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Publication numberUS3033264 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1962
Filing dateMar 2, 1960
Priority dateMar 2, 1960
Publication numberUS 3033264 A, US 3033264A, US-A-3033264, US3033264 A, US3033264A
InventorsHenry G Henrickson
Original AssigneeKaiser Aluminium Chem Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method used in making a can body
US 3033264 A
Abstract  available in
Images(16)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 8, 1962 H. G'. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED 1N MAKING A CAN BODY 16 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 2, 1960 HENRY G. HEN PJCKSON ATTORNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

v APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG2 INVENTOR.

HENRY G. HEN RICKSON ATTORNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED 1N MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIGB INVENTOR. HENRY G. HENRICKSON ATTORNEY May s, 1962 H. G. HENRICKSON APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. 'HEN RY G. HENRncKsON BY Wg@ ATTORNEY.

May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY 16 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 2, 1960 INVENTOR. HENRY G. HENRICKSON /-3n (sl-341 BYW@ ATTORNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIG@ INVENTOR.

ENRY G. HENRICKSON ATTORNEY APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 H. G. HENRICKSON May s, 1962 16 Sheets-Sheet 7 May. 8, 1962 H. G. HENRICKSON APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR.

HENRY G, HENRICKSON ATTORNEY 16 Sheets-Sheet 9 www INVENTOR. HENRY G. HENRICKSON BY QAM@ ATTO RNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN APPARATUS AND METHOD usED 1N MAKING A cAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 In! I 4..; H Wml AlllnllE.

May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED 1N MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 10 su g Rf INVENTOR,

HENRY G. HENRI CKSON Bywg@ ATTORNEY APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 1e sham-sheet 11 INVENTOR. HENRY G. HENRICKSON BY g ATTORNEY l -lllllll H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY 16 Sheets-Sheet 12 May 8, 1962 Filed March 2, 1960 M NVENTOR. 410 43 326 HENRY G. HENRncKSON HG2@ By ATTORNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY 16 Sheets-Sheet 13 ,Filed March 2, 1960 INVENTOR. HENRY G. HE'NRICKSON FIG23 ATTORNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED 1N MAKING A CAN BODY med Maron 2, 1960 1e sheets-sheet 14 INVENTOR. HENRY G. HENRICKSON ATTORNEY May 8, 1962 H. G. HENRlcKsoN 3,033,264

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED 1N MAKING A CAN BODY Filed March 2, 1960 D 16 Sheets-Sheet 15 (LQ @d 367 1 \V @ya 442 -nu Ou FIG. 29

FIG-:.28

INVENTOR.

HENRY G. HENR ICKSON F1630 BY ATTORN EY May 8, 1962 3,033,264l

APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BQDY H. G. HENRICKSON Filed March 2, 1960 16 Sheets-Sheet 16 United. States Patent @Ihre l 3,033,264 Patented May 8, 1962 3,033,264 APPARATUS AND METHOD USED IN MAKING A CAN BODY Henry G. Henriekson, Mount Prospect, Ill., assignor to Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation, Oakland, Calif., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 2, 1960, Ser. No. 12,446 27 Claims. (Cl. 153-2) This invention relates generally to apparatus and a method for completing the fabrication of a container or can body which has been previously partially formed. More particularly, it is concerned with improvements in apparatus and a method for completing the operations of trimming a can body to length, beading the wall thereof, and forming a flange at one end of the body.

It is a purpose of this invention to provide an imiprofved apparatus and a method for trimming, beading and ilang. ing can bodies such as for example, can bodies formed during a drawing process and wherein Ia can body has a side wall and end closure all formed integrally with each other from a single metal blank.

Other purposes and objects of the present invention will become apparent from the specification following taken with the drawings which together describe and illustrate a preferred apparatus and method for carrying out the invention herein, and what is now considered to be the best mode of practicing the principles thereof. Gther embodiments of the invention may be suggested to those having the benefit of the teachings herein and such other embodiments are intended to be reserved especially as they fall within the scope of the subjoined claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. l is a front elevational View with parts broken away and shown in section of a can body beading, trimming and fianging apparatus or machine embodying the improvements according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view thereof;

FIG. 3 is an end view looking from the left to the right of the apparatus seen in FIGS. l and 2, showing details of the driving mechanism for the apparatus;

FIG. 4 is an end view looking from the right to the left of the apparatus seen in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 5 is an end elevational view of apparatus for transferring a partly completed body from a feed magazine to a transfer wheel, removing the completed can body from the transfer wheel and on to a delivery chute, said view being taken substantially along the lines 5-5 of FIG. l, and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is 'a front elevaitonal View looking in `the direction of the arrows 6 6 of FIG'. 5;

FIG. 7 is a detailed elevational view of lapparatus for moving a partly completed can body from the transfer wheel seen in FIGS. 5 and 6 to a work spindle seen in FIGS. l and 2, where the operations of trimming, beading and flanging are performed on the can body to complete the same;

FIG. 8 is a schematic elevational view showing details of driving mechanism for the work spindles seen in FIGS. l and 2, said view looking in the direction of the arrows 8-8 of FIG. l;

FIG. 9 is a section taken `along either line 9-9 of FIG. 8, looking in the direction of the arrows, showing details of driving mechanism for the Work spindles;

FIG. l0 is a section taken along the line lil-1i) of FIG. 8, looking in the direction of the arrows, and showing details of a main drive shaft and pulley `for the work spindles;

FIG. l1 is a section taken along either line 11-11 of FIG. 8, looking in the direction of the arrows and showing further details of the driving mechanism for the work spindles;

FIG. l2 is a section taken along the line 1?.-12 of FIG. 8 looking in the direction of the Aarrows and sho-wing details of a belt take up pulley for they spindle driving mechanism seen in FIG. 8;

FIG. 13 is a section taken along ythe line 13-13 of FIG. 8 looking in the direction of the arrows and showing further details of a belt take up pulley for the spindle driving mechanism seen in FIG. 8;

FIG. 14 is an elevational view, parts being shown in longitudinal section, of a head stock turret and the work spindles turning thereon, said view looking -in the direction of the arrows 14-14 of FIGS. l and 2;

FIG. 15 is a detailed longitudinal section taken through a work spindle seen in FIG. 14, said view being to a larger scale than seen in FIG.` 14;

FIG. 16 is a transverse section taken through the work Aspindle seen in FIG. 15, `said view looking in the direction of the arrows 16--16 of FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a detailed elevational view of a slitter knife supported for movement in the work spindle seen in FIG. 14;

FIG. 18 is an end View thereof;

FIG. 19 is a detailed longitudinal sectional view through the work spindle seen in FIG. 14, showing details of mechanism for moving the slitter knife seen in FIGS. 17 and 18 with respect to the work spindle, said view showing the slitter knife in retracted or non-operative position;

FIG. 20 is a view similar to FIG. 19 but showing thev i slitter knife in extended or operative position;

FIG. 21 is a longitudinal sectional View taken along the line 21-21 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows, showing details of mechanism for advancing `a partly completed can body on to a work spindle seen in FIG. 14, and for removing the same therefrom at the completion of the operations on the can body;

FIG. 22 is an elevational View looking in the direction of the arrows 22--22 of FIGS. l, 2 and 14, showing de-I tails of beading and trimming rollers for the can bodies supported 0n the work spindles seen in FIG. 14;

FIG. 23 is a section taken along the line 23-23 of FIG. 22 looking in the direction of the arrows, showing details of the rollers for performing the beading operations on a can body;

FIG. 24 is a section taken along the line 24-24 of FIG. 22 looking in the direction of the arrows, showing details of a scrap corrugating roller and a can trimming rotary knife for the can bodies;

FIG. 25 is an elevational view of cam operated mechanisms mounted on the head stock turret seen in FIG. 14 for controlling the operation of the beading and trimming rollers seen in FIGS. 22 to 24 inclusive, and for controlling the operation of the slitter knife seen in FIGS. 14 to 20 inclusive, said View looking in the direction of the arrows 25-25 of FIGS. l and 2;

FIG. 26 is a sectional view taken along the line 26-26 of FIG. 25 looking in the direction of the arrows, showing further details of the mechanism operating the trimming and beading rollers seen in FIGS. 23 and 24;

FIG. 27 is an elevational view looking in the direction of the arrows 27-27 of FIG. 2.5, showing details of mechanism for controlling the movement of the slitter knife seen in FIGS. 14 to 2() inclusive;

FIG. 28 is an elevational view looking in the direction of the arrows 28-28 of FIG. 2, showing details of a cam for operating the cam follower seen in FIGS. 25 and 27 and the slitter knife seen in FIGS. 14 to 20;

FIG. 29 is an elevational view looking in the direction of the arrows 29-29 of FIGS. l and 2, showing details of a cam for providing the movement of the mechanism seen in FIGS. 22 to 24 inclusive;

FIG. 30 is an elevational view of a cam mechanism supported on the tail stock seen in FIG. 7 for providing the movement of the mechanism seen in FIG. 7; and

FIG. 31 is a development of the profiles of the various cams seen in FIGS. 2S, 29 and 30.

General Description of Mac/zine Referring now to FIGS. l to 7 of the drawings, the trimming, flanging and beading machine according to the present invention is referred to generally by the reference numeral 3S, and as seen particularly in FIGS. 1 and 2, such machine includes a base 32 having feet 33 for adjusting the position thereof. The base 32 supports a driving unit 34 for a head stock 4) which is spaced from a tail stock 40a, the head stock 40 and the tail stock 40a having a main drive shaft 36 supported therebetween. Main drive shaft 36 is in the form of a long quill driving a head stock turret 38 supported at the head stock 4t), a central transfer wheel 39, and a tail stock turret 41 supported at the tail stock 40a.

A magazine 42 is disposed at the rear of the machine seen in FIGS. l and 2 at the central transfer wheel 39, and is adapted to feed partly completed can bodies 43 to the central transfer wheel 39, such partly completed can bodies being shown in FIGS. 4 and 7. The can bodies 43 fed to the central transfer wheel 39 are moved therefrom by longitudinal movement of the can body transfer members or pusher mandrels 45 extending from the tail stock turret 41 and turning therewith. The partly completed can bodies 43 are each moved from the transfer wheel 39 and on to a rotating work spindle 44 extending from the head stock turret 38.

All of the operations of trimming the partly completed can bodies 43 to proper length, removing the trim scrap therefrom, placing a ange 46 on the can body as seen in FIG. 6, beading the can body to stiffen same, if desired, are done on the same spindle 44, once the body 43 has been placed thereon, and there is no transfer of the can body 43 between spindles for completion of the operations thereon.

The initiation and completion of the operations of slitting, trimming, flanging and beading on the same spindle constitute an important feature of the invention.

Description of Drive for Head Stock Turret, Tail Stock Turret and Central Transfer Wheel Referring now particularly to FIGS. l, 2 and 3 of the drawings, the driving unit 34 for the head stock turret 38, the tail stock turret 41 and the central transfer wheel 39 includes a frame 47 mounted upon the base 32. The frame 47 supports a main driving motor 48 arranged to move on rails 49 supported at each end on spaced abutments 51 and 52, the abutments S1 and 52 resting upon a top member 53 of the frame 47. The motor 48 can be adjusted in its position by means of a hand wheel 54 turning in fixed bearing 56 resting on the abutment 51, hand wheel 54 being integral with a screw 57 cooperating with a nut 53 forming part of a mount for motor 48 and sliding upon the rails 49.

The speed of motor 43 is controlled by a centrifugal switch 50 having a pulley 55 driven by a belt 60 reeved about a pulley 65 on motor 48, excessive speed of motor 48 causing the switch 50 to open. l

Motor 48 turns a pulley 59, which in turn drives a pulley 61 through the medium of an endless belt 62 trained therebetween. Pulley 61 is fast on a shaft 63 supported in a bearing block 64 secured to the top frame member 53. The shaft 63 and the pulley 61 fast thereto afford a central driving point for all of the drive mechanism for theV apparatus according to the invention, and the shaft 63 has a belt sprocket 66 fast thereon which drives a timing belt 67 trained about a belt sprocket 68 fast on a counter shaft 69 journalled in a bearing support 71. The shaft 69 also is fast with a belt sprocket 72 cooperating with a timing belt 73 trained about a driven sprocket 74 fast upon an input shaft 76 of a speed reducer main drive 77, the drive 77 having an output shaft 78.

Proper tension can be maintained upon the belt 73 by rotating a housing 79 for the speed reducer main drive 77 about the output shaft 78, the housing 79 having an ear 31 extending therefrom which cooperates with a turn-buckle 82 anchored at S3 to an abutment S4 on the main support 32, see particularly FIG. 3. Adjustment of turn-buckle 82 will rock the housing 79 about the out put shaft 78, the tension in the timing belt 73 thereby being adjusted.

The output shaft 78 from the speed reducer main drive 77 is connected to the main drive shaft 36 by means of a key 86, see FIG. l. The shaft 36 turns in a bearing 87 held in a support S8 extending through an opening 89 in a vertical face plate 91 of the head stock 40. Bearing 87 is enclosed by a shaft seal held to the support 88 by cap screws 9d.

The opposite end of the drive shaft 36 is supported in the tail stock 48a, see also FIG. 7, which includes a standard 92 supported upon spaced guideways 93 resting on the base 32, see also FIG. l. Minor adjustments of the spacing of the tail stock 40a with respect to the head stock 40 can be made by an adjusting screw 94 threaded into a block 96 in the base of the standard 92 and turning in an abutment 98 at one end of the base 32, the position of the standard 92 being maintained by locking nuts 97 threaded to the screw 94 and bearing against the abutment 98, see again FIG. 1.

As seen in FIG. 7, the quill shaft 36 is supported at the tail stock standard 92, and is encircled by a hollow shaft 101 -turning with the shaft 36 in a bearing 102 supported in an annular ring 103 positioned in an opening 194 in the tail stock standard 92. A sealing ring 106 is held to the shaft 101 by means of a counter sunk scrcw 107, and the bearing 102 is also sealed on the other side thereof by means of a seal 103 held to the annular support 163 by cap screws 169.

The central transfer wheel 39 and the tail stock turret 41, see again FIG. 7, are all arranged to turn with the shaft 36, the central transfer wheel 39 consisting of a plate 111 supported upon a cylindrical spacer 112 supported on the quill shaft 36 which spaces the central transfer wheel 39 from the head stock turret 38, see also FIG. 2. The quill shaft 36 has a keyway 113 therein retaining a key 114 locking a hub flange 117 extending from the plate 111 to the shaft 36. A socket head screw 116 extends radially in the hub ange 117 and is tapped into the key 114 to maintain the key 114 in position in the keyway 113. The circular plate 111 is held to the hub flange 117 by means of cap screws 118 tapped into hub 117.

The hub 117 of the central transfer wheel 39 is welded to a circular flange 119 which engages a ange 121 welded to the inner end of a hub 122 for the tail stock turret 41, the two flanges 119 and 121 being held together by bolts 123. The tail stock turret 41 comprises a pair of annular plates 124 and 126, which are spaced along the hub 122, the two plates 124 and 126 being Welded respectively at 127 and 123 to the hub 122. The annular plates 12.4 and 126 support equiangularly spaced bearing sleeves 129 at the periphery thereof, each sleeve 129 guiding a pusher mandrel 45.

In the embodiment herein shown, the tail stock turret has six pusher mandrels, but it is within the scope of the invention to provide a turret having more or less pusher mandrels thereon for placing a can body on a work spindle and in such an event the transfer wheel 39 and the head stock turret 38 would be revised accordingly.

Referring still to FIG. 7, the hollow shaft 101 surrounding the quill shaft 36 and journalled at the bearing 102 in the tail stock standard 92 is held to the annular plate 126 by means of a flange 130 welded at 131 to the inner end of the hollow shaft 131, the flange 130 being held to the plate 126 by bolts 132.

The central transfer wheel 39 supports equiangularly spaced pockets 133 at the periphery thereof, each pocket 133 being essentially semi-circular in cross section and being adapted to receive the can body 43 shown in dotted outline. The pockets 133 are made from ber material so as not to scratch or otherwise mar the surface of the can 43. The number of pockets is equal to the number of pusher mandrels 45, and each pocket 133 is aligned with a pusher mandrel 45.

The individual can body 43 is moved from the can receiving pocket 133, see FIG 7, by means of the pusher mandrel 45 which includes a longitudinal member 134 guided in a bushing 136 supported within the sleeve 129 of the tail stock turret 41, the members 134 being additionally guided at times in half sleeves 137 having a flange 138 held to the annular plate 126 as by cap screws 139. Each pusher mandrel 134 has a can engaging end member 135 which is freely rotatable upon the member 134 and thus adapted to rotate with the can a-s it is mounted on the rotating work spindle 44.

As will be described, structure is provided for removing individual partly completed can bodies 43 from the magazine 42 and placing the individual can body 43 in the several pockets 133 disposed on the central transfer wheel 39. Such structure includes mechanism for eiecting the transfer of an individual can body 43 from the magazine 42 and for removing a can body which has had the operations of trimming, hanging and beading completed thereon.

Details of Feed Mechanism Referring now to FIGS. l, 4, and 6 of the drawings, the magazine 42 includes a base 141 which is `guided between gibs 142 secured to the top of the main frame 32. The magazine 42 is maintained in proper spaced relationship with respect to Ithe tail stock standard 92 by means of a rod 143, see FIG. l, secured at one end to -the tail stock standard 92 and to an abutment 144, see also FIG. 5, extending upward from the base 141, the adjustment of the magazine 42 with respect to the rod 143 andthe tailstock standard 92 being achieved by lock nuts 146 threaded to the end of the rod 143 and flanking the abutment 144.

The magazine 42 consists also of a standard 147 having a channel shaped cross section and extending upward from the -base 141, see particularly FIG. 4. The standard 147 has a plate 14S welded to the edges of the anges of the standard 147, see particularly FIGS. 5 and 6, and a pair of support arms 149 and 151 are Welded to the support plate 148 to support end guides 152 and 156 for the can bodies 43. End guide 152 has a cross section in the form of an angle, and cap screws 153 and 154 extend through a base of the angle and are threaded into the support arms 149 and 151 to hold the end guide 152 in place. p

End guide 156 also has an angle shaped crosssection, and is adjusted in position on the arms 149 and 151. Guide 156 has a base 157 bearing against arms 149 and 151, and bolts 158 and 159 extend through slots 161 and 162 to hold the guide 156 in position.

The movable end guide 156 also supports a-front guide rod 163 for the can bodies 43, see particularly FIG. 6, the guide rod 163 being supported on brackets 164 which are adjusted in position with respect to the guide 156 by bolts 166, according to the diameter of the can body 43. The fixed end guide 152 likewise supports a guide rod 167 which is secured to brackets 168 adjustably held Details of Can Feeding and Delivery Mechanism The guides 152 and 156 and the forward guides 163 and 167 and the rear guides 171 define a vertical chute for the movement of the can body 43 Ito can feeding mechanism as will now be described. The bottommost can body is adapted to be removed from the magazine 42 by a can feeding wheel 172, having equiangularly spaced pockets 173 therein to receive a can body 43. As seen in FIGS. 4 and 6, the feeding wheel 172 rotates in a clockwise direction, and includes a pair of spaced discs 174 and 176, each having the aforesaid pockets 173 therein, which are aligned with each other. The discs 174 and 176 have hubs 177 and 178 respectively which are fast on a drive shaft 179 supported in a pillow block 181 mounted on the frame member 147, see also FIG. 5.

As the can body 43 is picked up at a pocket 173 of the can feeding wheel 172, it is guided between the can feeding wheel 172 and a circular chute 182 spaced from the periphery of the can feeding wheel 172, as seenin FIG. 5. Circular chute 182 has lugs 185 for mounting the same to the standard 147.

As the can feeding wheel 172 moves in a clockwise direction, it will transfer a can body 43 from the pocket 173 to the pocket 133 of the central transfer wheel 39, see also FIGS. 1, 2 and 7, the central transfer wheel 39 being indicated in dotted outline in FIG. 4. y

Structure is provided for stripping the can body '43 from the can feeding wheel 172 on to the central transfer wheel 39 when a pocket 173 of the can feeding wheel 172 is indexed with a pocket 133 of the central transfer wheel 39. Such structure includes, see also FiGS. 5 and 6, an idler belt 183 reeved between a pair of idler pulleys 184 and 186 supported upon an extension 187 from the standard 147, see also FIG. 4. The idler belt 183 merely contacts the periphery of the can body 43 to insure that it leaves the pocket 173 of the can feeding wheel 172 and is transferred to the pocket 133 of the central transfer Wheel 39.

As will be described in more detail as this specification proceeds, the individual can bodies 43 which have been transferred from the can feeding wheel 172 to the central transfer wheel 39 will be removed from. central transfer wheel 39 by the pusher mandrels 45 seen particularly in FIG. 7, and inserted on a work spindle 44 of the head stock turret 38 seen particularly in FIG. 14, the can body 43 being completely processed on such work spindle. The completed can body is removed from such spindle by the pusher mandrels y45 seen in FIG. 7, and placed once more upon the central transfer wheel 39, the trimmed, anged and beaded (if desired) can body 43 then being transferred from such central transfer wheel 39 to a delivery wheel 188, see again FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, having equiangularly spaced pockets 199 therein.

As with the can feeding wheel 172., the delivery wheel 188 includes a pair `of discs 189 and 191A respectively mounted on hubs 192 and 193 fast upon a shaft 194 turning in a pillow block 196 secured to the channel shaped standards 147.

It may be noted that both the loading wheel 172 and delivery wheel 188 are arranged t-o be adjusted with respect to the hubs upon which they are supported, so that the wheels 172 and 188 can be properly indexed with respect to the central transfer wheel 39. To this end, and referring particularly to disc 176 which is typical of the discs 174, 176, 189 and 191, such disc includes a plurality of arcuate slots 197 equiangularly disposed thereon which slots cooperate with cap screws 198 tapped into the hub 178 upon which the same is mounted.

It may be noted that the central transfer wheel 39 is arranged with six pockets 133 therein, while the wheels 172 and 188 each have three pockets therein. The diameter of the central transfer wheel 39 is twice the diameter of the transfer wheels 172 and 188, and in order to` provide transfer between the wheels 172 and 188 and the central transfer wheel 39, wheels 172 and 188 must turn at an angular speed which is twice the angular speed of the central transfer wheel 39. Referring again to FIG. 3 of the drawings, the main output shaft 78k from the speed reducer main drive 77 has a sprocket 199 thereon which drives a sprocket 201 by means of a sprocket chain 292 being trained therebetween. An idler slack take-up sprocket 203 is provided between sprockets 199 and 261 and turns freely on an idler shaft 284 mounted on the adjustable support 296 adjustably secured in any convenient fashion to the head stock frame 47.

Sprocket 291 is fast upon a shaft 207, see again FIG. 3, journalled in a pillow block 2158 secured on the back of the frame 47, and the shaft 2117 is journalled adjacent the magazine 42 in a bearing 209, see FIG. 6. A sprocket 211 is fast on the shaft 207 and meshes with an endless sprocket chain 212 reeved about a pulley 213 fast on the shaft 179 turning the can feeding wheel 172, and about a pulley 214 fast on the shaft 184 turning the delivery wheel 188. An idler sprocket 216 is mounted on an idler Shaft 217 supported in a bracket 218 which is adjusted in position with respect to a base plate 219 welded or otherwise secured to the standard 147, cap screws 221 and slots 222 in the bracket 218 being provided for adjusting the position of the idler sprocket 216 so as to take up the slack in the chain 212, see FIG. 5.

The completed can body 43 which has been transferred from the central transfer wheel 39 to the delivery wheel 188 is moved thereby to a delivery chute 223 seen in FIGS. and 6. Delivery chute 223 includes la guide 224 spaced from the delivery wheel 188, guide 224 having an arcuate ange 226 held to a block 225 on the standard 147, by means of bolts 227 and nuts 22S. The width of the chute 223 is adjusted by an angle shaped member 229 having a leg 231 which is adjusted in position with respect to the guide 224 by means of bolts 2132. The chute 223 also has a central guiding finger 233 held yby a mounting bolt 234 to the guide 224, the nger 233 also having a curved configuration generally corresponding to the guide 224. Each of the side Walls of the delivery chute 223 include curved guide lingers 235 which guide the ends of the finished can body 43, see particularly FIG. 6. A linger 235a extending between the disks 189 and 191 serves to strip the body 43 from the pocket 190.

Details of Can Body Transfer Mechanism As has previously been described, the work spindle 44 on the head stock turret `38 and the pusher rods or mandrels 45 on tail stock turret 41 revolve with the central transfer wheel 39 on the quill shaft 36. The central transfer wheel 39 is arranged to hold a can -body in the pocket 133 thereon, and the pusher mandrel 45 of the tail stock turret 41 is arranged to move the can body 43 from the central transfer wheel 39 to a rotating work spindle 44, the aforesaid feeding operation by the feeding wheel 172 to the central transfer wheel 39 being in continuous fashion, and the pusher mandrel 45 of the tail stock turret 41 effecting a transfer from the pocket 133 of the central transfer wheel 39 to an empty work spindle 44. It should be kept in mind that once a can body 43 has been moved on to the spindle 44 at a loading point, the operations of trimming, flanging and beading of such can body are completed on such spindle while the spindle revolves from a loading point to an unloading point, and that once those operations are completed the pusher mandrels 45 remove the completed can body from the spindle 44 to the central transfer wheel 39. The completed can body is picked up from the central transfer Wheel 39 by delivery wheel 18S and removed from the machine at the delievry chute 223.

Structure is provided for moving the can body 43 from the central transfer wheel 39 on to the spindle 44. With particular reference to FIGS. 1, 2, 7, 30 and 31 of the drawings, the structure for moving the pusher mandrel 45 longitudinally of the central transfer wheel 39 includes a barrel shaped cam 236 mounted on the tail stock 40a, see particularly FIGS. 7 and 30. The tail stock 40a. has a circular flange 237 welded thereto, the ange 237 and the tail stock 40a being held to the tail stock standard 92 by means of cap screws 238 tapped 8 into aligning bosses 239 extending from the tail stock standard 92.

The tail stock cam 236 is xedly held to the interior of the tail stock 40a by means of cap screws 242, and the cam 236 has a groove 241 which guides a cam follower 244 supported at and secured to one end of the member 134 of the pusher mandrel 45, see also FIG. 2l. The contour of the groove 244 is best shown with respect to FIGS. 30 and 31, and the movement of the pusher mandrel 45 is in accordance with the prole seen in FIG. 31. as will -be described.

Description of Head Stock Turret and Spindle Driving Mechanism The head stock turret 3S supporting the work spindle 44, see FIGS. 1, 2 and 14, comprises a hub 245 which is keyed to the main drive quill shaft 36 by means of a key 246. A pair of circular plates 247 and 248 are spaced along the hub 245 and are welded thereto as shown, the circular plates 247 and 248 supporting equiangularly spaced sleeves 249 in which spindles 44 are journalled, each such spindle being aligned with a pocket 133 on the central transfer wheel 39 and a mandrel 45 of the tail stock turret 41.

Structure is provided for driving the work spindles 44 seen in FIG. 14 rotatably while they revolve with the head stock turret 38 seen in FIGS. 1 and 14, each such rotating work spindle 44 cooperating with cams and cam operated tools which perform the operation of trimming, anging and beading a can body 43 while it is on the spindle 44, which cams and tools will be described in further detail as this specication proceeds. Referring now to FIGS. l, 3 and 8 to 13 inclusive, the structuer for driving the work spindle 44 includes a pulley 251m, see particularly FIG. 3, having a -belt 250 trained therearound which drives a pulley 255 fast on an input shaft 269 of a speed reducing mechanism 251 having an output shaft 252. The speed reducer 251 includes a housing 253 supported on the vertical face plate 91 and rotatable about the output shaft 252, and the tension in the belt 250 can be adjusted by means of an ear 254 extending from the housing 253 and connected to a turn buckle 256 having an abutment at 257 to the base 32.

The output .shaft 252 from the speed reducer 251 is housed within a sleeve 258, see also FIGS. 1, 8 and 10, and the shaft 252 has a pulley 259 fast thereon driving an endless belt 261 shown schematically in FIG. 8. Endless belt 261 is for the purpose of driving the work spindles 44 indicated generally in FIG. 8.

The endless belt 261 is reeved as seen in FIG. 8, to effect driving of the work spindles 44 seen in FIG. 14. The endless belt 261 is thus reeved, considering the driving pulley 259 as a starting point, about a irst idler pulley 262 mounted on the vertical face plate 91, see also FIG. 9, a second idler pulley 263 also being mounted on the face plate 91, see FIG. 11. The endless belt 261 extends from the idler pulley 263 and about an idler pulley 264 and thence seriatim about a series of driving pulleys 266,

see `FIG. 14, one for each typical work spindle 44. After thus contacting the several driving pulleys 266, the endless 4belt 261 is reeved about an idler 267, see again FIG. 11, and thence about an idler 268, see FIG. 9, and back to the beginning at the driving pulley 259.

Each of the work spindles 44 moves orbitally with the head stock turret 38 and with the quill shaft 36 as a center, and the spindles are accordingly given rotative motion by the combination of the movement of the endlessbelt 261 and the orbital movement of the spindles with the quill shaft 36 seen in FIG. I4.

Structure is provided for insuring the provision of driving effort to the pulley 266 for each spindle 44 as it moves out of contact with the endless belt 261 adjacent the point where it is reeved about the idler pulley 267 and where the spindle 44 moves again into contact with the endless belt 261 adjacent the idler 264. Such structure comprises an endless belt 269 which is reeved

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3130698 *Sep 25, 1961Apr 28, 1964Coors Porcelain CoRotary can domer and trimmer
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US6105341 *Nov 20, 1998Aug 22, 2000Abc Seamer Technologies, Inc.Process that uses liquid nitrogen for displacing air from a container prior to seaming a lid to the container
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WO1999032243A1 *Dec 22, 1998Jul 1, 1999Abc Lid Machine Co IncContainer seaming apparatus and methods
WO2012054592A1 *Oct 19, 2011Apr 26, 20123M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod and apparatus for making aerosol cans for metered dose inhaler
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/324, 72/421, 72/372, 413/27, 72/368, 72/715, 413/52
International ClassificationB21D51/26
Cooperative ClassificationY10S72/715, B21D51/263, B21D51/2615, B21D51/2638
European ClassificationB21D51/26B3, B21D51/26B4, B21D51/26B