AlbertWaste spray collector
US2730033 *Feb 2, 1953Jan 10, 1956United Shoe Machinery CorpSpray booths
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3146083 *Apr 2, 1959Aug 25, 1964Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoMarking of glass sheets
US3377183 *Jul 1, 1963Apr 9, 1968Gen ElectricElectrostatic powder coating on heated parts
US3716024 *Oct 27, 1970Feb 13, 1973Carrier SaA device for spraying an electrified powdered material onto a structure
US4844345 *Apr 26, 1988Jul 4, 1989Waldrum John EAspirator tray
US5196065 *Oct 21, 1991Mar 23, 1993Jozwiak William JGarden spray shield apparatus
US6167935Sep 14, 1998Jan 2, 2001James E. HeiderLabeling machine
US6235345Apr 29, 1999May 22, 2001Gerro Plast GmbhApplying adhesives to labels with spraying and heating
US6471802Oct 21, 1999Oct 29, 2002Gerro Plast GmbhLabeling apparatus and method
WO2013003185A1 *Jun 21, 2012Jan 3, 2013Kellogg Brown & Root LlcLock hopper mass flow arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/504, 15/302, 118/301
International ClassificationB05B15/04
Cooperative ClassificationB05B15/0425, B05B15/0443, B05B15/0406
European ClassificationB05B15/04A6, B05B15/04E, B05B15/04A