Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3036639 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1962
Filing dateMay 2, 1960
Priority dateMay 2, 1960
Publication numberUS 3036639 A, US 3036639A, US-A-3036639, US3036639 A, US3036639A
InventorsBaker John R
Original AssigneeBaker Oil Tools Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expandible packing apparatus
US 3036639 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet l JNVENTOR. B. BAKEE flrraen/sys.

May 29, 1962 J. R. BAKER EXPANDIBLE PACKING APPARATUS Filed May 2, 1960 May 29, 1962 J. R. BAKER EXPANDIBLE PACKING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 2, 1960 INVENTOR. ZIOHN E. Bfi/(EE flTTOE/VEYS.

nite rates 3,636,639 Patented May 29, 1962 ice 3,336,639 EXPANDHBLE PACKING APPARATUS John R. Baker, Pasadena, Calif assignor to Baker Oil Tools, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Filed May 2, 1960, Ser. No. 26,227 10 Claims. (Cl. 166201) The present invention relates to subsurface well bore apparatus, and more particularly to packing devices that are expandible outwardly into sealing engagement with a surrounding well casing, or similar conduit string, disposed in a well bore.

Packers adapted to be set in Well casing, and similar conduit strings, disposed in well bores embody normally retracted packing elements or apparatus surrounding the bodies of the packers, the packing element being adapted to be expanded outwardly into sealing engagement with the well casing. At times, leakage of fluid occurs between an expanded packing element and the well casing, or between the expanded packing element and the body of the packer, or both. Such leakage has occurred at relatively low fluid pressures and has either remained fairly constant or increased as the fluid pressure increased.

An object of the present invention is to provide an expandible packing apparatus which will not leak after having been expanded against the surrounding well casing, either around the exterior or interior of the packing apparatus.

Another object of the invention is to provide a packing apparatus adapted to be expanded against the well casing and in which the fluid pressure in the casing is caused to provide a leakproof seal between the exterior of the packing apparatus and the well casing, and also between the interior of the packing apparatus and the body on which the packing apparatus is mounted.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of several forms in which it may be embodied. Such forms are shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. These forms will now be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a longitudinal section through a well packer disposed in a well casing, with the packer parts in retracted position;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1, with the packer parts expanded against the wall of the well casing;

FIG. 3 is a cross-section taken along the line 33 on FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary longitudinal section through another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a section, on a reduced scale, taken along the line 5-5 on FIG. 4.

The packing assembly or apparatus A illustrated in the drawings is adapted to form part of a well packer to be anchored in packed-oif condition within a well casing B, or similar conduit string. The well packer itself can be lowered in the well casing to the desired setting point by means of a suitable running-in string (not shown), and its parts can be expanded outwardly by a suitable setting apparatus (not shown). As an example, the well packer A may be run in the Well casing on a wire line secured to a setting apparatus and appropriately related to the well packer, all as shown, for example, in US. Patent 2,637,- 402. Since the particular motive power device for set ting the packer forms no part of the present invention, it has not been illustrated herein in the interest of clarity.

The packer includes a main body 10 carrying a set of upper segmental slips 11 adapted to be moved into engagement with the casing by an upper frusto-conical expander 12 which is retained initially in position by one or more shear screws 13 securing it to the body. The upper slips 11 are also retained initially in retracted position by shear screws 14 attaching them to the upper expander. A set of lower segmental slips 15 is initially held in retracted position by being attached to a lower expander 16 by shear screws 17, this expander being held in an initial position by shear screws 18, or the like, threaded into the body.

The upper and lower expanders 12, 16 are longitudinally spaced from one another and a packing assembly or ap paratus A is disposed therebetween. This assembly in cludes a packing sleeve 19 of a pliant, elastic material, such as synthetic or natural rubber, positioned between the expanders 12, 16 and being disposed initially in a retracted position free from contact with the wall of the well casing B. Relative movement of the expanders or abutments 12, 16 toward one another will shorten the packing sleeve 19 and expand it outwardly against the wall of the well casing, as well as inwardly into firm sealing engagement with the periphery of the packer body 10.

The pliant, elastic material of the packing sleeve 19 may be prevented from cold flowing or extruding through the clearance spaces that exist between the upper and lower expanders 12, 16 and the wall of the surrounding casing B by an extrusion preventing device 20 placed at each end of the packing sleeve. As specifically shown, the end 21 of the upper mandrel or abutment 12 is tapered in an upward and outward direction, the confronting portion 22 of the packing sleeve also being tapered in a downward and outward direction, defining a generally triangularly shaped groove between the tapered surfaces 21, 22 which extend circumferentially around the abutment 12 and the confronting portion of the packing sleeve 19. An outer metallic ring 23 is positioned in the groove, having an inner tapered surface 24 engageable and companion to the tapered surface 21 on the abutment. This ring is also generally triangular in cross-section. More specifically, it is of generally right triangular cross-section with its outer surface 25 cylindrical and with its lower surface 26 fiat and substantially normal to the axis of the well packer.

An inner ring 27, reversely arranged to the outer ring 23, is also disposed in the lower portion of the groove, having a tapered inner surface 28 engageable with and companion to the tapered surface 22 on the packing sleeve 19. This inner ring is also of generally triangular crosssection, specifically being of generally right triangular cross-section. Its outer surface 29 is cylindrical and forms a continuation of the outer surface 25' of the other ring 23. Its upper surface 30 is also normal to the axis of the Well packer and abuts the lower surface 26 of the outer ring.

The inner and outer rings 23, 27 substantially fill the triangular groove defined by the tapered surfaces 21, 22 on the upper expander or abutment 12 and the packing sleeve. These rings are each split and normally tend to remain in a retracted position, as disclosed in FIG. 1. However, the rings 23, 27 are expandible outwardly by the packing sleeve 19 when the latter is shortened, to expand it outwardly against the well casing B so as to bring the cylindrical surfaces 25, 29 of the rings into engagement with the wall of the well casing.

To assure the same extent of outward expansion of the rings 23, 27, they are keyed to one another for circumferential slidable movement with respect to one another,

with relative radial movement being prevented by an arcuate key and slot arrangement. This key and slot arrangement consists of a circumferential rib 32 on one of the rings 27 projecting upwardly from its upper face and fitting within a companion circumferential groove 33 in the lower portion of the outer ring 23. Because of the key and keyway or slot arrangement 32, 33, the rings will expand outwardly to the same extent. However, the interconnection 32, 33 between the rings will not prevent such expansion from occurring.

A similar flow preventing device 20 is provided between the lower expander or abutment 1d and the lower confronting portion of the pliant, elastic packing sleeve 19.

The packing sleeve 19, when in a retracted position, has its exterior 34 generally cylindrical and having a substantial running clearance with the wall of the well casing B. The packing sleeve has an internal groove 35' in its mid portion extending circumferentially around the entire sleeve, this groove having tapered sides 36 that converge toward each other in a lateral outward direction. Fluid communication between a region externally of the packing sleeve 19 and the inner groove 35 is provided by a plurality of circumferentially arranged generally radial holes or passages 37 that extend from the periphery of the packing sleeve into the groove.

It is to be noted that there is a pliant, elastic seal ring 38, such as a rubber or rubber-like O ring, disposed in the internal groove 35 of the packing assembly. This ring may snugly fit the periphery of the packer body 119 and is adapted to move upwardly into engagement with the upper tapered side wall 36 of the packing sleeve groove, and also downwardly into engagement with the lower tapered side 36 of the groove 35 for the purpose of preventing leakage of fluid between the packing sleeve 19 and the packer body 10. The inner surface of the packing sleeve on opposite sides of the groove 35 may be cylindrical and engage the periphery of the packer body It).

Initially, the upper slips 11, packing sleeve 19 together with its extrusion preventing devices 20, and lower slips 15 are disposed in their retracted positions, such as illustrated in FIG. 1, the lower slips 15 being adjacent to a lower body member 40 suitably secured onto the body itself. Through use of the wire line setting device illustrated in United States Patent 2,637,402, the well packer is lowered in the well casing to the desired setting point, at which the packer is set in the well bore, as by exerting an upward force on the body 10 and a downward force on the upper slips 11. Such setting action effects a disruption of the shear screws 14 holding the upper slips 11 to the upper expander 12, such slips moving downwardly along the upper expander and into anchoring engagement with the wall of the well casing B. The setting force also disrupts the shear screws 13 holding the upper expander 12 to the body 10, enabling the body to move upwardly relative to the upper expander and upper slips, shifting the lower expander or abutment 16 toward the upper expander or abutment 12 to shorten the packing sleeve 19 and etfect its compression between the abutments 12, 16 so that it expands outwardly into engagement with the wall of the well casing. Upward movement of the body 10 can then also disrupt the shear screw 18, 17 holding the lower expander 16 to the body and the lower slips to the lower expander, the lower body member 40 shifting the lower slips 15' upwardly along the lower expander or abutment 16 and outwardly into anchoring engagement with the wall of the well casing, such as disclosed in FIG. 2.

The shortening and compression of the packing sleeve 19 will also cause the packing sleeve itself, and the upper and lower abutment 12, 16 to expand the upper and lower sets of extrusion preventing rings 2% outwardly into engagement with the wall of the well casing to bridge the clearance space between the upper and lower abutments and the wall of the well casing )3. Although the extrusion preventing devices 26' are disclosed, they form no part of the present invention.

However, it is preferred to use them in connection with the pliant, elastic packing sleeve 19, inasmuch as they insure the maintenance of the packing sleeve material at the proper location against the well casing B and prevent their being squeezed or extruded through the clearance spaces between the upper and lower expanders 12, 16 and the wall of the well casing.

As shown in FIG. 2, the packing apparatus A is disposed against the well casing B and also against the periphery of the body 1 of the tool. The formation of the internal groove 35 in the mid portion of the packing sleeve, and also the passage holes 37 between the exterior and interior of the packing sleeve, in effect, causes the packing sleeve 19 to function as two opposed cup types of packing elements that seal against the wall of the well casing. Thus, fluid under pressure from below the apparatus can squeeze past the outer portion of the imperforate lower part 1% of the packing sleeve to its mid portion where it passes inwardly through the passageways 37 in the mid portion to the interior of the packing sleeve, and act on the upper tapered face 36 of the packing sleeve and tend to urge the upper portion of the sleeve in an outward direction against the well casing, thereby precluding such fluid pressure from flowing upwardly around the exterior of the upper portion 19a of the packing sleeve. At the same time, this fluid under pressure tending to flow upwardly around the packing sleeve will also engage the inner seal ring 38 within the groove 35 and force it upwardly along the body 10 of the packer and against the upper tapered side 36 of the packing sleeve defining the inner groove. The engagemerit of the ring with this tapered side urges the ring 38 inwardly against the periphery of the body 10. In addition, the pressure of the fluid acting upwardly on the seal ring 38 causes the latter to exert a mechanical force on the upper portion 19a of the packing sleeveexerted partially in an outward direction, and tending to maintain the upper outer portion 19a of the packing sleeve sealed against the inner wall of the well casing B.

If, instead of the fluid pressure differential being present below the well packer, it is present above the packing element 19, such fluid under pressure may then pass downwardly around the exterior of the imperforate upper portion 1% of the packing sleeve to its mid portion, flowing inwardly through the holes or passageways 37 in the mid portion into the groove 35 and acting on the lower tapered face 36 of the groove to urge the lower portion 19b of the packing sleeve in an outward direction, sealing it more firmly against the wall of the well casing B, and precluding downward flow of fluid between the exterior of the lower portion of the packing sleeve and the wall of the well casing. At the same time, this fluid under pressure will also act in a downward direction on the seal ring 38, shifting it downwardly along the body It? and against the lower side 36 of the groove, placing the seal ring in leakproof engagement with the periphery of the body and also with the lower side of the groove, thereby preventing fluid from leaking between the periphery of the body 10 and the lower, inner surface of the packing sleeve. Again, the fluid pressure acting on the seal ring 38 exerts a mechanical force on the lower portion 19b of the packing sleeve partially in an outward direction, to insure the maintenance of a proper leakproof seal between the lower portion 19b of the packing sleeve and the wall of the well casing B.

The upper and lower parts 19a, 19b of the packing sleeve are essentially two opposed cut types of packing elements, each having a base portion bearing against its adjacent abutment 12 or 16, and a lip portion at the mid portion of the packing sleeve containing the passage holes 37, the lip portions being adapted to contact the well casing B upon expansion of the packing 19.

In the absence of the lateral passages 37 through the V packing sleeve, it is found that the seal ring 33 within the internal groove 35 is still effective to prevent leakage between the interior of the packing sleeve 19 and the periphery of the packer body 1%. With a pressure differential acting from below the packing sleeve, any fluid pressure that might pass between the lower portion of the sleeve and the body will act upon the seal ring 38 and wedge it between the upper wall 36 and the periphery of the body 10, to preclude leakage between the upper portion 19a of the packing sleeve and the periphery of the body. Conversely, with a pressure differential above the packing sleeve 19, any fluid under pressure that would leak between the upper portion of the packing sleeve and the body acts upon the seal ring 38 and moves it down wardly into engagement with the lower tapered side 36 of the groove and the periphery of the body, precluding leakage between the lower portion 19b of the packing sleeve and the body of the tool. The arrangement just described prevents leakage in both directions between the packing sleeve 19 and the exterior of the body 10, whereas the arrangement illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, including the passages 37, not only prevents the aforenoted leakage, but is found to be more effective in also preventing leakage in both directions around the exterior of the packing sleeve 19, regardless of the direction in which fluid under pressure is acting.

In the form of invention disclosed in FIGS. 4 and 5, the internal seal ring or O ring 380, made of pliant, elastic material, such as rubber or synthetic rubber, is mounted in an internal groove in a filler ring 5!. made of cast iron, or similar material, the filler ring 51 and seal ring 38a slidably engaging the periphery of the packer body 10. The filler ring 51 is of the generally triangular shape shown, conforming essentially to the shape of an internal groove 52 formed in the mid portion of the packing sleeve 19d. Thus, the filler ring 51 has an upper surface 53 inclined in an upward and inward direction and engaging a companion inner wall 54 of the groove 52, the filler ring also having a lower side S5 inclined in a downward and inward direction and engaging a companion lower side 56 of the groove. As disclosed, the mid portion of the packing 19d is imperforate, inasmuch as radial holes or passages are omitted therefrom.

As a result of the movement of the upper and lower abutments 12, 16 toward each other, and the shortening of the packing sleeve 19d and its outward expansion into engagement with the wall of the well casing B, as well as with the periphery of the body, the foregoing arrangement is found to seal effectively under low pressure differentials, as well as high pressure diflerentials, and also under intermediate ranges of pressure. It is believed that the metal ring 51 and the seal ring 38a are effective in sealing off pressure, both internally of the packing element and externally thereof, since any fluid pressure that tends to leak under the packing, as from below, acts upon the metal ring 51 and tends to shift the metal ring upwardly of the expanded packing sleeve 19d. Because of the tapered relationship between the upper surface 53 of the metal ring and the companion upper side 54 of the packing sleeve groove 52, such upward movement of the metal ring tends to expand the upper portion 19!: of the packing sleeve more firmly against the periphery of the well casing B, thereby preventing fluid from flowing upward past the exterior of the packing sleeve. The pliant, elastic seal ring 38a in the metal ring 51 seals against the body 10 of the packer and precludes fluid from leaking through the interior of the packing sleeve.

On the other hand, if fluid pressure is acting on the packing assembly from above, it will tend to flow between the interior of the packing sleeve 19d and the body 10, shifting the filler ring 51 downwardly of the body and the packing sleeve 19d, causing the lower tapered side 55 of the filler ring to engage the companion side 56 of the packing sleeve groove and urge the lower portion 19 of the packing sleeve outwardly more firmly against the wall of the well casing B, precluding leakage of fluid in a downward direction between the exterior of the packing sleeve and the casing. Similarly, the seal ring 33a within the metal ring 51 is deformed by the fluid pressure against the periphery of the packer body 10 to prevent leakage of fluid between the packer body and the lower portion of the packing sleeve.

I claim:

1. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means; and means in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and packing, said means in said space comprising a pliant, elastic annular member slidably sealing against said mounting means.

2. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments, said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means and defined by opposed side walls diverging with respect to each other in a direction toward the axis of said mounting means; and means in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and side walls, said means in said space comprising a pliant, elastic annular member slidably sealing against said mounting means.

3. In a Well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore; mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abtuments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means; means in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and packing, said means in'said space comprising a pliant, elastic annular member slidably sealing against said mounting means; said mid portion having fluid passage means extending from its exterior between said imperforate portions to said space to permit fluid under pressure to pass from the exterior of said packing into said space and act on said imperforate portions to force said imperforate portions outwardly into engagement with the well conduit and also act on said means in said space to force said means in said space against said packing and its annular member against said mounting means.

4. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means and defined by opposed side walls diverging with respect to each other in a direction toward the axis of said mounting means; means in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and side walls, said means in said space comprising a pliant, elastic annular member slidably sealing against said mounting means; said mid portion having fluid passage means extending from its exterior between said imperforate portions to said space to permit fluid under pressure to pass from the exterior of said packing into said space and act on said imperforate portions to force said imperforate portions outwardly into engagement with the well conduit and also act on said means in said space to force said means in said space against said side walls and said annular member against said mounting means.

5. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: moimting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move saidbase portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means; and a pliant, elastic annular member in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and packing.

6. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutmentss mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means and defined by opposed side walls diverging with respect to each other in a direction toward the axis of said mounting means; and a pliant, elastic annular member in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and side walls.

7. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means; a pliant, elastic annular member in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and packing; said mid portion having fluid passage means extending from its exterior between said imperforate portions to said space to permit fluid under pressure to pass from the exterior of said packing into said space and act on said imperforate portions to force said imperforate portions outwardly into engagement with the well conduit and also act on said annular member to force said annular member against said passage and against said mounting means.

8. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means and defined by opposed side walls diverging with respect to each in a direction toward the axis of said mounting means; a pliant, elastic annular member in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and packing and engageable with said mounting means and side walls; said mid portion having fluid passage means extending from its exterior between said imperforate portions to said space to permit fluid under pressure to pass from the exterior of said packing into said space and act on said imperforate portions to force said imperforate portions outwardly into engagement with the well conduit and also act on said annular member to force said annular member against said side walls and against said mounting means.

9. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with said abutments; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid pontion, and an imperforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the well conduit upon relative movement of said abutments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential Space therewithin confronting said mounting means; a ring in said space movable with respect to said mounting means and engageable with said packing, said ring having an internal circumferential groove; and a pliant, elastic annular member in said groove slida'oly sealing against said mounting means.

10. In a well tool to be lowered in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: mounting means; upper and lower abutments mounted on said mounting means and movable longitudinally with respect to each other; an inherently retracted, pliant, elastic one-piece packing mounted on said mounting means between and engageable with 9 said abut-merits; said packing including upper and lower base portions engaging said upper and lower abutments, respectively, a mid portion, and an I'm-perforate portion between said mid portion and each base portion adapted to be expanded into sealing engagement with the Well conduit upon relative movement of said abntments toward each other to move said base portions toward each other, said mid portion having an internal circumferential space therewithin confronting said mounting means and defined by opposed side Walls diverging With respect to each other in a direction toward the axis of said mounting means; a ring in said space movable with respeet to said mounting means, said ring having tapered 10 sides companion to and engageable with the side Walls of said packing, said ring having an internal circumferential groove; and a pliant, elastic member in said groove slidably sealing against said mounting means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,299,368 Mack Apr. 1, 1919 2,451,762 Millikan Oct. 19, 1948 2,637,402 Baker et al. May 5, 1953 2,756,827 Farrar July 31, 1956 2,764,244 Page Sept. 25, 1956 2,944,604 Baker July 12, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1299368 *Aug 31, 1915Apr 1, 1919Oil Well Supply CoPacking structure.
US2451762 *Jul 4, 1945Oct 19, 1948Geophysical Res CorpPacking ring
US2637402 *Nov 27, 1948May 5, 1953Baker Oil Tools IncPressure operated well apparatus
US2756827 *Sep 10, 1952Jul 31, 1956Farrar Willie WRetrievable well packers with opposing slips
US2764244 *Apr 14, 1952Sep 25, 1956Page John SWell tool
US2944604 *Oct 30, 1956Jul 12, 1960Baker Oil Tools IncRetrievable well packer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3215208 *Jun 8, 1961Nov 2, 1965Otis Eng CoSealing devices
US3227462 *Jun 10, 1964Jan 4, 1966Otis Eng CoSeal assemblies for tubular conductors
US3278192 *Oct 8, 1962Oct 11, 1966Otis Eng CoSealing devices
US4411435 *Jun 15, 1981Oct 25, 1983Baker International CorporationSeal assembly with energizing mechanism
US4421323 *Aug 30, 1982Dec 20, 1983Greene, Tweed & Co., Inc.Oil well string member with static seal
US4745972 *Jun 10, 1987May 24, 1988Hughes Tool CompanyWell packer having extrusion preventing rings
US5103904 *May 14, 1991Apr 14, 1992Baker Hughes IncorporatedSealing assembly for subterranean well packing unit
US5176217 *May 14, 1991Jan 5, 1993Baker Hughes IncorporatedSealing assembly for subterranean well packing unit
US5667040 *Dec 12, 1995Sep 16, 1997New York Air Brake CorporationMethod for changing a packing cup on a brake actuation-slack adjuster
US6598672Oct 9, 2001Jul 29, 2003Greene, Tweed Of Delaware, Inc.Anti-extrusion device for downhole applications
US8151894Feb 25, 2011Apr 10, 2012Swelltec LimitedDownhole apparatus with a swellable support structure
US8201832Sep 8, 2008Jun 19, 2012Cameron International CorporationMulti-elastomer seal
US8397803 *Jul 6, 2010Mar 19, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Packing element system with profiled surface
US8408316Feb 28, 2012Apr 2, 2013Swelltec LimitedDownhole apparatus with a swellable support structure
US8584764Mar 25, 2013Nov 19, 2013Swelltec LimitedDownhole apparatus with a swellable support structure
US8602116 *Apr 12, 2010Dec 10, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sequenced packing element system
US20110247835 *Apr 12, 2010Oct 13, 2011Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sequenced packing element system
US20120006530 *Jul 6, 2010Jan 12, 2012Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Packing element system with profiled surface
EP1197632A2Oct 12, 2001Apr 17, 2002Greene, Tweed Of Delaware, Inc.Anti-extrusion ring
Classifications
U.S. Classification277/338, 166/134
International ClassificationE21B33/12, E21B33/128
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/128, E21B33/1216
European ClassificationE21B33/12F4, E21B33/128