Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3036517 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1962
Filing dateOct 29, 1958
Priority dateOct 29, 1958
Publication numberUS 3036517 A, US 3036517A, US-A-3036517, US3036517 A, US3036517A
InventorsFrank E Malarsky
Original AssigneeFrank E Malarsky
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can crusher
US 3036517 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 29, 1962 F. E. MALARSKY 3,036,517

CAN CRUSHER Filed Oct. 29, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. Fymvmtfh Lnqslqy A frog/vs? "May 29, 1962 F. E. MALARSKY 3,036,517

CAN CRUSHER Ti 2Y2.

Filed Oct. 29, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. fZzq/v/ EMA LAQGKY This invention relates to a machine for crushing cans. Machines of the particular class are quite old in the art, and generally involve a pair of relatively reciprocating plates. As the plates rciprocate relatively to one another, the can to be crushed gradually moves downwardly between the plates until it drops into a container.

Machines of the particular class have not been particularly successful, due to the fact that the cans have a tendency to plug the machine through improper functioning of the machine when cans are fed rapidly into the machine, with a plurality of cans in the machine at one time. The task of removing the partially crushed cans is very considerable, particularly since it may require the power actuation of the machine, involving hazards to the hands.

I have conceived a structure involving basically the gripping of the cans during the crushing movement so that the cans are maintained in a particular position relatively to the plates of the machine that engage the cans to crush them. Naturally, the gripping means must release the cans in a desired manner, and this can be determined by particularly shaping the can crushing plates. Under this concept, there is an orderly movement of the cans through the machine with each can moving downwardly into a container.

As a further particular feature of my invention, construct the crushing plates so that they may readily receive a can to be crushed but yet present a limiting surface adapted to receive a can in the event the can tends to pop upwardly during the initial crushing operation.

As a still even more particular feature of my invention, the crushing plates are so constructed that once a can moves downwardly into final crushing position, it is released through the reciprocation of the plates, with this releasing movement opening a rather large passageway so that the crushed cans cannot, due to a springlike expansion, clog the machine.

As a still further feature of my invention, I arrange for the reciprocation at all times to be of suflicient magnitude relatively to the gripping means, so that the gripping means will be positively withdrawn from engagement with the cans during each reciprocation, even at that point where the cans are crushed to their thinnest possible condi tion.

I have thus outlined rather broadly the more important features of my invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that my contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of my invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject of the claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which my disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures for carrying out the several purposes of my invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions as do not depart from the spirit and scope of my invention, in order to prevent the appropriation of my invention by those skilled in the art.

Referring now to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a vertical section through the machine of my invention.

FIG. 2 is a view looking downwardly on the machine.

FIG. 3 is a section taken along lines 3-3 of FIG. 1.

Patented May 29, 15 62 ice FIG. 4 is a section taken along lines 4-4- of FIG. 1.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, my machine comprises a lower base and container 10 on which is supported the crushing apparatus. This apparatus includes an electric motor 11, which through a standard gear drive contained in a housing 12, actuates a sprocket 13. Sprocket 13 drives a usual type of link chain 14 that in turn drives a sprocket 15 rotatable with a shaft 16, the shaft 16 being supported in suitable brackets 17 carried by a plate 18 forming part of the upper casing of my crushing machine.

The plate 18 is suitably welded or otherwise secured to the base and container 10 and is also welded or otherwise secured to side plates 19 and 20, this entire integral structure being welded or otherwise secured to the base It so as to form an integral part thereof. The plate closing the side of the upper casing opposite plate 18 will be described presently. Those skilled in the art Will appreciate that the manner in which the various parts are fabricated and held in position is of no particular importance.

Keyed to the shaft 16 at 23 is an eccentric cam 21 adapted to rotate in a yoke 22 that is pivoted by pin 23 to a pair of brackets 24. These brackets 24 are welded to a crushing plate 25 that is shaped as shown best in FIG. 1, the crushing plate 25 being pivoted at its lower end through spaced brackets 26 for reciprocating movement on a shaft 27 suitably mounted in the opposed plates 19 and 29 of the upper casing of my machine.

The crushing plate 25 is curved as shown best in FIG. 1, and is formed with a series of ridges 30 that are horizontal in the normal position of the crushing plate in the machine. The crushing plate 25 is further reversely curved at 31 so as to present a limiting surface to prevent the popping upwardly of the cans, all as heretofore generally described. It is obvious that the rotation of the sprocket 15 will effect rotation of the eccentric cam 21, which will in turn actuate the yoke 22 and reciprocate the crushing plate 25 on the shaft 27. The magnitude of the reciprocation is rather considerable relatively to the size of the ridges 30, so that the ridges will move away from the can that is being crushed during each reciprocation, as has already been outlined.

Coacting with the crushing plate 25 there is a stationary crushing plate 35 shaped as best illustrated in FIG. 1. actually, the plate 35 forms one end of the upper casing of the machine and is, therefore, integral with the base 10 as well as the plates '18, 15, and 20. Crushing plate 35 is thus preferably stationary, and is welded or otherwise secured in position. It is flared at its upper end at 36 and is also flared outwardly at 37. The plate 35 is corrugated as best shown at 38 in FIG. 2 in order better to coact with the cans that are being crushed. At this point it will be well to note that the lower end of the moving crushing plate 25 is flared at '35 to present an opening 40 between it and the flared portion 37 of the stationary crushing plate 35. It should be noted that this opening is above the axis of reciprocation of the crushing plate 25 so that there will be an enlargement of the space 40 each time the crushing plate 25 moves away from the stationary plate 35.

In actual operation, a can C will be dropped into the space between the plate 25 and 35, this space being funnel-like in cross-sectional shape as best seen in FIG. 1. The movement of the crushing plate 25 toward stationary plate 35 will first cause the corrugations 38 and the cross ridges 30 to engage the can C so as to hold it as it receives its initial crushing operation. The can, therefore, cannot move vertically relatively to the plates either upwardly or downwardly during this crushing operation. However, should the initial contact between the corrugations and the cross ridges 30 not hold the can, it will pop upwardly somewhat, but will be limited by the surface 3 1 of the crushing plate 25 so as not to injure a bystander. In actual practice utilizing the ridges and corrugations, I have found the cans will not generally move upwardly and will be gripped for proper coaction with the machine.

When the reciprocating plate 25 moves away from stationary plate 35, the can C will be released naturally by the corrugations 38 and the cross ridges 3t) and will drop downwardly as best seen at C1. Again, when the crushing plate 25 moves toward crushing plate 35, the can will be gripped and will be held during the crushing operation. It will be appreciated that since each can is held during each crushing operation, when there are a series of cans being crushed, and with the cans superimposed as when fed sequentially into the machine, each can will be released at approximately the same time as the can above it. However, through the proper design of the curvature of plate 35, the nature of the construction is such that the lowermost positioned can may be released first so as to move outwardly of the machine, after which the next can above will move downwardly, then the next can, and so on. Thus, the lowermost can C4 may move outwardly as illustrated in FIG. 1, after which can C2 will be released, and thereafter can C1 and so on. In other words, the gripping of the cans and the arrangement of the crushing surfaces is such that there may be an orderly procession or movement of the cans out of the machine, thereby preventing the clogging of the machine. In other words, a particular shaping of the moving crushing plate 25 relatively to the stationary plate 35, combined with the corrugations and ridges, may control in any manner desired, the movement of cans being crushed so as to crush the cans effectively while avoiding the clogging of the machine.

Further, the space 40 is effective also to prevent clogging, by opening an enlarged passage during each reciprocation. I believe that my contribution to the art will now be quite apparent.

I new claim:

1. In a can crusher of the class described, a frame, a pair of rigid plates, each of said plates having can crushing areas between which cans are received for movement from a position at the upper ends of said crushing areas downwardly between said crushing areas for escape from said crushing areas as maximum crushed cans, means pivotally mounting at least one of said plates on a horizontal pivot for reciprocation of its area toward and away from the area of the other plate, said pivotal mounting means being on an axis fixed relatively to said frame and at the lower end of said one plate below its crushing area, said plates being shaped to form therebetween a vertical space having a funnel-like vertical section in all relative positions thereof above a particular point vertically disposed above said pivotal mounting means, means for reciprocating said plates toward and away from one another for changing the said vertical section size cyclically so that a series of reciprocations effects the gradual crushing of a can moving downwardly in said funnel-like space, at least one of said plates being bowed and curved convexly in a graduated manner toward and relatively to the other plate above said point to accommodate cans in a noncrushed condition graduated to a maximum crushed condition and formed with can holding protuberances for controlling the movement of the cans, the form and contour of said bowing and curve being such that the plates control the movement of said cans downwardly in predetermined sequence so that the lowermost maximum crushed cans are released by the separation of said plates for escape movement out of said funnel-like curve contoured vertical section at said particular point just prior to the release of the immediately superimposed cans by said protuberances of the plates for movement downwardly from a portion of said vertical section immediately above that just occupied by said maximum crushed cans, whereby the max mum crushed cans will escape from between said plates prior to the downward movement of the immediately superimposed cans into a position for maximum crushing, thereby preventing clogging of said cans in said funnellike vertical section, and the lower end of at least said one rigid pivoting plate below said particular point being outwardly flared away from the other plate whereby the expansion of a can after crushing above said particular point will not cause said can to stick in said funnel-like space as said can moves past said particular point.

2. In a can crusher of the class described, a frame, a pair of rigid plates, each of said plates having can crushing areas between which cans are received for movement from a position at the upper ends of said crushing areas downwardly between said crushing areas for escape from said crushing areas as maximum crushed cans, means pivotally mounting at least one of said plates on a horizontal pivot for reciprocation of its area toward and away from the area of the other plate, said pivotal mounting means being on an axis fixed relatively to said frame and at the lower end of said one plate below its crushing area said plates being shaped to form therebetween a vertical space having a funnel-like vertical section in all relative positions thereof above a particular point vertically disposed above said pivotal mounting means, means for reciprocating said plates toward and away from one another for changing the said vertical section size cyclically so that a series of reciprocations effects the gradual crushing of a can moving downwardly in said funnel-like space, at least one of said plates being bowed and curved convexly in a graduated manner toward and relatively to the other plate above said point .to accommodate cans in a non-crushed condition graduated to a maximum crushed condition and formed with can holding protuberances for controlling the movement of the cans, the form and contour of said bowing and curve being such that the plates control the movement of said cans downwardly in predetermined sequenceso that the lowermost maximum crushed cans are released by the separation of said plates for escape movement out of said funnel-like curve contoured vertical section at said particular point just prior to the release of the immediately superimposed cans by said protuberances of the plates for movement downwardly from a portion of said vertical section immediately above that just occupied by said maximum crushed cans, whereby the maximum crushed cans will escape from between said plates prior to the downward movement of the immediately superimposed cans into a position for maximum crushing, thereby preventing clogging of said cans in said funnel-like section.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,246,394 Steele June 17, 1941 2,356,122 Edwards Aug. 15, 1944 2,619,150 Smith Nov. 25, 1952 2,593,657 Coon et al. Apr. 22, 1957 2,920,554 Bunke Jan. 12, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 26,206 Great Britain Aug. 19, 1909 of 1908

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2246394 *Dec 24, 1938Jun 17, 1941James W SteeleCan crushing means
US2356122 *Dec 15, 1942Aug 15, 1944Harold G EdwardsCrushing machine
US2593657 *Jun 10, 1949Apr 22, 1952Int Harvester CoAir swept crusher for fluorescent light tubes
US2619150 *Jan 10, 1950Nov 25, 1952Modern Metal Products CompanyCan crushing mechanism
US2920554 *Feb 20, 1958Jan 12, 1960Frederick H BunkeCan crusher
GB190926206A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3299802 *Apr 8, 1965Jan 24, 1967Jr John W BlackDevice for flattening cans
US3564994 *Aug 22, 1968Feb 23, 1971Mosley Fred ECrusher-feeder apparatus
US3772985 *Dec 13, 1971Nov 20, 1973W GirtenCan crushing apparatus
US3776128 *Feb 29, 1972Dec 4, 1973D MorrisApparatus for crushing cans
US3951059 *Jan 20, 1975Apr 20, 1976Drew-It CorporationApparatus for crushing material
US4195562 *Jul 28, 1978Apr 1, 1980Mickler Edwin WCan disintegrating apparatus and method
US4316410 *Jun 30, 1980Feb 23, 1982Davis Jr Charles MCompact can crusher
US4444100 *Jan 4, 1982Apr 24, 1984Canmaster, Inc.Can crushing machine
US4573405 *Jul 19, 1984Mar 4, 1986Morlock Ruben DCan crushing machine
US4653398 *Jul 18, 1985Mar 31, 1987Fowler Enterprises, Inc.Aluminum can compactor and method
US5331889 *Sep 25, 1992Jul 26, 1994Edlund Company, Inc.Manual multiple size can crusher
DE1627256C3 *Nov 17, 1967Apr 11, 1974Rheinstahl AgSchrottschere mit Vorverdichtung des eingefuellten Schrottes
Classifications
U.S. Classification100/233, 100/902
International ClassificationB30B9/32
Cooperative ClassificationB30B9/322, Y10S100/902
European ClassificationB30B9/32B2