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Publication numberUS3031711 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1962
Filing dateOct 26, 1959
Priority dateOct 26, 1959
Publication numberUS 3031711 A, US 3031711A, US-A-3031711, US3031711 A, US3031711A
InventorsMoe Herman, Sam Herman
Original AssigneeMoe Herman, Sam Herman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe polishing kit
US 3031711 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1, 1962 S. HERMAN ET AL SHOE POLISHING KIT Filed Oct. 26, 1959 INVENTORS SIQM HERMFJN MOE HERM FIN ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,031,711 SHOE POLISHING KIT Sam Herman, 41 Vista Road, Roslyn Heights, N.Y., and

This invention concerns a novel shoe polishing kit.

According to the invention there is provided a can containing shoe polish in liquid form. The can is shaped to provide a plurality of fiat walls. One or more of the walls are provided with means for permanently or removably supporting a brush, mohair or other cloth buffer, and the like. The brush and buffer may be mounted on a plate slidably receivable in a channel plate secured to the body of the can. The fiat walls of the can are so shaped that they can be grasped conveniently for applying the brush or buffer to a shoe being shined after application of the shoe polish thereon.

It is therefore a principal object of the invention to provide a shoe polishing kit including a can with flat walls, at least one of the walls supporting a brush or bufler.

A further object is to provide a shoe polishing kit including a can containing liquid shoe polish, the can having flat walls removably supporting a brush and buffer.

A still further object is to provide a shoe polishing kit of the character described wherein the brush and buffer are mounted on resilient spongy bases.

A still further object is to provide a shoe polishing kit of the character described wherein at least one fiat wall of the can is provided with channeled means for removably retaining the brush and buffer thereon;

Another object is to provide a combination brush and buffer member adapted for use with a flat walled can having channeled means for removably retaining said member thereon.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a can embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a brush and butter member adapted for use with the can of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the can of FIG. 1 with the brush and buffer member of FIG. 2 mounted thereon.

In FIG. 1 is shown a form of can 20 for liquid shoe polish which is rectangular in cross section and which carries a channel plate 36 on one side. The flanges 38*- are flexible as indicated by arrows A and a bottom ledge 61 is provided which extends outwardly from the plate underneath the free ends of the flanges. A notch 63 is formed in ledge 6-1.

A brush and buffer member 70 shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 is provided for use with can 20d. This member has a central plate 72 to opposite sides of which resilient pads 74 and 76 are secured by adhesive 73, 75. A buffer element 77 and a brush plate 78 carrying bristles 79 are secured to the respective pads 74, 76 by adhesive 81, 83. Corners 72 of the substantially rectangular plate 72 are rounded so that the plate can be slipped into the channel plate 3'6 between the flanges 38 and will be frictionally gripped by the flexible walls thereof. The

3,031,711 Patented May 1, 1362 ice sides 37 of the flanges should have widths slightly less than the combined thickness of the members 72, 74 and 77 on the buifer side and less than the combined thickness of members 72-, 78, 79 on the brush side. This will insure that the member is somewhat compressed between the inturned flanges 38 and the plate 36t to increase the frictional grip of the member 7t on the can. Thus, when the can 20 is grasped by the user and moved briskly over a shoe with a reciprocating motion longitudinally of the can, the member 70 will not come loose from the channel plate 36 Notch 6-3 permits the user to push the member 7% with his thumb for removing the member when it is desired to reverse the position from that shown in 3 for positioning the brush portion outwardly. The bristles act as spring elements along with the spongy resilient pad 76 in frictionally retaining the member 70 in the channel plate as shown in FIG. 3. When the member 70 is in reversed position, the resilient pad 74 and butter pad 77 cooperate to frictionally retain the member '79 in the channel plate.

While we have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of our invention, it is to be understood that we do not limit ourselves to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A polishing kit comprising an elongated hollow casing with fiat walls, rectangular in cross section constituting a container for shoe cleaning liquid, said casing having an outlet at one end, a channel-shaped plate on the outer surface of one wall, opening outwardly thereof for removably receiving a shoe cleaning member, and a ledge extending outwardly of said one wall slightly below the bottom end of: the channel-shaped plate, said ledge having a central notch to facilitate manipulation of the inserted shoe cleaning member, opposed flat walls of the casing serving as a handle for manipulating the kit 2. A polishing kit comprising an elongated hollowcasing with fiat walls, said casing being rectangular in cross section and constituting a container for shoe cleaning liquid, said casing having an outlet at one end, a channel-shaped plate on the outer surface of one wall, opening outwardly thereof for reniovably receiving and supporting a shoe cleaning device, and a ledge extending outwardly of said one wall slightly below the bottom end of the channel-shaped plate, said ledge having a central notch to facilitate manipulation of the inserted shoe cleaning device, opposed flat Walls of the casing serving as a handle for manipulating the kit, said shoe cleaning device constituting a plate having a butler element on one face thereof and bristles on the opposite face thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 815,934 Rogers Mar. 20, 1906 1,219,504 Summer Mar. 20, 1917 2,743,474 Johnson May 1, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 524,417 Canada May 1, 1956 1,100,275 France Mar. 30, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US815934 *Oct 12, 1904Mar 20, 1906George H RogersShoe-polishing outfit.
US1219504 *Apr 13, 1916Mar 20, 1917Gustave SummerBrush.
US2743474 *Jun 1, 1953May 1, 1956Johnson Carl EShoeshine kit
CA524417A *May 1, 1956Neubecker ArthurCombination shoe brush and liquid applicator
FR1100275A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3110917 *Jun 18, 1962Nov 19, 1963Mcpeek Jr Lewis DChalk board eraser
US3375538 *Apr 12, 1967Apr 2, 1968Domtar LtdOvercap assemblies
US3885264 *Sep 7, 1973May 27, 1975Nippon Seal CoCleaning brush with dust removing and collecting means
US3925843 *Oct 29, 1974Dec 16, 1975Tsuruzawa TeruyaCleaning brush device
US4955747 *Nov 27, 1989Sep 11, 1990Tarver Matthew AApplicator and polishing device
US5558453 *May 18, 1995Sep 24, 1996Gojo Industries, Inc.Container and applicator combination
US6279188 *Jun 9, 1999Aug 28, 2001Robyn BarwinLiquid dispenser and applicator
US6948874 *Aug 21, 2003Sep 27, 2005Roberson Orin AApparatus for erasing and cleaning a marker board
US7273326 *Aug 4, 2004Sep 25, 2007Jones Garon GFluid container with integral brush
US8302615 *Jun 8, 2009Nov 6, 2012L'orealApplicator for a cosmetic product
US20030204928 *May 2, 2002Nov 6, 2003Shockley H. DavidScreen cleaner and utensil container
US20040037612 *Aug 21, 2003Feb 26, 2004Roberson Orin A.Apparatus for erasing and cleaning a marker board
US20050271453 *Jun 4, 2004Dec 8, 2005Haneda John YLotion application apparatus
US20060029458 *Aug 4, 2004Feb 9, 2006Jones Garon GFluid container with integral brush
US20080034520 *Jul 19, 2007Feb 14, 2008Aaron HeapCleaning device for golf equipment
US20080276397 *May 10, 2007Nov 13, 2008Schippers John FAudible Footwear Brush
US20090301512 *Jun 8, 2009Dec 10, 2009L'orealApplicator for a cosmetic product
US20110052307 *Aug 26, 2010Mar 3, 2011Taiwan Bor Ying CorporationTwo-in-one screen cleansing device
US20170065139 *Sep 3, 2015Mar 9, 2017The Procter & Gamble CompanyUnitary cleaning device having onboard replaceable cleaning pad and onboard replaceable cleaning solution
US20170065140 *Sep 3, 2015Mar 9, 2017The Procter & Gamble CompanyFoam cleaning device having onboard replaceable cleaning pad and onboard replaceable cleaning solution
WO2010086532A1 *Feb 1, 2010Aug 5, 2010Christophe GalanDevice for applying, spreading and polishing with shoe polish or wax
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/27, 401/139, 401/123, 15/258
International ClassificationA47L23/05, A47L23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/05
European ClassificationA47L23/05