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Publication numberUS3035706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1962
Filing dateMar 16, 1960
Priority dateMar 16, 1960
Publication numberUS 3035706 A, US 3035706A, US-A-3035706, US3035706 A, US3035706A
InventorsLee Burke Louis
Original AssigneeDesign & Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rack structures for dishwashing machines
US 3035706 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1962 1.. L. BURKE 3,035,706

RACK STRUCTURES FOR DISK-{WASHING MACHINES Filed Mar 16, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR.

A ou/s LEE Sue K5 BY wav /filin ATTO RNEVS.

May 1962 BURKE 3,035,706

RACK STRUCTURES FOR DISHWASHING MACHINES Filed March 15, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. lows L55 Bus/:5,

GZMWMM ATTORNEYS United States Patent ()filice 3,035,706 Patented May 22, 1962 3,035,706 RACK STRUCTURES FOR DISHWASHING MACHINES Louis Lee Burke, Connersville, Iud., assignor to Design and Manufacturing Corporation, Connersvilie, Iud., a

corporation of Indiana Filed Mar. 16, 1960, Ser. No. 15,310 20 Claims. (Cl. 211-41) Dishwashing machines are generally of two types, ie those having an opening at the side and those having an opening at the top. The tableware is supported in each type on rack structures having parts configured to maintain the individual items of tableware in separated positions so as much of their surfaces as possible is accessible to washing solutions, rinse water, and heated drying gases. It is necessary that the tableware be supported in various superposed layers or tiers. Sometimes when the upper rack is stationary with respect to its central vertical axis, large platters or pans in the lower rack cause spots in the upper rack which are shielded from the wash or rinse action. In this case portions of the surfaces of the tableware may not be accessible to the washing and rinsing solutions. One method of eliminating the effect of blind spots is to rotate the upper tray about its central vertical axis during the washing or rinsing action, thus exposing each tableware piece in the same radial location, to an equal amount of wash or rinse liquid. In a side opening dishwashing machine, it is readily possible to mount superposed rack structures on slides in the body of the machine, the lowermost rack structure being usually slidable over the opened door, so that individual racks may be withdrawn and loaded or unloaded without detaching them from the machine. This method of mounting the racks can be utilized for either a stationary or a rotating upper rack structure.

Such an expedient for mounting the upper rack and for exposing the lower rack, however, is not available for the top opening dishwasher. Various designs have been utilized which solve in part the problem of access to the lower rack in a top opening machine, but none has included the mounting of a rotatable upper rack structure in a top opening machine, which rack structure permits height adjustability and ready access to the lower rack.

It is an object of this invention to provide a rack structure of such character that it will accept tableware in a plurality of layers or tiers but which does not require removal of any part of the rack structure from the machine for loading or unloading.

It is an object of the inventon to provide an upper rack structure of a character which permits access to a lower rack structure from above for loading and unloading without removal of the upper rack structure from the machine.

It is an object of the inventon to provide a combined rack structure including upper and lower rack elements -in which parts of the upper rack element are movable to give access to the lower rack element from above without detachment and removal from the machine.

It is an object of this invention to provide a rotating upper rack structure in a top opening dishwasher.

It is an object of this invention to provide in a top opening dishwasher a rotating upper rack structure capable of being readily adjusted in its vertical position.

These and other objects of the invention, which will be set forth hereinafter or will be apparent to one skilled in the art upon reading these specifications, are accompished by that certain construction and arrangement of parts, of which an exemplary embodiment will now be described. The exemplary embodiment will be set forth in connection with a top opening dishwashing machine, it being understood, however, that its utility is not confined thereto. Reference is made to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a partial perspective view of a top opening dishwashing machine with parts cut away to show the interior rack structure.

FIG. 2 is a partial plan view of a lower rack element, omitting a central upper extension which supports the upper rack element.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of one of the sections of the upper rack element.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the combined rack structure.

FIG. 5 is a partial perspective View showing the upward extension of the lower rack element and the pivoting means for a frame employed in connection with the upper rack element.

FIG. 6 is a partial plan view with parts in section showing the top of the upward extension of the lower rack element.

FIG. 7 is a partial sectional view showing a mode of hinging the sections of the upper rack element to the frame.

Briefly, in the practice of the invention, a lower rack element is provided having means for the engagement of tableware in separated positions, and also with a central upward extension. To this extension a frame is pivotally mounted for turning movement about a vertical axis as hereinafter more fully described. The upper rack element is made up of a plurality of sections which are pivoted to the frame. These sections, when empty, may be swung upwardly about a horizontal axis so as to give access to the lower rack element. This access will be effective over the entire area of the lower rack element because the upper rack element is pivoted for rotary movement.

It will be understood by the skilled worker in the art that the rack elements will, as usual, be made of wire members bent to the desired shapes and welded together. In some instances sheet metal members may be used on or in connection with the rack elements. The rack elements may be constructed of non-oxidizing metal such as stainless steel which is left bare; or the rack elements may be constructed of metal (usually ferrous) wire and given a protective coating of synthetic resinous material by dipping, as is also well known in the art.

FIGS. 1 and 4 illustrate an exemplary form of the preferred rack structure of this invention. In FIG. 1 a top opening dishwashing machine is diagrammatically indicated at 1 and is shown as containing a rack structure made up of a lower rack element 2 and an upper rack element 3. The upper rack element in FIG. 1 is indicated as constructed in two sections, one of which has been swung upwardly as at 4. It will be evident that this swinging of the upper rack section will give access to the lower rack element for loading and unloading.

The rack elements themselves may take various forms in accordance with the size of the dishwashing machine and the nature and amount of tableware which the racks are designed to carry. The racks will have an open work construction so that the washing solutions, rinsing water, and drying gases may be freely distributed throughout the interior cavity or tub of the machine. Without constituting a limitation, an exemplary lower rack element is illustrated in FIG. 2 as comprising circular wire frame mem bers 5, 6 and 7 to which certain bent wire elements 8 are attached. These bent wire members are designed to support plates, saucers, bowls, pans and sometimes cups in separated condition; and their particular shapes are a matter of design forming no limitation on this invention. In some instances the members 8 may be used to connect the circular members 5, 6 and 7 together. In other in- .stances there may be radial members indicated at 9 which serve this function in part. In the particular embodiment, the lower rack element has four extensions 10, 11 located 90 apart. These extensions cause the lower rack element to fit into the rectangular tub of the diswashing machine and prevent the rotation thereof. They may also be so configured as to receive or assist in the support of items of tableware. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the extensions 10, 11 may have substantially radial portions 12 tying the circular member 5 to the circular member 6.

As is common in 'dishwashing racks, the central circular member 7 may carry a disc 13 of perforated metal or wire mesh.

In the structure of this invention, the Wire members 9 are prolonged upwardly at the center of the lower rack element to form, first, a conical configuration 14, lying above the plate 13 and, next, an upwardly extending substantially cylindrical configuration 15. The wires 9 are welded or otherwise attached to a wire ring 16a over which is clamped a metallic washer element 16 near the lower end of the cylindrical configuration, and the upper ends of the wires 9 are attached to another ring 17a at the upper end of the cylindrical configuration, to which ring is fastened another metallic washer 17.

A shaft member having a lower enlarged portion 18 and an upper reduced portion 18a is provided. The lower enlarged portion of the shaft extends through the washers 16 and 17. Several spaced pins 19, 20 and 21 are provided on the enlarged portion 18 of the shaft. Any one of these pins, by engaging the top surface of the washer 17, limits the downward position of the shaft. The washer 17 is provided with a slot 21a through which pins 21 and 20 can pass. This permits adjustment of the vertical position of the shaft, as will readily be understood. Preferably, the top pin 19 is made longer than the slot 21 so as to determine the lowest possible position for the shaft.

As is most clearly illustrated in FIG. 5, the shaft supports a frame consisting of upper and lower horizontal members 22 and 23 and vertical end members 24 and 25. These may be separate members or, as shown in FIG. 5, the frame may be made as a U-shaped structure 23, 24, 25, the open end of which is closed by the member 22. Central portions of the horizontal members 22 and 23 are flattened as indicated at 26 and 27 and are perforated for the reception of the reduced end 18a of the shaft. The position of the frame along the axis of the shaft will be fixed by the engagement of the lower horizontal frame .member 23 at its flattened portion 27 with a bearing element, preferably a ball bearing 27a, supported by the shoulder formed at the juncture of the enlarged portion 18 and reduced portion 18a of the shaft; and the frame will be rotatable with respect to the shaft as indicated by the arrows in FIG. 5.

The upper rack element is made up in two semi-circular sections. One of these sections is illustrated in plan in FIG. 3. It has semi-circular wire members 28, 29, 30, 31 and 32 held together by a series of radial members 33. Since the upper rack sections will usually be desired in the form of trays with sides, there may be additional semicircular elements 34 and 35, the outer ends of the radial elements 33 being turned upwardly and attached to the semi-circular members as by welding. This is shown in FIG. 4.

The straight or diametral portion of each section of the upper rack element will include longitudinal members 36 and 37 which can be joined to and serve as continuations of the semi-circular members 34 and 35, and the ends of the semi-circular members 28, 29, 30 and 31 may be turned upwardly and welded to members 36 and 37. Thus there is formed a semi-circular basket of open work construction. This basket can be provided with such upstanding wire elements 38 and 39 as may be found desirable for the holding of cups, glasses, bowls, or such other items of tableware as may be desired in the upper rack element. Again, the nature of these structures forms no limitation upon the invention.

At spaced positions, each section of the upper rack element bears on its diametral side a pair of hinging elements indicated generally at 49 and '41 in FIG. 3. These are detailed in FIG. 7. Each comprises a straight wire portion 42 which may be welded to the diametral wires 36 and 37, and an end portion bent so as to provide a first bight 43 a second bight 44, and a short straight leg 45 spaced from the portion 42. These hinging elements for each section are intended to engage over the horizontal member 22 of the frame whichhas been described, and the hinging elements are so positioned that they will engage over the horizontal frame member 22 near its ends. The upper ends of the vertical members 24 and 25 are prolonged, as will be evident both from FIGS. 5 and 7, so that the sections of the upper rack element are essentially restrained from movement in the plane of the frame. However, either section can be swung from a horizontal position to a vertical position, as is best shown in FIG. 1. The double bight construction of the hinging members gives, in effect, two pivot points; and it will be clear from FIG. 7 that when one of the sections of the upper rack is swung to the vertical position (as is indicated at the left in FIG. 7), the frame rod 22 engages in the upper bight 43 and that portion of the hinging member which lies between the two bights, by engaging with the horizontal wire 37 of the other section, will hold the vertical section in its upraised position.

When it is desired to lower the upraised section of the upper rack element, this may be done by first pulling upwardly on it until the horizontal rod 22 of the frame lies within the bight 44. Then the rack section may be lowered to the horizontal position. The lower horizontal rod member 23 of the frame will prevent the section swinging to any position below the horizontal.

Should it be desired to remove either or both of the sections of the upper rack element, this may be done easily by pulling upwardly on them while they lie in a horizontal position, since the upper rod 22 of the frame will then slide between the parts 42 and 45 of the hinging member. However, the convenience in use of the hinged sections of the upper rack element is realized by swinging one or the other or both of them to the vertical position whereby access is gained to the lower rack and its contents.

Needless to say, in the embodiment shown, the entire rack structure may be removed from the tub of the dishwashing machine as may be required for special cleaning, repair, or replacement.

Modifications may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit of it. The invention having been described in an exemplary embodiment, what is claimed as new an desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. A rack assembly for a dishwashing machine comprising a lower rack element of openwork construction and having means for holding tableware in an upright position, means substantially centrally located on said lower rack element for supporting an upper rack element, and an upper rack element having sections engaging said supporting means, at least one of said sections being swingable thereon upwardly from a horizontal position to a vertical position in which last mentioned position said section will uncover and permit substantially vertical access to a portion of said lower rack element.

2. The structure claimed in claim 1 including means in connection with said sections of the upper rack element and the supporting means therefor to maintain said sections in vertical and horizontal positions.

3. The structure claimed in claim 2 wherein the supporting means for said upper rack element on said lower rack element includes pivoting means whereby said upper rack element may be turned about a vertical axis.

4. The structure claimed in claim 3 wherein said rack elements are open Work wire structures.

5. The structure claimed in claim 3 in which said pivoting means is adjustable as to height.

6. In a rack structure for dishwashing machines, a lower rack element of open work construction and having means for holding tableware in an upright position, a substantially vertical shaft supported substantially centrally with respect to said lower rack element, .a frame pivoted to said shaft, and an upper rack element comprising sections at least one of which is hinged to said frame, rotatable therewith about said shaft, and swingable with respect to said frame upwardly from a horizontal position to a vertical position, said sections each being of open work construction and having means for holding tableware in a position to be washed.

7. The structure claimed in claim 6 including means in connection with said frame and said section for maintaining said section both in the horizontal and vertical positions.

8. The structure claimed in claim 6 wherein said shaft is adjustable as to height.

9. In a rack structure for dishwashing machines, a lower rack element of open work wire construction and comprising substantially circumferential and substantially radial wire elements in welded union, wherein the substantially radial members are prolonged in the midsection of the lower rack element to extend upwardly to form a supporting means, upper and lower washershaped members attached to said prolonged wire members in spaced relationship, a substantially vertical shaft engaged in said washer-shaped elements, a frame rotatably mounted on said shaft above said supporting structure, and an upper rack element formed in at least two sections hinged to said frame.

10. The structure claimed in claim 9 wherein said shaft is adjustable in an axial direction with respect to the supporting structure of said lower rack element.

11. The structure claimed in claim 9 wherein said shaft carries a series of spaced laterally projecting pins adapted individually to rest upon the upper one of said washer-shaped elements, said last mentioned washershaped elements having a slot located to pass certain at least of said pins whereby the vertical position of said shaft may be adjusted with respect to the said supporting structure of the lower rack element.

12. The structure claimed in claim 11 wherein said shaft has a lower enlarged portion, an upper reduced portion with a shoulder therebetween, and wherein said frame rests against said shoulder.

13. The structure claimed in claim 12 wherein the sections of said upper rack element are provided with means to maintain them in both horizontal and vertical positions.

14. The structure claimed in claim 12 wherein said upper rack sections are provided each with hinging elements and said frame is provided with an upper rod engaged by said hinging elements, said hinging elements havin spaced nights so located that said upper frame rod will be engaged in different bights of said hinging element when its section occupies vertical and horizontal positions there being abutment means adapted to be en aged by the upper portions of the hinging members of an upper rack section between the bights thereof when the rack section is in a vertical position to maintain it in that position.

15. The structure claimed in claim 14 wherein one of the bights of said hinging members has an open portion permitting disengagement of its section from said frame.

16. The structure claimed in claim 15 wherein said frame has end members prolonged upwardly and acting in connection with the hinging members of said upper rack sections to prevent substantial movement of said sections in the plane of said frame.

17. In a rack structure for dishwashing machines, a shaft adapted to be supported in the tub of a dishwashing machine in a substantially vertical position substantially centrally thereof, a frame on said shaft, and a rack element comprising sections of open work construction and having means for holding tableware in a position to be washed, said sections being supported by said frame and at least one of said sections being hinged to said frame and swingable upwardly from a horizontal position to a vertical position thereon.

18. The structure claimed in claim 17 wherein said sections are two in number, each of semi-circular shape in plan and adapted when in horizontal position to extend across the tub of the dishwashing machine but terminating short of the walls of said tub.

19. The structure claimed in claim 17 wherein said sections are two in number, each section being of semicircular shape in plan, each section having about its periphery an upstanding rim, a diametrically extending upper portion of the said rim of each section being pivoted to said frame, a lower part of the same portion of the rim of each section being adapted to contact said frame to prevent said sections from swinging downwardly past the horizontal position.

20. The structure claimed in claim 19 including releasable means in connection with said frame and said sections for maintaining said sections in the vertical position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 879,799 Schmieder Feb. 18, 1908 1,199,770 Elphinstone Oct. 3, 1916 1,476,667 Wood Dec. 4, 192.3

2,897,608 Langendorf Aug. 4, 1959,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US879799 *Jan 17, 1907Feb 18, 1908William Wesley SterlingClothes-drier.
US1199770 *Oct 9, 1915Oct 3, 1916Alexander C ElphinstoneTripod-support.
US1476667 *Nov 16, 1922Dec 4, 1923Wood Harold GClothes drier
US2897608 *Feb 11, 1957Aug 4, 1959Avey Langendorf LeoneRotary display racks for clothing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3126900 *May 28, 1962Mar 31, 1964Design and Manufacturing CorporationSpray-tube dishwasher
US4498401 *Oct 28, 1981Feb 12, 1985Hannecke Wolf DietrichArticle display stand
US4512262 *Dec 14, 1981Apr 23, 1985Hannecke Wolf DietrichArticle display stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/41.8, 211/165, 211/166, D32/3
International ClassificationA47L15/50
Cooperative ClassificationA47L15/30, A47L15/50
European ClassificationA47L15/30, A47L15/50