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Publication numberUS3027999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1962
Filing dateJul 12, 1960
Priority dateJul 12, 1960
Publication numberUS 3027999 A, US 3027999A, US-A-3027999, US3027999 A, US3027999A
InventorsJr James H Heroy
Original AssigneePittsburgh Plate Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Unit package for painting
US 3027999 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 3, 1962 Filed July 12, 1960 FIGJ J. H. HEROY, JR

UNIT PACKAGE FOR PAINTING 2 Sheets-Sheet l larva/km Jnms M-HEQOY Je' Arron/{Y April 3, 1962 J. H. HEROY, JR

UNIT PACKAGE FOR PAINTING 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 12, 1960 FIG.5

FIG.4

INVENTOR. 9144155 A. HmoYJ e ATTOE/VEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,927,9953 Patented Apr. 3, 1962 3,027,999 UNIT PACKAGE FOR PAINTING James H. Heroy, Jr., Sewickley, Pa, assignor to Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed July 12, 1960, Ser. No. 42,296 Claims. (Cl. 206-47) This invention relates to unit packages for painting comprising an applicator and a flexible plastic wrapping therefor. The invention has particular relation to packages in which the plastic wrapping is formed to have the characteristics of an over-sized, loosely fitting, glove-like member and is adapted for a great variety of uses in painting operations after its initial use as a merchandising wrapper for the applicator.

In the merchandising of paint applicators, such as rollers and brushes, it has often been customary to mount the applicators upon cards or to enclose them in sheetlike or sleeve-like wrappings of heavy paper or plastic materials. Such wrappings were designed to protect the bristle portions of the brushes or the rolls of the roller applicators from soiling and damage during storage, and were useful only during a period of storage and could not be used during the active service of the applicator. They were also relatively expensive to obtain and to apply to the applicator body to be protected Since in many painting operations solvents and, other materials harsh to the skin of the user are employed, it was often desirable in painting operations to wear a protective glove, such as a rubber glove, in order to prevent contact with the offending constituent.

This invention comprises the provision of a unit package for painting comprising as one element, an applicator for the paints and as a second element, a wrapping therefor which has the form of an over-sized, loosely fitting glove formed of sheet plastic, which is at once soft and flexible and has at least a reasonable degree of resistance to paint solvents, cleaners, paint removers, and other chemicals that may be used in painting operations. Such wrapping is at once inexpensive and after its initial use as a wrapping for protecting the brush or applicator during merchandising, is remarkably versatile for various purposes in painting operations. Some of the uses to which such a wrapping may be applied will be described in greater detail in a subsequent portion of this specification.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may now be had to the accompanying drawings, in which like numerals refer to like parts and in which:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of a unit of a paint applicator and a wrapping adapted to provide a unit package.

FIGURE 2 is a plan view showing the wrap-per of FIGURE 1 folded about the applicator in order to conserve space.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view showing the use of the wrapper as disclosed in FIGURES l and 2 for cleaning a paint applicator.

FIGURE 4 is a view showing the slipping of the wrapping as disclosed in FIGURES l and 2 which has been used as a glove, over a soiled paint applicator to provide a covering therefor.

FIGURE 5 is a view showing the use of the wrapper element as disclosed in FIGURES 1 and 2, for covering the mouth of a paint container and an applicator disposed therein, after a painting operation.

FIGURE 6 is an elevational view showing a further mode of wrapping a brush.

In FIGURES 1 and 2 is disclosed a package comprising a conventional paint applicator 10, which in th embodiment shown, is a brush having a bristle portion 11,

a ferrule 12 and a handle 13 which may be provided with a hole 14, by means of which it may be hung upon a nail or peg when not in use. It will be apparent that if desired, the brush may be replaced by a paint roller.

The applicator, e.g., the brush shown in FIGURE 1, is made up into a unit package for pain-ting by means of a covering 15, which as shown has the form of an oversized glove adapted to fit very loosely upon the hand of the user.

In choosing a proper size of glove-like covering, it will be recognized that there is considerable variation in the size of the hands of individuals. Also, the width of brushes or rollers to be packaged therewith is variable. Probably, most hands will be in a range of 2% to 3% inches in width at the palm. To provide the desired loose fit of the wrappings when they are to be used as gloves, it is considered that the width of the metacarpus covering portion should be in a range of 3 /2 to about 7 inches. The smaller size would be suitable for use on small hands, while the larger sizes would be better adapted for large hands.

The wrapping 15 includes a metacarpus covering portion 16 and digit covering portions, including fingers 17 and a thumb 18. Preferably, the upper portion of the wrapping is substantially extended, as at 19, above the line XX, which approximately marks the upper extremity of the bristle portion 11 when the handle portion 13 of the brush is inserted in any one of the finger portions 17. It will be observed that the handle is shownas being inserted in the middle finger portion of the glove-like covering 15, thus providing a relatively symmetrical arrangement, but obviously, the handle may be inserted in any of the other digit covering portions of the glove-like wrapping.

If desired, the side portions Y and Z, including two digit covering portions, may be folded over upon the brush in the manner shown in FIGURE 2 in order to provide a compact package. Also, the top portion of the package designed to cover the wrist of the user, may be doubled down around line XX upon the bristle portion of the brush. The folded portions 19 of the wrapping may be held in place by suitable means, as for example, a string or an elastic band, such as a rubber band indicated at 20, and being adapted to snap over the wrapping to hold the same in place.

Means to hang the glove-like covering element upon a nail or hook may be provided. Such means is illustrated as comprising a tab 21, integral with or bonded to a portion such as the tip of the middle or other finger of the covering. The tab may b a strip of plastic which is the same as the covering 15, and may be a mere extension on one or both sides thereof. It may also be a tab adhered as by heat to the covering. It is perforated as at 22 to permit hanging of the unit package in the manner described. The tip of the finger portion is sealed to prevent entrance of paint or other materials.

The glove-like wrapping preferably is formed of a plastic material, which usually is a relatively transparent sheet permitting visual inspection of the contents, and for reasons of economy, it is also comparatively thin. The plastic preferably is quite flexible and is also resistant to the various agencies such as toxic pigments, solvents, diluents, cleaners, paint removers, and other agencies which the operator may be required to employ in painting operations. For this purpose, it is considered that polyethylene is well adapted, although it is by no means the only possible plastic which may be used. Polyethylene i s flexible, sufficiently transparent and is quite resistant to most of the agencies which are employed in paints and in the use thereof, but which are objectionable when in contact with the skin of the operator. The polyethylene is also quite inexpensive. both with respect to raw materials employed in the preparation thereof and in the manufacture thereof into glove-like wrapping elements. Polyethylene may be replaced by polystyrene, plasticized polyvinyl chloride, nylon, and other plastics.

The glove-like wrapping as disclosed in FIGURES 1 and 2 successfully protects the paint applicators from soiling or other damage during storage, so that the packages upon the shelves of the dealer or during any other reasonable period of storage to which the packages may be subjected, are kept perfectly clean and fresh, and also, bristles or other materials which possibly are subject to oxidational damage from the atmosphere are very well protected.

After the packages have reached the hands of the consumer, the wrappings should be removed with reasonable care in order not to tear or otherwise to damage them. In event that the wrappings are held in place by rubber band 20, this is very easily accomplished merely by removing the band and unfolding the wrapping. The applicator, such as the brush 10, can then be removed and the wrapping, which then constitutes an over-sized glove, can be applied to the hand of the user. If desired, the rubber band 20 removed from the wrapping, or any other elastic band, may be shoved up over the hand and snapped about the wrist to hold the upper portion snugly in place upon the Wrist.

The glove thus provided from the wrapping is quite as serviceable as any conventional plastic glove. The flexibility, thinness and the looseness of fit thereof provide a minimum of interference in the movements of the hand and the'tactile senses in the painting operation. The glove provided by the wrapping is completely serviceable for such'operations as applying paint cleaners and paint removers, since any used in such operations will not touch the skin of the operator.

When painting operations are completed, or in event that for any reason, it isdesirable to interrupt operations, the glove provided by the wrapping may be used in storing or cleaning the soiled brush. It may, for example, be merely worn in conventional manner as a glove to hold and manipulate the brush in the solvent during washing operations. However, it is considered that a good mode of operation in cleaning is often merely to remove the glove-like covering from the hand of the user, transferring the same to cover the bristle portion of the brush. Such transferral is approximately illustrated in FIG- URE 4 of the drawings. In the operation, the bristle portion 11 of the brush is grasped between the thumb' and fingers, fingertips pointing approximately upwardly, the tip of the brush downward in the gloved hand of the user. In this operation, the glove-like member protects the hand from soiling by the paint on the brush. The rubber band (assuming one is used) upon the wrist of the user, is slipped from the top of the glove and the wrist portion is stripped over the hand and upon the handle of the brush, thus turning the palm and wrist portions of the glove-like member inside out, whereby to contain ahe bristle'portion in the metacarpus covering portion of the glove, The fingens are then slipped from the digit covering portions. Usually, the fingers and thumb of the glove-like member are partly turned inside out bythe stripping operation. Parts thereof remain extending up into the palm of the glove, as illustrated in FIGURE 3, and this has advantages as less solvent is required to immerse the bristle portion, in event one is introduced into the member for cleaning or other purposes. The member may then conveniently be used as a storage container for the soiled brush. The solvents are retained in the paint, thus keeping the latter from hardening over quite substantial periods of time. In many instances,- it is then not necessary to clean the brush after each painting operation. In any event, the brush can be laid aside until a convenient time for cleaning is reached.

If it is desired to clean the brush, a very convenient mode of operation is illustrated in FIGURE 3, in which it is shown that an appropriate cleaner, such as a solvent liquid indicated at 23, is poured into the glove and a rubber band, such as the band 20, is doubled one or several times about the top portion 19, thus confining the top portion tightly about the handle to prevent spillage or evaporational losses of solvent. For purposes of removing residues of paint from the bristle portion of the brush, the container and the brush therein may beshaken to slosh the solvent through the bristles. Also, the bristle portion in the covering glove may be twisted and kneaded in the hands of the operator to facilitate washing operations without soiling the hands. If necessary, fresh quantities of solvent may be added, either with or without removal of the solvents containing paint in the glove-like container. Washing may be continued as long as required. If desired at any time to inter rupt the washing operation, the assembly, including brush, solvent and covering, may be stored as by hanging it upon a nail or hook through the medium of the hole 14 in the handle of the brush. At the end of the washing operation, the brush may be removed and dried for subsequent reuse. The glove-like Wrapping, after it is soiled in such washing operation, may be disposed of in any convenient manner, for example, it may be discarded or laid aside for subsequent use in cleaning brushes, or if desired, it may be cleaned for reuse as a covering for a brush or for use in subsequent painting operations. However, since the glove-like coverings are exceedingly inexpensive, cleaning of the covering is seldom necessary, it usually being more convenient to discard the same and to use a fresh covering. for storing the clean brush, or for subsequent painting operations using the same brush.

In FIGURE 5 is'illustrated still another use for the wrapping portion of the units or packages herein disclosed. In accordance with this use, the glove-like wrapping is disposed as a cover over the top of a container 25 for paint, indicated at 26, and having a brush disposed therein. This is admissible, at least in the instances of smaller sizes of the containers, owing to the over-size of the glove-like covering element. The wrist covering portion is slipped down over the top of the container and is held tightly in place about the latter by an appropriate rubber band, e.g., 27, which can be snapped in place, thus providing an effective seal to retain the vapors of the solvents within the container and also preventing contact of air with the surface of the paint. As shown in FIGURE 5, the brush 10 may also be inserted in the container so that both the container and the brush can be set aside for long periods without danger of hardening of the paint, thus necessitating the discarding of valuable materials, and eliminating damage to the brush.

While it is usually preferred to insert the brush within the glove-like wrapping, there may be circumstances which will preclude this. For instance, the brush it may be of large size so that it will not conveniently fit within the wrapping. In the latter instance, the wrapping 15 may be folded over the bristle portion, as shown in FIGURE 6, and held in place by a rubber band, as at B.

The over-size glove-like element having parted finger elements, as shown, constitutes the preferred wrapping because it is considered to give the best packaging effect and the member is more versatile and convenient to use upon the hand. However, it is not precluded to substitute thin plastic mitten-like elements of similar dimensions and having only a parted thumb portion, the rest of the fingers being encased in a common pocket. The brush is inserted in this, the wrist portion is doubled over to enclose the bristles, and a rubber band or an adhesive tape is applied to hold the wrapping in place.

It is also considered that the glove-like element may be replaced by a thin plastic moccasin or overshoe shaped element, with or without ankle extension, which can be drawn over the foot to prevent dropping of paint or other liquids thereupon. A pair of these elements maybe pros vided with each brush. A brush is inserted in, or Wrapped in one or both of these to provide a package.

The forms of the invention as herein shown and described are by way of illustration. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that numerous modifications may be made therein without departure from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A painting unit package comprising a paint applicator having a portion for spreading paint and a handle attached thereto, and a combination wrapping for the applicator and a covering for the hand of the user, said wrapping being in the form of a glove of a size loosely to fit over the hand of the user and having a metacarpus covering portion and individual digit covering portions for each of the fingers and the thumb of the user, the handle of the applicator being disposed in one of the digit covering portions and the portion of the applicator for spreading paint being disposed in the metacarpus covering portion.

2. A painting unit package comprising a paint applicator having a portion for spreading paint and a handle attached thereto, and a combination Wrapping for the applicator and a covering for the hand of the user, said wrapping being in the form of a glove of a size loosely to fit over the hand of the user and having a metacarpus covering portion and individual digit covering portions for each of the fingers and the thumb of the user, the handle of the applicator being disposed in one of the digit covering portions and the portion of the applicator for spreading paint being disposed in the metacarpus covering portion, the said portions of the Wrapping comprising unused digit covering portions being folded over upon the handle of the applicator to provide a package.

3. A painting unit package comprising a paint applicator having a portion for spreading paint and a handle attached thereto, and a combination wrapping for the ap plicator and a covering for the hand of the user, said wrapping being in the form of a glove of a size loosely to fit over the hand of the user and having a metacarpus covering portion and individual digit covering portions for each of the fingers and the thumb of the user, the handle of the applicator being disposed in one of the digit covering portions and the portion of the applicator for spreading paint being disposed in the metacarpus covering portion, the said portions of the Wrapping comprising unused digit covering portions being folded over upon the handle of the applicator to provide a package, the wrist covering portion of the wrapper being folded down over the tip portion of the applicator to encase the same.

4. A painting unit package comprising a paint brush having a bristle portion for spreading paint and a handle attached thereto, and a combination wrapping for the brush and protector for covering the hand of the user, said Wrapping being in the form of an over-sized glove formed of sheet plastic adapted to resist the action of solvents, detergents, paint removers and chemicals, and having a metcarpus covering portion and individual digit covering portions for each of the fingers and the thumb of the user, the handle of the brush being inserted in one of the digit covering portions and the bristle portion of the brush being disposed in the metacarpus covering portion of the glove.

5. A paintaing unit package comprising a brush having a bristle portion for spreading paint and a handle attached thereto, and a combination Wrapping for the brush and protector for covering the hand of the user during painting operations, said wrapping being in the form of a glovelike garment for covering the hand of the user and being of a size loosely to fit over the hand of the user, and being formed of a plastic material which is resistant to such agencies as paint solvents, cleaners and paint removers, and having a metacarpus covering portion and individual digit covering portions, the handle of the brush being inserted in one of said digit covering portions and the bristle portion being inserted in the metacarpus covering portion, said brush being transferable when in use in painting operations from the hand of the user to the wrapping by grasping the bristle portion of the brush in the hand covered by the wrapping, and stripping the Wrapping from the metacarpus portion of the grasping hand back over the handle of the brush.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,150,207 Klein Aug. 17, 1915 2,782,912 Humphrey Feb. 26, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 718,657 France Nov. 5, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1150207 *Jul 25, 1914Aug 17, 1915William M KleinSanitary package for shavers' use.
US2782912 *Sep 10, 1953Feb 26, 1957Humphrey James GCleaning unit package
FR718657A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3214778 *May 23, 1963Nov 2, 1965Robert V MathisonPaint applicators and kits
US3224031 *Jul 6, 1962Dec 21, 1965Leland Ragnvald GFountain paint rollers
US3905476 *Sep 3, 1974Sep 16, 1975Foreman LesterLiner for maintaining paint and brush and method for using same
US4181222 *Dec 1, 1977Jan 1, 1980Peter KepetsEtching, plating, developing; transparent, flexibile container
US4186955 *Feb 1, 1978Feb 5, 1980Owl-Cam Inc.Waste matter removal implement and receptacle
US4499817 *Mar 8, 1983Feb 19, 1985Janssen Alexander PDisposable cooking bags
US4873919 *Apr 28, 1989Oct 17, 1989Janssen Alexander PDisposable bags
US4967903 *Dec 9, 1987Nov 6, 1990Lynted CorporationUsed paint brush preservation device
US5032188 *May 8, 1990Jul 16, 1991Lynted CorporationMethod for paint brush preservation and storage
US5044265 *Dec 8, 1988Sep 3, 1991Janssen Alexander PCooking utensil accessories
US5174445 *Nov 7, 1991Dec 29, 1992Mull Robert LPaint brush storage bag assembly
US7008133 *Aug 5, 2003Mar 7, 2006Tmp Technologies, Inc.Disposable single-use applicator
EP1786702A2 *Sep 12, 2005May 23, 2007Johnhart Properties, LLCPaint paraphernalia method and apparatus
WO2007111932A2 *Mar 22, 2007Oct 4, 2007Stoddart GaryDevice and method for removal, storage, and disposal of paint roller covers
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/223, 206/361, 206/806, 206/229, 2/16
International ClassificationB65D85/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/00, Y10S206/806
European ClassificationB65D85/00