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Publication numberUS3035299 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1962
Filing dateDec 3, 1959
Priority dateDec 3, 1959
Publication numberUS 3035299 A, US 3035299A, US-A-3035299, US3035299 A, US3035299A
InventorsGordon William J J, Lincoln John W, Sperry Charles R
Original AssigneeJohnson & Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispenser
US 3035299 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 22, 1962 w. J. J. GORDON ETAL 3, 3

DISPENSER Filed Dec. 3, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEY May 22, 1962 w. J. J. GORDON ETAL 3,035,299

DISPENSER Filed Dec. 3, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 gwzzx ATTORN.EY

- B 15.5 AUP m 3,35,29 Patented May 22, 1%62 sey Filed Dec. 3, 1959, Ser. No. 857,162 11 Claims. (Cl. 15--537) The present invention relates to dispensers for nongaseous fluids, more particularly to hand dispenser containers for sticky and messy liquids incorporating an appiicator which should be covered when not in use.

Dispenser container units of this general type for liquids, such as mucilage, nail polish, fluid shoe polish, and the like, have been in the form of a container, such as a small jar, with a screw cap having a brush or a similar applicator depending from the the cap. When not in use, the applicator is enclosed in the jar and immersed in the liquid. In use, the cap is unscrewed and the applicator, when is saturated with the liquid, is removed from the jar. In order to apply only the amount of liquid desired, it is necessary to in some way wipe off the applicator or remove a good proportion of the liquid which it contains. This normally results in some of the liquid running down the outside of the jar and the formation of deposits from the liquid around its mouth. This leads to increased messiness and other difilculties in operation. In addition, liquids, such as mucilage, nail polish, and the like, harden to such an extent that it is extremely difiicult to open the jar due to the hardening of the deposits formed around its mouth.

Metering-type dispenser containers have been proposed wherein an applicator is connected to a liquid reservoir through a metering device, such as a valve, which only allows liquid to reach the applicator when the applicator, itself, or some other part of the dispenser is actuated for this purpose. These dispensers have never been used to any great extent since a separate cap or cover such as a screwtype closure is needed to enclose the applicator which otherwise would be exposed at the end of the dispenser and the dispensers, themselves, have been intricate in design and, therefore, prohibitively expensive.

Both the conventional jar and the metering-type dispenser containers described above require two hands to operate. This is inconvenient, particularly when the liquid is one which hardens very rapidly. For mucilage and nail polish, for instance, it is necessary to replace the cap after each application. Obviously, for the conventional jar-type dispenser, it also is necessary to wipe the applicator on the mouth of the jar before each use. If the cap is not replaced after each use, not only will the liquid in the container be affected in the case of the jar-type dispenser, but also the liquid will harden on the applicator and make it unsuitable for use. This is particularly disadvantageous if the applicator is a brush. There are many operations wherein it is highly desirable to have a dispenser which may be held and operated with only one hand and which therefore does not require the repeated removal and application of a cap to cover the applicator. For instance, it is obvious such a dispenser would be highly desirable in the application of nail polish and mucilage.

The present invention contemplates a dispenser for nongaseous fluids, such as nail polish, mucilage, fluid shoe polish, paint, marking [fluids and the like, which may be held and operated in onehand. A retractable applicator is provided which has a retracted and an extended position in the dispenser. In its retracted position, the applicator is completely covered and the liquid contents of the dispenser are sealed off from the atmosphere. The

applicator may be uncovered and extended for use merely by moving certain parts of the dispenser relative to one another. This may be accomplished, for example, by a squeezing or pressing motion of the hand holding the dispenser. Releasable stop means then is provided to hold the applicator in its extended position, and the applicator may be returned to its retracted position and automatically covered merely by releasing the stop means with the hand holding the dispenser.

A portion of the dispenser at the applicator end which covers the applicator in the retracted position of the applicator is drivably associated with the applicator and adapted to open and move out of the way of the applicator as the applicator is moved from its retracted to its extended position. The applicator and the end portion are biased to return to their closed positions so that when the stop means is released the applicator is automatically retracted and covered.

Metering is accomplished by mounting the applicator in the end of an elongated reservoir, or in an extension provided for this purpose at the applicator end of the reservoir, in such a way that pressure upon the applicator of the type which may be exerted by pressing the tip of the applicator against the surface to which liquid is to be applied will unseat a resiliently mounted valve connected to the applicator and allow a small quantity of fluid to pass from the reservoir to the applicator. The amount of fluid reaching the applicator may be controlled by the extent to which pressure is applied to the end of the applicator.

Thus, a one-hand operable dispenser is provided which avoids the difficulties and disadvantages of prior art dispensers for this general purpose. The dispenser may be operated easily by the hand holding the dispenser any number of times at spaced intervals or in repeated succession Without any of the messiness associated with conventional dispensers for liquids, such as mucilage, nail polish, shoe polish, and the like. The applicator, which may be in the form of a brush, is automatically covered when in its retracted position and kept moist and immediately ready for use at any time; and the supply of liquid is sealed off form the atmosphere at all times except when the applicator is operated to meter out a small quantity of fluid.

According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, extremely simple and effective means is provided for covering the applicator and returning it to its retracted position. A fitting is provided at the applicator end of the dispenser which comprises a resilient tube of flexible material around the applicator and closure portions extending inwardly of the tube to contact one another and close oi? the tube beyond the tip of the applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position. The inner end of the tube is adapted to move outwardly with the applicator as the applicator is moved from its retracted to its extended position; and the tube inverts, or turns inside out, at a point spaced inwardly from the position which the tip of the applicator assumes in the extended position of the applicator. The aforesaid motion of the tube serves to open the closure portions and move them out of the way of the applicator so that the tip of the applicator in its extended position is exposed out of contact with all other portions of the dispenser and the applicator is ready for use. When the tube inverts, it distends and increases in diameter. Since it is resilient, it tends to return to its original noninverted condition in which it has a smaller diameter. This tendency of the tube to assume its original diameter acts to return the applicator to its retracted position and cover it with the closure portions. Thus, when the stop means is released, the applicator is returned automatically to its retracted position and is automatically covered.

An additional important feature of a preferred em- -sides of the applicator in its retracted position.

bodiinent of this invention lies in the provision of a resilient sphincter ring extending radially inwardly of the above-described tube adjacent the tip of and gripping the The sphincter ring squeezes the tip of the applicator and grips it tightly all around the sides of the applicator adjacent the tip with the result that air trapped between the closure portions and the ring can contact the applicator only at the very tip of the applicator outside the ring. This is particularly important if the above-described closure portions extending inwardly of the tube beyond the tip of the applicator do not fit tightly enough together to completely prevent the circulation of air. When the applicator moves from its retracted to its extended position, the sphincter ring distends and moves from the inside to the outside of the tube as it passes around the point of inversion of the tube. It also is distended in this operation and tends to return to its smallest diameter unless prevented. Thus, the sphincter ring also tends to return to its smaller original diameter unless prevented and cooperates with the tube in returning the applicator to its retracted position.

Other and further advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and claims taken together with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of a dispenser according to one embodiment of this invention showing the applicator brush in its extended position;

FIG. 2 is a view in perspective of the dispenser of FIG. 1 showing the applicator retracted;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged end view of the dispenser of FIG. 1 with the applicator extended;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged broken schematic view partly in elevation and partly in section showing the dispenser of FIG. 1 with its parts arranged as they occur in the retracted position of the applicator;

FIG. 5 is a similar enlarged broken schematicview of only some of the parts of the dispenser shown in FIG. 4 a short time after the applicator beings its motion from its retracted to its extended position;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 with the applicator moved further towards its extended position;

FIG. 7 is another view similar to FIG. 5 but wherein the applicator has reached its extended position;

FIG. 8 is a schematic view partly in elevation and partly in section of the applicator portion of a dispenser according to another embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 9 is a broken view in elevation of the applicator end of a dispenser according to still another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a partially cutaway view of the dispenser of FIG. 9 partly in elevation and partly in section showing the stop provided in the walls of the dispenser for holding the edges of the closure portions in close contact with one another;

FIG. 11 is a schematic view partly in section and partly in elevation of the applicator end of a dispenser according to another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a schematic sectional view taken along the line 1212 of FIG. 11; and

FIG. 13 is a schematic view partly in elevation and partly in section of a still difierent embodiment of the invention.

Referring to FIGS. 1-7, there is shown a dispenser according to one embodiment of this invention which comprises a cylindrical outer sleeve 15, a cylindrical hollow reservoir 16 mounted for slideable movement in the sleeve axially, or lengthwise, of the sleeve, a cylindrical extension 17 of smaller diameter fitted in one end of the reservoir, liquid 18 in the reservoir and an applicator brush 19 mounted in one end of the extension. The reservoir 16 is in the form of a tube with one end closed and the other open to receive the extension 17. The extension comprises a hollow rear cylindrical portion 21 which fits tightly into the end of the reservoir and normally holds the extension in position in the reservoir, a somewhat heavier flange portion 22 which extends out to the sides of the reservoir and a slightly longer front cylindrical portion 23, somewhat smaller in diameter, extending in the opposite direction away from the reservoir. The applicator brush 19 fits in the front cylindrical portion 23 and is adapted to slide back and forth therein. The applicator brush has a base 24 which is mounted at the end of a short rod 25 connected to a valve 26 which in turn is in the form of a truncated cone. The unit formed by the applicator 19, the rod 25 and the valve 26 is resiliently mounted at the end of a curved spring 27 which, in turn, is fixed in position with respect to the reservoir 16 and the extension 17. One end of the spring 27 is tucked between the reservoir 16 and the rear cylindrical portion 21 of the extension and held there by the tight fit between them. The valve 26 normally is pressed downward, in FIGS. 4-7, by the spring and seated on the inner circular edge 28 of the ledge presented by the inner end of the front cylindrical portion 23 of the extension. In this position of the valve 26, the liquid 18 in the reservoir is sealed off from the atmosphere and prevented from reaching the brush. To lift the valve 26, it only is necessary to press the dispenser downwardly against some object, as shown in FIG. 7, with sufficient force to move the brush 19 upward slightly in the extension against the resistance of the spring 27 as indicated by the arrow. The strength of the spring 27 preferably is adjusted or selected so that a mere wiping motion with the applicator brush does not cause the valve to lift. However, there is a small quantity of liquid available to the brush in the front portion 23 of the extension just after the valve 26 closes. This liquid is prevented from running down the sides of the brush by an annular flange 29 which extends inwardly from the mouth of the front portion 23 of the extension and contacts the brush 19 all around its sides. The liquid stored in the front portion 23 of the extension is available to be drawn through the brush during use. When the liquid carried by the brush and stored in the front portion of the extension is used up, it again becomes necessary to lift the valve to allow liquid to pass from the reservoir to the brush.

The front end of the outer sleeve 15 is relieved to provide an annular groove 31 and a tip portion 32 of smaller diameter between the groove 31 and the end of the sleeve for attachment to a fitting 33 connecting the sleeve to the front end of the extension. 'The fitting 33 comprises a resilient tube 34 of flexible material positioned around the applicator and pie-shaped closure portions 35 extending inwardly of the tube to contact one another along their edges and close off the tube beyond the tip 36 of the applicator 19 when the applicator is in its retracted position as shown in FiGS. 2 and 4. The inner end of the tube 34 fits tightly around the outer surface of the front portion 23 of the extension and normally grips it tightly to hold the tube on the extension so that the inner end of the tube is drivably connected to the extension 17 and, through the spring and valve arrangement described, to the applicator 19, itself. Thus, the applicator 19 is drivably associated and, in fact, connected, through the tube 34, with the closure portions 35 which normally cover the applicator in its retracted position.

The tube 34 is connected to the sleeve through a disklike skirt 37 extending radially outwardly from the pieshaped closure portions 35. The skirt, in turn, has a cylindrical base 38 which fits over the portion 32 of smaller diameter at the front end of the sleeve. The base 38 has an inwardly extending annular flange 39 at its rear end which fits into the annular recess 31 in the sleeve and positively locks the fitting in place on the sleeve.

A resilient sphincter ring 41 in the form of an annular flange extends radially inwardly from the inside wall of the tube 34 adjacent the tip 36 of and gripping the sides of the applicator 19 in its retracted position. The sphincter ring 41 squeezes the tip 36 of the applicator 19 and grips it tightly all around the sides of the applicator adjacent the tip with the result that air trapped between the closure portions 35 and the ring 41 can contact the applicator only at the very tip of the applicator outside the ring.

The applicator 19 is moved from its retracted to its extended position merely by sliding the reservoir 16 axially forward with respect to the outer sleeve 15 until the applicator is fully uncovered and in its extended position shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 7. This may be accomplished merely by pressing on the rear end of the reservoir with the thumb or a finger of the hand holding the dispenser. Of course, the extension 17 at the front end of the reservoir 16 moves forward and outward with the reservoir; and the rear end of the resilient tube 34 moves forward with the extension. Since the reservoir 16, and the inner end of the tube 34 for the reasons described above, moves forward, or outward, with respect to the outer sleeve 15, the inner end of the tube 34 moves forward, or outward, with respect to the base 38 of the skirt portion 37 of the fitting 33. As this motion continues, the curved, or inclined, mouth 42 of the tube which connects the tube to the outer edges of the pie-shaped closure portions 35 presses the closure portions outwardly, downwardly in FIG. 5, in such a way that they begin to swing about the outer edge of the skirt 37 where the skirt is connected to its base 38 as shown in FIG. 5. This swinging open of the closure portions continues almost until the applicator reaches its extended position shown in FIG. 7. At about the time the closure portions 35 assume a position approximately parallel to the path of the applicator 19, the tube 34 begins to invert :or turn inside out as shown in FIG. 6. Up until this time, the resilient sphincter ring 41 has continued to squeeze and grip the tip of the applicator. As this motion continues, the sphincter ring 41, itself, moves around the point of inversion of the tube until it faces outwardly as shown in FIG. 7. The forward mot-ion of the reservoir 16 and the applicator 19 continues until the tube 34 is fully inverted and the applicator 19 is fully extended. This occurs in about the position shown in FIG. 7 where the tube is turned back until the front end 43 of the front portion 23 of the extension begins to show on the outside of the dispenser around the applicator 19. it is obvious from FIGS. 6 and 7 that as the tube 34 and the resilient sphincter ring 41 inveit they also distend and increase in diameter. Due to their resiliency, they tend to return to their original smaller diameter and, unless rmtrained, will return the applicator to its retracted position and assume the shapes shown for these parts in FIG. 4. Even though the resiliency of the tube 34 and/ or the sphincter ring 41, themselves, normally will return the applicator to its retracted position in this manner, it may be desirable in some cases to include an additional spring, not shown, normally urging the reservoir, or another part holding the applicator, to the retracted position of the applicator. This preloads the tube 34 so that it reacts quickly to return the applicator. Such a spring also may be useful in connection with the version of FIGS. 9 and to help pull the closure portions 35 into the positions shown for them in FIG. 10 in which their adjacent edges are in compressive contact.

To avoid the necessity of holding the applicator 19 in its extended posit-ion by continuing to press upon the rear end of the reservoir 16, a latch is provided in the side of the dispenser for automatically holding the applicator in its extended position. This latch comprises a curved leaf spring 45 positioned in a longitudinal groove 46 exposed to the inside of the outer sleeve 15. The spring has an upturned rear end 47 and a straight front end 48, both of which normally bear upon, or ride in contact with, the outside of the reservoir 16. The top 49 of the curved portion of the spring normally is in contact with the top of the slot 46. A button 51 connected to the top of the curved portion of the spring protrudes through a hole 52 in the outer sleeve 15 to the extent that a portion of the length of the button 51 is exposed to the outside of the dispenser. The shape of the spring 45 is selected with respect to the depth of the slot 46 so that its ends normally press downwardly upon the outside reservoir. An annular recess 53 on the outside of the reservoir 16 is positioned along the length of the reservoir so that it comes under the forward end 48 of the spring just as the applicator 19 reaches its extended position. The front end 48 drops into the recess 53 and acts as a detent which prevents return movement of the reservoir 16 and its associated parts including the applicator 19. The rear end 47 of the spring is so shaped that when the annular recess 53 passes under it the tip of this end of the spring remains above the rear shoulder of the recess so that the spring does not interfere with the forward motion of the reservoir. When it is desired to release the spring detent, it only is necessary to press upon the button 51 with the hand holding the dispenser. This presses the center of the spring down and lifts its ends up, thereby lifting the forward end 48 of the spring out of the annular recess 53 and allowing the reservoir and associated parts to return to their original positions.

The outer sleeve 15, the reservoir 16 and the extension 17 at the end of the reservoir may be made of any suitable rigid and durable material which is relatively inexpensive and which will be resistant to the liquid to be dispensed. Certain plastic materials, such as polystyrene, polyethylene, and the like, are believed to be particularly suitable for this purpose. It is desirable that whatever naterial is used possess a certain amount of inherent slipperiness or lubricity so that the parts may move freely with respect to one another without extra lubrication. In the same way, the base 24 of the applicator brush 19, the rod 25, the valve 26 and the curved spring 27 to which they are connected all should be materials which are inexpensive, durable, and resistant to the materials to be dispensed. Similar plastic materials may be employed. For instance, the curved spring 27 may be in the form of a leaf of plastic material. The fitting 33 may be formed from an elastic and resilient material such as natural or synthetic rubber. Again, the material selected must be one which is resistant to the fluid to be dispensed; and, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 in particular, it must possess sufficient body, or rigidity, so that the tube resists compression, as the sleeve moves toward the extended position of the applicator 19, and opens the closure portions 35 and inverts, as described above. The ability of the tube to act in this manner is a function of the thickness of the tube as well as its material, and both factors must be taken into account in designing a dispenser according to this invention for a particular use.

The applicator 19, itself, may be in the form of a brush of the type shown, made up of conventional bristles or synthetic filaments or the like. The brush must have sufficient rigidity to lift the valve 26 as described above when the tip of the applicator in its extended position is pressed against an object or work surface. The brush also must be capable of drawing liquid from the extension 17 through the portion attached to its base 24 to the tip 36 of the brush in use. An entirely different type of applicator may be used. For instance, it may be a fluted plastic applicator, not shown. In certain applications, it may be desirable to use the fitting 33 and associated parts with an applicator arrangement which does not need the resilient sphincter ring 41 described above, in which case the applicator may be of almost any shape so long as it can be retracted inside the tube and covered by the closure portions 35 in its retracted position.

FIG. 8 discloses a dispenser wherein there is a somewhat difierent relationship between the applicator brush 1% and the front portion 23 of the extension. This portion of the extension is considerably shorter; the inner end of the brush is connected directly to the valve 26; and the brush, itself, has sufficient bulk to fill up the extension below the inner end of the brush. In this embodiment of the invention, the flange portion 29 at the mouth of the extension is quite shallow. The result of this arrangement is that the front end 23 of the extension below the valve 26 is substantially occupied by the brush 19, itself, when the valve is seated; and when the valve is lifted up by pressure on the tip 36 of the brush, it is even more completely occupied by the brush. This means that the brush 19 only receives any substantial amount of liquid from the reservoir 16 when pressure is applied to the tip of the brush. This arrangement may be advantageous with certain liquids wherein it is desirable to maintain the brush and the inside of the tube inwardly of the sphincter ring 41 comparatively dry. The arrangement shown in FIGS. 4-7 is particularly advantageous when it is desired to keep the brush relatively wet inwardly of the sphincter ring.

FIGS. 9 and 10 show another feature of the invention. It normally is desirable that the pie-shaped closure portions 35 at the front end of the dispenser remain in contact with one another all along their adjacent edges in the retracted position of the applicator so that the tip of the applicator is completely enclosed and prevented from coming into contact with the outside atmosphere. Since it is conceivable that under some circumstances it may be difficult to shape or cut the closure portions with sufficient exactness to insure that there is a close fit between their edges, means is provided for drawing them closer together. As shown in FIG. 9, the fitting at the front end of the applicator is shaped so that the closure portions 35 and the skirt 37 to which they connect are curved slightly so that the end of the fitting is convex when the edges of the closure portions first come into contact with one another in their normal relaxed positions. The protruding rear end of the reservoir 16, not shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, then is pulled further rearwardly until an annular recess 55 adjacent the front end of the reservoir 16 comes in line with rear end 56 of a spring detent 57 similar to the one described in connection with FIG. 4. However, both ends of this spring are designed to catch on one of the shoulders of the recess. This detent then acts to hold the reservoir 16 in its new rearward position. When the reservoir is moved into this position, it pulls the tube 34 with it; and the tube swings the closure portions 35 inwardly of the dispenser so that their adjacent edges come into compressive contact with one another and form an even tighter seal between them as shown in FIG. 10. The detent 57 may be released merely by pressing upon a button 58 secured thereto as described in connection with the embodiment of FIGS. 17.

In FIGS. 11 and 12, there is shown a dispenser according to an embodiment of this invention which is similar in almost every respect to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-7 with the major exceptions that closure portions 35a at the mouth of the tube 34 extend from the tip of the dispenser almost to the tip of the applicator 19 in its retracted position and there is no resilient sphincter ring 41. The closure portions and the tube 34 are integral and may be formed by casting the fitting solid and then cutting slits, as shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, to form the closure portions 35a which appear pie-shaped in FIG. 12 and as halves of a truncated pyramid in FIG. 11. In other respects, this dispenser operates very similarly to that of FIGS. 17. Due to the depth of the closure portions, it may in some applications ofier increased sealing area for protecting the tip of applicator 19.

In FIG. 13 there is shown a dispenser according to still a diiferent embodiment of this invention which comprises a cylindrical hollow shell 59, a curved diaphragm 61 at one end, and an inverting tube diaphragm 62 at the other end. An applicator shaft 63 connects the two diaphragms, and a brush-type applicator 64 is connected to the end of the shaft 63 by a rod 65 which supports the brush 64 from its base 66. The curved diaphragm 61 at the rear of the dispenser normally is convex or dished outwardly from the dispenser. It has an inwardly extending flange 67 around its edge which is adapted to fit into a corresponding recess 68 at the rear end of the dispenser to hold the diaphragm 61 on the shell 59, and a centrally located inwardly extending recessed boss 69 which is adapted to receive an annular flange 71 at the rear end of the shaft 63. The boss 69 is correspondingly recessed to grip the flange 71 so that motion of the shaft 63 axially of the shell 59 moves the diaphragm 61 inwardly and outwardly from a convex to a concave position, as shown in phantom in FIG. 13, and vice versa. The diaphragm 62 at the front of the dispenser comprises a tube 72 around the brush 64 and a more or less disk-shaped skirt 73 which extends radially outwardly from the tube to the shell 59 and has a cylindrical base portion 74 which is flanged to fit into an annular recess 75 at that end of the shell. The inner end of the tube 72 has an inwardly extending flange 76 which fits into an annular recess in the shaft 63 so that the tube moves with the shaft. Approximately where the tube 72 joins the skirt 73 in the retracted position of the applicator brush 64, the tube 72 necks down so that its walls come into contact with one another and provide a closure portion 77 which closes off the tube 72 beyond the tip of the applicator 64. Passages 78 are provided in the shaft so that there always is a supply of the liquid to be dispensed around the base 66 of the brush 64. However, the sides of the tube 72 are in such contact with the sides of the brush 64 that the liquid does not normally seep past the brush between the brush and the tube. When the curved diaphragm 61 at the rear of the dispenser is dished inwardly to assume the position shown in phantom, the shaft 63 moves the tube 72 and the tube turns further inside out until the tip of the applicator 64 is exposed beyond the diaphragm at the front of the dispenser and the applicator is ready for use.

Having now described the invention in specific detail and exemplified the manner in which it may be carried into practice, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that innumerable variations, modifications, applications, and extensions of the basic principles involved may be made without departing from its spirit and scope.

The invention claimed is:

l. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for movement between and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, and a fitting at one end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and a closure portion completely closing ofi said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, said tube and said applicator being drivably interconnected and said tube moving with said applicator and inverting when said applicator is moved from its retracted to its extended position, the movement of said tube opening said closure portion, said tube increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced inwardly from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions and said tube normally being in their closed and noninverted positions, respectively, and tending to return respectively to these positions and in so doing to retract said applicator.

2. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for axial movement and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, and a fitting at one end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inward- 1y of said tube to contact one another and close 01% said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, said tube and said applicator being drivably interconnected and said tube moving with said applicator and inverting when said applicator is moved axially from its retracted to its extended position, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions, said tube increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced inwardly from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of (the dispenser, said closure portions and said tube normally being in their closed and noninverted positions, respectively, and tending to return respectively to these positions and in so doing to retract said applicator.

3. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for axial movement and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, and a fitting at one end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close oif said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, a sphincter ring extending radially inwardly of said tube adjacent the tip of and gripping the sides of the applicator in its retracted position, said tube moving with said applicator and inverting when said applicator is moved axially from its retracted to its extended position, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions and distending said sphincter ring as the ring is carried with the tube from the inside to the outside of the tube as the tube is inverted, said tube and said ring increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced inwardly from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions, said ring and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said applicator.

4. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for axial movement and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, and a fitting at one end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close off said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, a sphincter ring extending radially inwardly of said tube adjacent the tip of and gripping the sides of the applicator in its retracted position, said applicator being adapted to move with the inner end or" said tube, a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said applicator and said tube, said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and inverting when said applicator is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions and distending said sphincter ring as the ring is carried with the tube from the inside to the outside of the tube as the tube is inverted, said tube and said ring increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced inwardly from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions, said ring and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and 'in so doing to retract said applicator.

5. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for .axial movement and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, a fitting at one end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close oif said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, a sphincter ring extending radially inwardly of said tube adjacent the tip of and gripping the sides of the applicator in its retracted position, said applicator being adapted to move with the inner end of said tube, a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said applicator and said tube, said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and inverting when said applicator is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions and distending said sphincter ring as the ring is carried with the tube from the inside to the outside of the tube as the tube is inverted, said tube and said ring increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions, said ring and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said applicator, and stop means to hold said applicator in its extended position.

6. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, said applicator being mounted in a hollow portion at one end of an elongated reservoir, a fitting at the applicator end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close oil? said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, and a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said reservoir and said tube, said reservoir with said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and said reservoir and inverting when said reservoir is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions, said tube increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said reservoir with said applicator.

7. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, said applicator being mounted in a hollow portion at one end of an elongated reservoir, a fitting at the applicator end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close ofi said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, a sphincter ring extending radially inwardly of said tube adjacent the tip of and gripping the sides of the applicator in its retracted position, and a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said reservoir and said tube, said reservoir with said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and said reservoir and inverting when said reservoir is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portion and distending said sphincter ring as the ring is carried with the tube from the inside to the outside of the tube as the tube is inverted, said tube and said ring increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions, said ring and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said reservoir with said applicator.

8. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, said applicator being slidably mounted in a hollow extension at one end of an elongated reservoir, the applicator being secured to valve means normally urged into closed position to prevent passage of liquid from said reservoir to said applicator, said valve means being displaceable to an open position to allow passage of liquid from said reservoir to said applicator upon slidable movement of said applicator inwardly in said extension, a fitting at the applicator end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close off said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, the inner end of said tube gripping said extension, and a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said reservoir and said tube, said reservoir with said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and said reservoir and inverting when said reservoir is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions, said tube increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said reservoir with said applicator.

9. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, said applicator being slidably mounted in a hollow extension at one end of an elongated reservoir, the applicator being secured to valve means normally urged into closed position to prevent passage of liquid from said reservoir to said applicator, said valve means being displaceable to an open position to allow passage of liquid from said reservoir to said applicator upon slideable movement of said applicator inwardly in said extension, a fitting at the applicator end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close off said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, a sphincter ring extending radially inwardly of said tube adjacent the tip of and gripping the sides of the applicator in its retracted position, the inner end of said tube gripping said extension, and a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said reservoir and said tube, said reservoir with said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and said reservoir and inverting when said reservoir is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions and distending said sphincter ring as the ring is carried with the tube from the inside to the outside of the tube as the tube is inverted, said tube and said ring increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions, said ring and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said reservoir with said applicator.

10. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for movement between and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, a resilient fitting at one end of the dispenser covering said applicator in the retracted position of the applicator and being adapted to move out of the way of and uncover said applicator when the applicator moves from its retracted to its extended position, a portion of said resilient fitting being distended as the applicator moves from its retracted to its extended position, said portion being drivably connected to said applicator and tending to assume its original undistended position and return said applicator from its extended to its retracted position unless the applicator is held in its extended position.

11. A dispenser for nongaseous fluids which comprises an applicator mounted for axial movement and having a retracted and an extended position in said dispenser, and a fitting at one end of the dispenser, said fitting comprising a resilient tube of flexible material around said applicator and closure portions extending radially inwardly of said tube to contact one another and close of]? said tube beyond the tip of said applicator when the applicator is in its retracted position, said applicator being adapted to move with the inner end of said tube, a hollow sleeve of greater diameter than said applicator and said tube, said applicator being mounted to slide in said sleeve, said fitting having a skirt portion extending radially outwardly of said closure portions to connect said fitting with said sleeve, said tube moving with said applicator and inverting when said applicator is moved axially with respect to said sleeve from the retracted to the extended position of the applicator, the movement of said tube opening said closure portions as the tube is inverted, said tube increasing in diameter at the point of inversion of said tube and said point of inversion being spaced inwardly from the tip of the applicator in the extended position of said applicator to expose said tip out of contact with all portions of the dispenser, said closure portions and said tube tending to return respectively to their closed and noninverted positions and in so doing to retract said applicator.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,291,859 Andrews Aug. 4, 1942 2,373,711 Satz et al. Apr. 17, 1945 2,491,241 Zuckerman Dec. 13, 1949 2,591,537 Gordon Apr. 1, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 233,979 Great Britain May 21, 1925

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Classifications
U.S. Classification401/107, 206/361, 15/184, 401/273, 206/229
International ClassificationB05C17/00, A45D34/04
Cooperative ClassificationB05C17/002, A45D34/043
European ClassificationA45D34/04C1, B05C17/00B