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Publication numberUS3032254 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1962
Filing dateAug 20, 1959
Priority dateAug 20, 1959
Publication numberUS 3032254 A, US 3032254A, US-A-3032254, US3032254 A, US3032254A
InventorsJames C Wilson
Original AssigneeOwens Illinois Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping container
US 3032254 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1, 1962 J. c. WILSON 3,032,254

SHIPPING CONTAINER Filed Aug. 20. 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

May 1, 1962 J. c. WILSON SHIPPING CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 20. 1959 3,032,254 SHIPPING CQNTAINER James C. Wilson, Jacksonville, Fla., assigner to Owens- Illinois Glass Company, a corporation of Ohio Filed Aug. 20, 1959, Ser. No. 835,121 16 Claims. (Cl. 229-37) The present invention relates to the construction of a shipping container.

The container here specifically disclosed is particularly well adapted for the storage, handling and shipment of substantial amounts or" material, e.g. twenty-live gallons of liquid contained within a sealed sac, but it is capable of more general application. Certain problems involved in the storage and handling of such large amounts of ma-` terial have proved very troublesome in the past. The weight of the container contents makes it ditiicult to handle containers of this type and also places great stress on the container walls, thus ordinarily requiring the use of exceptionally strong, and hence expensive, materials in the formation of the container. Moreover, it is customary in storage and shipment to stack the filled containers on top of one another, thus placing very great compressive forces on the lowerrnost containers of the stack, giving rise to a tendency toward bulging, particularly where the contents of the containers are such as to have a flow characteristic (liquids, semi-solids, fruits and vegetables, for example). Moreover, when containers generally have a cross-sectional shape other than of a square or rectangle, there is a tendency on the part of such containers to fold or collapse about their axis, requiring the use of internal rigidiiying panels to cause the containers to retain their desired cross-sectional shape. It is often a delicate matter properly to insert such rigidifying panels into the container and retain such panels in rigidifying position, making for time consuming diiiiculty, and hence expense, in the erection of the containers. In addition, the jostling or handling to which the containers may be subjected will often have the tendency of causing those form-retaining inserts to shift from proper position, thus militating against their proper performance of the function for which they were designed.

In accordance with the present invention heavy duty containers of the type under discussion can be made from inexpensive materials of moderate strength such as corrugated paperboard or the like of appropriate Weight. Exceptional strength is imparted to the containers, eiiectively preventing bulging or distortion even when the containers are subjected to exceptionally high compressive forces, by forming the side walls of the container from a plurality of series of side wall sections, the sections of each series being circumferentially offset relative to the sections of adjacent series and connected thereto by means of foldlines of desirably zig-Zag configuration. Maintenance of proper cross sectional shape is ensured by inserting into the containers an appropriately shaped panel which engages the inner surfaces of the side wall sections of one of the aforementioned series of sections. Portions of the side wall sections between which the panel is to be retained are bent inwardly from the side wall sections proper so as to produce upwardly facing surfaces upon which the shape-retaining panel is adapted to rest, thus permitting the panel to be merely dropped into the container. In the specific embodiment here disclosed the panel is retained against upward displacement by means of flaps bent down from the upper ends of at least some of the side walls sections. The openings in the side walls proper produced by the inbending of the side wall portions on which the shape-retaining panel is adapted to rest may be used for lifting purposes, thus facilitating manipulation of the containers by means of appropriate machinery.

The construction is such that the containers may be formed from blanks of sheet material in an efficient and relatively inexpensive manner.

To the accomplishment of the above, and to such other objects as may hereinafter appear, the present invention relates to the construction of a shipping container as delined in the appended claims, and as described in this specification, taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. l is a top plan view of a blank from which the body of the container may be formed;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the form-retaining panel;

FIG. 3 is a three-quarter perspective view of the erected container;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional vieW taken along the line 4 4 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 5 is a top plan View of the erected container; and

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional View taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 4.

The container as here specilically disclosed comprises a body portion formed from the blank A of FIG. 1 and one or more internal rigidifying panels defined by the blank B of FIG. 2. The blank A comprises an upper series of side wall sections 2 connected to one another by foldlines 4, an intermediate series of side wall sections 6 connected to one another by foldlines 8, and a lower series of side wall sections 10 foldably connected to one another at the points 12. The series of side wall sections 2 are offset laterally (circumferentially relative to the erected container) from the series of side wall sections 6 and are connected thereto by means of the foldlines 14 which impart interlitting pointed or generally triangular areas to the sections 2 and 6. The same basic relationship exists between the side wall sections 6 and 10 as between the sections 6 and 2, the Zig-zag foldlines 16 being interposed between the sections 6 and 10.

Bottom cover flaps 18 are secured to the lower edges of the side wall sections 10 by means of foldlines 20. Flaps 22 are secured to the upper edges of the side wall sections 2 by means of foldlines 24, and the flaps 22 are provided with extensions 26 connected thereto by means of foldlines 28.

A plurality of the foldlines 4 between adjacent side wall sections 2 (here designated 4a for purposes of identitication) are intersected by cuts 30 which extend into certain of the side wall sections 2 (here designated 2a for purposes of identiiication) on either side of the foldlines 4a for short distances, and downwardly extending foldlines 32 extend from the ends of the cuts 30 to the foldlines 4a, thereby producing bendable side Walls portions 34.

The container body is erected by folding the side wall sections 2, 6 and 1th about the foldlines 4 and 8 and the points 12 to define a generally tubular structure, end portions of the blank A being overlapped and secured together in any appropriate manner as by adhesive or staples. The bottom flaps 18 are folded in at right angles to the side Wall sections 10 to which they are connected and interlock with one another, as may best be seen from FIG. 6, in order to define the bottom wall of the container.

As here specilically disclosed the container is in the general form of a hexagon when viewed in cross section. In order to assist it in retaining this generally hexagonal shape, an internally rigidifying panel 36 is dropped into the container so as to rest upon the infolded and interlocked bottom flaps 1S, the panel 36 engaging the inner surfaces of the side wall sections 10 and imparting shape rigidiiication to the bottom of the container.

The container, with its top still open, is then filled with whatever contents are desired-a sealed sac of liquid such as milk or orange concentrate, loose fruit. or vege- 3 tables, bags of semi-solid or granular material, or the like. The container is adapted to 'oe filled to a point no higher than the cuts 30 which intersect the foldlines 4a.

Next the side wall portions 34 are bent inwardly, as permitted by the cut 30, the foldlines 32, and those portions of the foldlines 4a which run through the portions 34. As may best be seen in FIG. 4, the upper edges of the side wall portions 34 will then face up-wardly inside the periphery of the side wall sections 2. A second rigidifying panel 36 is then dropped into the open top of the container. Its downward movement will be arrested by the inwardly bent side wall portions 34 and it will rest upon the upper edges of those side wall portions 34. Thus the insertion and proper orientation of the upper panel 36 presents no problem whatsoever. The shape of the upper panel 36 is such as to engage the inner surfaces of the side wall sections 2 and thus provide shape rigidication at the upper end of the container.

rthereafter the flaps 22 are bent down around the foldlines 24 inside the container so as to extend along the inner surfaces of the side wall sections 2 to which they are attached. The height of the ilaps 22 is substantially equal to the vertical distance between the foldlines 24 (defining the upper edges of the side wall sections 2) and the cuts 30. Hence the aps 22 will engage the upper rigidifying panel 36 and hold v`it in place against the vupper edges of the inbent side wall portions 34, reliably retaining it against upward dislocation from its desired position. y

The flap extensions 26 here specifically disclosed are adapted to be bent around the foldlines 28 so as to overlie the upper rigidifyin'g panel 36, thereby assisting in retaining it in position, and the side corners of the extensions 26 are adapted to overlap one another, preferably in an over and under relationship as best shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, thereby to lock the aps 22 in proper position.

The thus filled and closed container is now ready' for handling. Ordinarily, because of the weight of the containers, mechanical lift equipment is required for that purpose. The inbending of the side wall portions 34 produces openings in the side wall sections 2 into which the hooks of mechanical lifters may enter, the tips of the hooks engaging the upper rigidifying panel 36, the position of which is reinforced by the aps 22 and the flap extensions 26. Thus the upper portion of the container is rendered capable of withstanding the forces exerted on it when the container and its contents are lfted.

The circumferentially staggered or offset arrangement of the vertically arranged series of side wall sections 2, 6 and 10 impart a marked degree of compressive strength to the container, thus permitting the stacking of a plurality of lled containers one above the other without bulging or distortion. The zig-zag or triangular nature of the lines 14 and 16 between the side wall sections of adjacent series is of significance in this regard. While three series of circumferentially staggered side wall sections are here disclosed, a greater or lesser number of such series could be employed without departing from the kpresent invention.

The shape rigidifying inserts 36 need merely to be dropped into the container and they assume and retain their desired rigidifying position entirely independently of the contents of the container and the manner in which those contents are loaded or the manner in which they may shift their position within the container. The lowermost rigidifying panel 36 rests upon the bottom flaps 18 and is there retained by the weight of the container contents. The upper shape-rigidifying panel 36 rests on the upwardly facing edges of the inwardly bent side wall portions 34 and is there retained by the flaps 22 and the ap extensions'26, if provided. The openings in the side walls produced by the inbending of the side wall portions 34 may be used either for manual or mechanical 4 lifting, the upper panel 36 and the iiaps 22 and extensions 26 assisting in taking up the attendant stresses.

While but a single embodiment of the present invention has been here specifically disclosed, it will be apparent that many variations may be made therein, all within the scope of the instant invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim: V

l. A container comprising side walls extending up to an at least partially open top, portions of said side walls having their upper edges severed from the remainder of said side walls and being bent inwardly from said side walls so as to make an acute angle on the order of 30 therewith, said portions terminating in upwardly facing surfaces located below said open top, and a top wall panel received inside said side walls and resting on said surfaces of said side wall portions.

2. The container of claim l, in which at least some of said side walls are provided, at their upper ends, with tiaps connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent down into said open top, the length of said flaps `being substantially equal to the distance along said side wails between said upper ends of said side walls and the line of severance on said side walldeiining said uppel edges of said inwardly bent side wall portions, thereby beingadapted to retain said top wall panel in position.

3.,The Vcontainer of claim 2, in, which said aps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel.

4. The container of claim 2, in which said flaps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent vat right angles thereto so -as to overlie said top wall panel, said extensions overlapping one another when their respective aps are bent down into said open top.

5. A container comprising side walls extending up to an at least partially open top, said side walls being connected to one another by foldlines, portions of said side walls in line with said foldlines having their upper edges severed from the remainder of said side walls and being bent inwardly from said side walls so as to make an acute angle on the order of 30 therewith, said portions terminating in upwardly facing surfaces located below said open top, and a top wall panel received inside said side walls and resting on said surfaces of said side wall portions.

6. The container of claim 5, in which at least some of said side walls are provided, at their upper ends, with aps connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent down into said open top, the length of said `flaps being substantially equal to the distance along said side walls between said upper ends of said side walls and the line of severance on said side wall defining said upper edges of said inwardly bent side wall portions, thereby being adapted to retain said top wall panel imposition.

7. The container of claim 6, in which said aps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel.

8. The container of claim 6, in which said flaps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel, said extensions overlapping one another when their respective aps are bent down into said open top.

9. A container comprising side walls connected to one another by foldlines and extending up to an at least partially open top, said side walls having substantially horizontal cuts spaced below said open top and crossing and extending short distances to the sides of at least some of said foldlines, said side walls having additional foldlines extending downwardly from the ends of said cuts to said crossed foldlines, thereby producing side wall portions adapted to be bent in from said side walls so as to make an acute angle on the order of 30 therewith and terminating in upper edges spaced below said open top, and a top wall panel received inside said side walls and resting on said upper edges of said side wall portions.

10. The container of claim 9, in which at least some of said side walls are provided, at their upper ends, with flaps connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent down into said open top, the length of said flaps being substantially equal to the distance along said side walls between said upper ends of said side walls and said cuts in said side walls, thereby being adapted to retain said top wall panel in position.

11. The container of claim l0, in which said flaps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel.

12. The container of claim 10, in which said flaps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel, said extensions overlapping one another when their respective aps are bent down into said open top.

13. A container comprising side walls connected to one another to define a generally tubular structure, said side walls comprising a plurality of series of side wall sections, each series extending around said tubular structure, each of said series of sections being at a different level relative to the height of said tubular structure, the sections of each series being circumferentially offset relative to the sections of adjacent series, and the sections of each series being connected to the sections of adjacent series by foldlines, said tubular structure extending up to an at least partially open top, the side wall sections of the uppermost series of sections being connected to one another by foldlines, said last mentioned side wall sections having substantially horizontal cuts spaced below said Open top and crossing and extending short distances to the sides of at least some of said foldlines, said side walls having additional foldlines extending downwardly from the ends of said cuts to said crossed foldlines, thereby producing side wall portions adapted to be bent in from said side walls and terminating in upper edges spaced below said open top, and a top Wall panel received inside said side walls and resting on said upper edges of said side wall portions.

14. The container of claim 13, in which at least some of said side walls are provided, at their upper ends, with aps connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent down into said open top, the length of said aps being substantially equal to the distance along said side walls between said upper ends of said side walls and said cuts in said side walls, thereby being adapted to retain said top wall panel in position.

15. The container of claim 13, in which at least some of said side walls are provided, at their upper ends, with flaps connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent down into said open top, the length of said flaps being substantially equal to the distance along said side walls between said upper ends of said side walls and said cuts in said side Walls, thereby being adapted to retain said top wall panel in position, and in which said flaps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel.

16. The container of claim 13, in which at least some of said side walls are provided, at their upper ends, with ilaps connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent down into said open top, the length of said ilaps being substantially equal to the distance along said side walls between said upper ends of said side walls and said cuts in said side walls, thereby being adapted to retain said top wall panel in position, and in which said aps are provided with extensions connected thereto by foldlines and adapted to be bent at right angles thereto so as to overlie said top wall panel, said extensions overlapping one another when their respective flaps are bent down into said open top.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,050,894 Paige Aug. 11, 1936 2,723,795 MacKenzie Nov. 15, 1955 2,726,803 Ketler Dec. 13, 1955 2,841,319 White et al. July 1, 1958 2,846,133 Burden Aug. 5, 1958 2,884,181 McCormick Apr. 28, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2050894 *May 29, 1934Aug 11, 1936Paige Richard EatonFolded blank box
US2723795 *Jan 25, 1952Nov 15, 1955Stuart Mackenzie DouglasCarton for the packing of fragile articles
US2726803 *Jul 6, 1953Dec 13, 1955Inland Container CorpPacking drum
US2841319 *Jul 18, 1955Jul 1, 1958Lawrence Paper CoShipping container for produce
US2846133 *Dec 31, 1956Aug 5, 1958Burden Edward RSelf-locking folding box
US2884181 *May 9, 1957Apr 28, 1959Fed Carton CorpCarton for bottles or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3252648 *Sep 10, 1964May 24, 1966Waldorf Paper Prod CoRelockable tray
US3269640 *Apr 1, 1965Aug 30, 1966Fed Paper Board Co IncContainer
US3411692 *Nov 8, 1965Nov 19, 1968Fed Paper Board Co IncContainer
US4199098 *Dec 8, 1978Apr 22, 1980Corrugated Paper CorporationContainer polygonal in cross-section collapsible to flat condition
US4244510 *May 23, 1979Jan 13, 1981Engineering Industries, Inc.Bucket-like carton
US4589619 *Feb 14, 1984May 20, 1986Westvaco CorporationFood holder
US4736885 *Apr 23, 1987Apr 12, 1988Fred W. Negus, Sr.For bulk food products
US5253799 *Sep 20, 1990Oct 19, 1993Sebesta Edward HHidden locking tab and slotted flap system for multi-sided packages
US6446859 *Mar 2, 2001Sep 10, 2002John Thomas HolladayFoldable storage container
EP0068334A1 *Jun 18, 1982Jan 5, 1983Toppan Printing Co., Ltd.Paper container for holding high-temperature liquid and method for filling the container with the liquid and sealing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/125.1, 229/125.17, 229/919, D26/130, 229/165, 229/110, 229/900, 229/185, 52/DIG.100, 229/169, 229/108
International ClassificationB65D5/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/919, Y10S229/90, B65D5/12, Y10S52/10
European ClassificationB65D5/12