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Publication numberUS3028992 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 10, 1962
Filing dateAug 24, 1959
Priority dateAug 24, 1959
Also published asDE1176505B
Publication numberUS 3028992 A, US 3028992A, US-A-3028992, US3028992 A, US3028992A
InventorsBucher Lawrence E, Eastin William C, Hug Richard C
Original AssigneeClayton Corp Of Delaware Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reusable tamper-indicating container closure
US 3028992 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1962' 1.. E. BUCHER ETAL 3,028,992

REUSABLE TAMPER-INDICATING CONTAINER CLOSURE Filed Aug. 24, 1959 FIG. 4.

FIG.

FIG. 2.

INVENTORS LAWRENCE E. BUCHER RICHARD C. HUG AN WILLIAM C. EASTIN FIG 9 ATTORNEY FIG. 8.

3,028,992 Patented Apr. 10, 1962 The present invention relates to valve covers for product dispensers, such as valved, pressurized aerosol dispensers commonly used for providing sprays, foams and the like.

A protective valve closure or cap is ordinarily provided to avoid inadvertent discharge of the container contents, and protection during shipment and handling. Some of such valve covering closures heretofore in use have been molded of relatively soft polyethylene material which is readily flexed to permit removal of the closure. Such closures may be subject to the objection that they do not protect the contents of the container from tampering. Ina'smuch as the containers commonly used as such dispens ing v containers (for example, low pressure cans) are opaque, the consumer cannot detect whether a portion Another form of prior art closure is that shown in the patent to Soifer, No. 2,643,915, which discloses a cap molded of a brittle or frangibleplastic material such as polystyrene, equipped with a break-out tab or lever in angular registration with a retention tooth, the tab and tooth being circumscribed by a break-out line. When the retention tooth is broken from the cap by means of the lever provided, a prospective purchaser may see that the can has theretofore been broken. However, once the break-out tab is removed, the cap is without this retention tooth, and when reapplied does not adhere as tightly to the mouth of the container as may be desired for certain uses. 7

The purposes of the present invention include achieving the advantages and overcoming the disadvantages of both of these prior art types, by utilizing a cap which is superficially similar to that of the Soifer patent, but different in the certain significant particulars, including the follow- Instead of utilizing a brittle plastic material, it utilizes a tough material possessing strength in both tension and torsion. A somewhat hardened polyethylene material is the best practical, commercially available material for this purpose successfully used. In addition, the break-out provision in the cap does not extend entirely to the base of the tooth, but instead stops short of the lower rim, leaving tough twistable retention bands holding the tooth in place on the cap. These bands may extend and twist somewhat, thus permitting a radially outward displacement and a cocking or tilting displacement of the tooth. A still further difference is the provision of a thickened base projecting externally from the tooth so that when the lever is pressed downward, the base will bear downward against a shoulder on the container, extend and twist the retention bands,.and raise the cap from the mouth of the container.

- In the accompanyingdrawings:

FIGURE 1 is a rear elevational view of a closure incorporating the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevation thereof.

FIGURE 3 is a bottom view thereof.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged section, shown fragmentarily,

of a closure in place on a dispensing container shown in phantom lines.

FIGURE 6 is a further enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 6--6 of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the retention tooth and break-out provision, as seen from the inside of the cap.

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to FIGURE 5 showing the break-out provision broken through but the tooth still engaged beneath the ledge outward of the container mouth.

FIGURE 9 is a view similar to FIGURE 8 showing the break-out lever pressed further downward to form a fulcrum against the container shoulder, lifting the closure from the container mouth.

The closure hereafter described is intended for use in combination with a typical dispensing container such as the can generally designated 11 in FIGURE 5, having a tapering upper wall 12 terminating in a radially inward extending, slightly tapered shoulder 13 which extends inward to the mouth 14, and is there provided with an upwardly extending rounded lip 15. The lip 15 is covered with the outwardly rounded rim '16 of a mounting cup generally designated 17, at whose center is mounted a valving spout 18. The outer edge of the rim 16 extends outwardly and downwardly over the lip 15 of the container,

terminating in a downward presented ledge 19 which is presented spacedly above the shoulder 1'3. These portions are utilized for latching the closure 20, as hereinafter described.

The closure 26 hereinbefore referred to is molded preferably of polyethylene, hardened somewhat more than polyethylene heretofore commonly in use but nevertheless of a grade and composition which is characterized by toughness, a degree of extensibility in tension, and ability to resist torsion or twist. This material is neither brittle nor frangible in the sense that the polystyrene caps (heretofore utilized for tamper-indicating closures as in the Sofier patent) are frangible. Nevertheless this material will fracture after being stretched or extended, a quality which is availed of to advantage, as hereinafter disclosed.

Any other moldable plastic having similar physical char-.

acteristics could be substituted.

The closure formed by molding such a plastic is generally designated 20 and, as illustrated, comprises an upper cap portion including a top 21, and ribbed, slightly tapering upper sidewall 22, an outward flared shoulder 23, and a substantially cylindrical lower skirt portion 24 which extends approximately the full height of the container lip 15 and down to the container shoulder, adjacent to which it presents a lower rim 25.

The lower skirt portion 24 has an inner diameter slightly greater than the outer diameter of the mounting cup 17 at and above the ledge 19; but interrupted by certain inward projecting portions which serve to hold the closure 29 in place. These inward projecting portions include several vertically-extending, inward-projecting ridges 26, spaced from each other, there being four shown in FIG- URE 3; a fixed tooth 27 (also referred to as a fixed retention segment) extending inward, approximately in the plane of the lower edge rim 25, an amount slightly greater than the inward projection of the vertical ridges 26, but being shallow enough to fit between the ledge 19 and the shoulder 13; and a latching tooth or retention segment 28, spaced diametrically opposite the fixed tooth 27, and,-

as shown, being of the same general size and proportions. Both the fixed tooth 27 and the latching tooth 28 extend horizontally for some convenient length, which may be an arcuate distance of approximately thirty degrees (30),

more or less, with Wide latitude for increase and decrease,

as will be understood from a consideration of their func- 3 tions. For engaging beneath the ledge 19, both the fixed tooth 27 and the latching tooth 28 are provided with a somewhat tapering upper surface 29, extending downward and inward, whereby to engage beneath the ledge 19 when the closure 20 is in place as shown in FIG- URE 5.

On the outer side of the skirt portion 24 is integrally molded an externally thickened lever base portion 30, from which projects upward and outward a latching lever 31 including a rounded upper manipulation portion 32, to be depressed by applying a thumb or finger thereto. The lever base portion 39 has a lower surface 33 extending radially outward to a somewhat rounded fulcrum tip portion 34. The under surface 33 of the unbroken closure 20 shown in FIGURE 5 is at a level above but fairly closely adjacent to the container shoulder 13.

At the level of the closure rim 25, as shown in FIG- URES 3, 6, and 7, the rim 25 is continuous, the portions therein on both sides adjacent to the latching tooth 28 being referred to as the retention band portions 35. These retention band portions 35 have a depth, extending upwardly from the rim 25, at least as great as the depth of the latching tooth 28. Immediately above them, however, are the lower ends of a thinned break-out line 36 which extends upward to and nearly completely circumscribes the upper portion of the lever base 30. Well above the retention band portions 35, and preferably at top center as shown in FIGURE 7, is a fracturable skirt portion 37, which interrupts the break-out line 36. This fracturable skirt portion 37 is shown intact in FIGURES 5 and 7, and fractured in FIGURES 8 and 9. Over a portion of the lengths of the break-out line 36 between the fracturable skirt portion 37 and the retention band portions 35, the break-out line 36 may be thinned to zero thickness; that is, it may include elongated apertures 38.

.fter the can 11 has been filled, the mounting cup 17 crimped in place and the container gassed through the valving spout 18, the closure 20 is engaged over the ledge 19 by pressing it downward, the skirt portion 24 flexing as a whole to permit engagement. The tapering upper surfaces 29 of the latching tooth 28 and fixed tooth 27 press securely against the under surface of the ledge 19, with the rim presented closely adjacent to, or in contact with, the inner portion of the shoulder 13. The closure 20 cannot be removed merely by hand; and the 'use of any tool would cause fracture in the skirt portion 24, most likely in the break-out line 36.

When one presses his finger against the rounded upper lever portion 32, and pushes downward and slightly outward, the polyethylene plastic material at the fracturable point 37 first elongates but then breaks out as shown in FIGURE 8. The retention band portions 35 however merely twist slightly, as shown by the rotation of the latching tooth 28 in that figure. The under surface 33 of the lever base portion 30 is thus brought against the container shoulder 13 well outward of the latching tooth 28. Further continued pressure on the rounded upper portion 32 of the lever 31 brings its fulcrum tip portion 34 against the shoulder 13, exerting such a force as to put tension in the retention band portions 35 and somewhat distort the rim 2-5 in the region of such portions, thus permitting the latching tooth 28 to be displaced radially outward sufiicient to clear the lip 19 and slide upward along the mounting cup rim 16. The lever 31 thus raises the closure 20 from the shoulder 13 as shown in FIG- URE 9, as the retention band portions 35 are further twisted. Due to toughness of the material, the extension and twisting of the retention band portions 35 does not break them off; so the cap can be reused.

After the fracturable portion 37 has been parted, the twisting of the retention band portions 35 may begin. The fracturable portion 37 is located so prominently, that breakage there is easily, noted. Any break in the material at the fracturable portion 37 will signal to the user that the closure 20 has already been broken. Thereafter the lever 31 will not stay in an upright position shown in FIGURE 5, but tends rather to droop to the position shown in FIGURE 8.

It will be apparent that the present invention is utilizable on other types of containers than that shown, as well as for other types of products than those discussed. In particula-r, it is intended for use with containers having seamed top walls, ordinarily slightly domed, wherein such top wall serves the function of the shoulder 13 shown in the present illustrations. Also, the closure may be utilized with pressure bottles and other containers having parts equivalent to those described. Furthermore, changes may be made in parts and portions utilized, as will be apparent to those familiar with the art to which the subject-matter pertains, without departing from the scope of the present invention. Accordingly, the invention is not to be construed narrowly, but instead as fully coextensive with the claims which follow.

We claim:

1. A reusable tamper-indicating container closure, comprising an integral cap formed of a tough and resilient plastic material and having a lower edge rim including a retention tooth, and externally thickened portion in angular registration with the tooth, said thickened portion 5 having a lever portion projecting therefrom, there being a thinned break-out line upward adjacent the tooth, the breakout line having ends extending downwardly on both sides of said thickened portion and stopping short of the lower edge of the rim, together with extensible, twistable retention bands in the periphery of the rim beneath the ends of said line on both sides of the retention tooth.

2. A reusable tamper-indicating container closure comprising a cap structure integrally formed of tough and resilient plastic and having a skirt portion terminating in a lower continuous circular rim, a locking tooth projecting radially inwardly from a portion of said rim, an externally thickened portion of said skirt projecting radially outward from the lower edge of the rim and located in angular registration with the locking tooth, a lever extending from the externally thickened portion, and a break-out line having lower ends spacedly upward from the lower edge of the rim, said line extending upwardly from said ends to demarcate the upper part of the externally thickened skirt portion, together with extensible, twistable retention bands in the periphery of the rim on both sides of the locking tooth beneath the ends of said break-out line.

3. For use in dispensing containers and the like, a reusable break-indicating closure comprising a cap molded of a plastic material characterized by toughness in tension and torsion and including integrally a cover portion having a skirt, a retention segment at the lower edge of the skirt extending inwardly therefrom, an externally projecting lever in angular registration with the retention segment, and fracturable break-through means formed in the skirt upwardly adjacent the retention segment and having ends stopping short of the lower edge, together with extensible twistable integral retention band portions at both sides of the retention segment immediately beneath the ends of the break-through means.

4. The combination comprising a container including a mouth having a circumferential ledge and a shoulder extending radially outward from the mouth beneath the ledge, together with a one-piece molded cap formed of a tough and resilient plastic material and having a closure skirt fitting radially outward of the container mouth, the skirt terminating in a lower edge rim presented against the container shoulder, the rim including an inward-projecting retention tooth engageable beneath the ledge, the skirt having a fulcrum portion extending outward at a level above and adjacent to the container shoulder, said portion being in angular registration with the tooth, said portion having a lever extending therefrom, there being a break-out portion in the skirt upwardly immediately adjacent the tooth, and extensible, twistable integral retention bands in the lower edge periphery of the rim at both sides of the tooth, whereby, on fracture of the breakout portion, the fulcrum portion may bear against the container shoulder to disengage the retention tooth from beneath the ledge.

5. A reusable container closure comprising a cap structure integrally formed of a plastic material characterized by toughness in tension and torsion, and having a skirt portion terminating in a lower continuous circular rim, a locking tooth projecting radially inward from a portion of said rim, a line perforated through the skirt above the locking tooth, said line having an end at each side of the tooth, extensible twistable retention bands in the periphery of the rim beneath the ends of said line on both 6. The combination comprising a container including a mouth having a circumferential ledge, together with a onepiece molded cap formed of a tough and resilient plastic material and having a closure skirt fitting radially outward of the container mouth, the skirt terminating in a lower edge rim including an inward-projecting retention tooth engageable beneath the ledge and an outward-projecting lever in angular registration with the tooth, the skirt having a line perforated therethrough and extending over the tooth and lever, said line having lower ends spaced closely above the rim on both sides of the tooth whereby to constitute the portions of the rim beneath the ends of the line as extensible, twistable integral retention bands.

Spender May 10, 1949 Sofier June 23, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2470057 *Dec 6, 1945May 10, 1949Scovill Manufacturing CoTamperproof screw closure
US2643015 *Dec 8, 1949Jun 23, 1953Dev Res IncTamperproof container closure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3097758 *Jul 21, 1961Jul 16, 1963Gershen Irvin JPilfer proof cap for aerosol containers
US3125259 *Apr 14, 1961Mar 17, 1964 Two-part closure with frangible elements
US3128004 *Apr 12, 1962Apr 7, 1964Clayton Corp Of DelawareSelf-lifting locking cap for aerosol containers and the like
US3149717 *Aug 27, 1962Sep 22, 1964Johnson & JohnsonContainer for hypodermic needle
US3165223 *Jan 25, 1963Jan 12, 1965Sargent Paint Mfg CompanyContainer closure
US3170603 *Dec 31, 1962Feb 23, 1965Gary L KittermanTamperproof container closure
US3206111 *Dec 17, 1963Sep 14, 1965Labe Louis ATamper-proof cover for coin boxes
US3292257 *Jul 24, 1964Dec 20, 1966Popeil Samuel JCulinary device for shelling corn, coring and such
US3414167 *Mar 9, 1967Dec 3, 1968Osrow Products Company IncTamperproof overcap for a valved pressure-loaded container
US3480184 *Jul 20, 1967Nov 25, 1969Landis Henry RichardProtective closure for aerosol containers
US3662915 *Oct 8, 1970May 16, 1972Dougherty BrosTamper proof package
US3888383 *Aug 17, 1973Jun 10, 1975Bowater Packaging LtdContainer having a tamperproof closure
US3917101 *May 19, 1972Nov 4, 1975Ware Fuse CorpOutlet box and method of making the same
US3927796 *Apr 16, 1975Dec 23, 1975Whitehouse Harvey BContainer and closure therefor
US4347940 *Apr 10, 1981Sep 7, 1982The Continental Group, Inc.Lever-off tamper-indicating composite closure
US4942977 *Dec 8, 1988Jul 24, 1990Hidding Daniel PBreakaway tamper evident cover
US4962864 *Jan 23, 1989Oct 16, 1990Clayton CorporationTamper-evident aerosol cap
US5722568 *Sep 13, 1996Mar 3, 1998Summit Packaging Systems, Inc.Tamper-evident aerosol cap
US6070765 *Jun 17, 1998Jun 6, 2000Delta Industries, Inc.Tampering indicating cover for aerosol valve
US20080078736 *Sep 29, 2006Apr 3, 2008Clayton CorporationTamper evident cover for an aerosol can
USD740661 *May 12, 2014Oct 13, 2015Gateway Plastics, Inc.Closure with integrated dosage cup
EP0063001A1 *Mar 31, 1982Oct 20, 1982The Continental Group, Inc.Lever-off tamper-indicating composite closure
WO1982003613A1 *Apr 1, 1982Oct 28, 1982Continental GroupLever-off tamper-indicating composite closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/270, 222/182
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/40, B65D2101/003
European ClassificationB65D83/40