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Publication numberUS3037212 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1962
Filing dateApr 19, 1960
Priority dateApr 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3037212 A, US 3037212A, US-A-3037212, US3037212 A, US3037212A
InventorsFerdinand Kleinhof
Original AssigneeFerdinand Kleinhof
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor connection for toilet bowls
US 3037212 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1962 F. KLElNHOF FLOOR CONNECTION FOR TOILET BOWLS Filed April 19, 1960 Hll...

United States Patent 3,037,212 FLOOR CONNECTION FOR TOILET BOWLS Ferdinand Kleinhof, Dorpsstraat 57, Diepenveen, Netherlands Filed Apr. 19, 1960, Ser. No. 23,264 Claims. (Cl. 4-252) The invention relates to a floor connection for a toilet bowl, and in particular to means for connecting the discharge pipe of a toilet bowl with a waste pipe.

In the conventional floor connection for toilet bowls, use is generally made of a leaden sleeve, in which the discharge pipe of the toilet bowl is inserted. A gasketing substance, such as hemp impregnated with bitumen, is applied between the inner surface of the sleeve and the outer surface of the discharge pipe. The top end of the sleeve is subjected on the spot to a deformation so as to obtain a flange to be supported by the floor. A peripheral base flange of the discharge pipe is placed upon said flange of the sleeve. The lower end of the sleeve is inserted in the enlarged end of the waste pipe, and the space between the inner surface of the same and the outer surface of the sleeve is filled with a gasketing substance, such as minium and tar.

This conventional floor connection is expensive, not only on account of the relatively high costs of the leaden sleeve, but also because several complicated operations are to be performed on the spot by a skilled plumber.

It is an object of the present invention to remove this disadvantage, and to provide a satisfactory floor connection for toilet bowls which makes use of inexpensive parts and may be assembled with a minimum of labor.

Another object of the invention is to provide a connection between the discharge pipe of a toilet bowl and a waste pipe, which is perfectly tight, so as to prevent the occurrence of leakages and odors, but nevertheless inexpensive and easy to assemble.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description, given with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which FIG. 1 shows a longitudinal section of a floor connection according to the invention for toilet bowls having a central discharge pipe.

FIG. 2 shows a longitudinal section of a modification of the sleeve used in the connection of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 shows, partially in elevation, and partially in a longitudinal section, a connection according to the invention for toilet bowls having a lateral discharge pipe.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of a part of the connection shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 shows a longitudinal section of a modification of the sleeve used in the connection of FIGS. 3 and 4.

According to a main feature of the present invention, use is made of an at least partially conical sleeve made of an elastic synthetic resin, such as polyethylene, of which the wide end encloses the discharge tube of the toilet bowl, and the narrow end is inserted in the waste pipe.

For toilet bowls provided with a central discharge pipe and with a base flange on said discharge pipe, use is preferably made of a sleeve having a peripheral flange with a depending edge, the flange of the sleeve being immediately supported by the floor, and the base flange of the discharge pipe being placed upon the flange of the sleeve.

For toilet bowls provided with a lateral discharge pipe, it is preferred to use a sleeve provided at its wide end with an inwardly directed flange enclosing the discharge pipe, and at its narrow end with an outwardly directed flange laid against the inner surface of the waste pipe.

Referring now to FIG. 1, the central discharge pipe of a toilet bowl is indicated at 1. A base flange 2 is pro- 3,037,212 Patented June 5, 1962 vided on the discharge pipe 1. A conical sleeve 3, made of an elastic synthetic resin, such as polyethylene, is provided at its wide end with a peripheral flange 4, having a depending edge 5. The flange *4 with its depending edge 5 is immediately supported by the floor 6. The narrow end of the sleeve 3 extends into the waste pipe 7, of which the top edge lies at the same level as the floor 6.

In assembling the connection, the toilet bowl is inserted with its discharge pipe 1 into the wide end of the sleeve 3, whereby a tight joint between the discharge pipe and the sleeve is obtained due to the elastic properties of the sleeve. In the final position of the toilet bowl, the base flange 2 exerts a pressure on the peripheral flange 4 of the sleeve, whereby the required joint with the floor 6 is obtained. If the flange 3 were completely flat, the tightness of the joint with the floor might be destroyed by an uneven surface of the floor. Due to the depending edge 5, however, a tight joint is warranted under any circumstances. It has been found in practice that no leakage occurs even when the waste pipe is completely clogged up.

The height of the conical sleeve 3 may amount to about 4 inches, while the inner diameter may amount to 4 inches at the narrow end and to 4.4 inches at the wide end. The flange 4 may have a width of about 1 inch, and the thickness of the wall of the sleeve may be about 0.08 inch.

In contrast with the conventional floor connections, the waste pipe 7 need not be provided with an enlarged end. Although a wooden floor has been shown in FIG. 1, the connection may also be used vw'th a concrete floor.

in the modification of the sleeve 3 shown in FIG. 2, an inwardy directed flange 8 is provided at the top end of the sleeve. This flange is adapted to enclose a discharge pipe having a smaller diameter than the top end of the sleeve with a sufficient resiliency to obtain a tight joint between the discharge pipe and the sleeve. Thus, it will be seen that the flange 8 allows for the use of the sleeve in combination with discharge pipes of varying diameter. The flange 8 may be secured to the sleeve by a heat sealing procedure. It is also possible, however, to attach the flange 8 to a separate annular disc having a depending edge, which is placed on the flange 4 so as to grip with its depending edge around the edge 5.

In FIGS. 3 and 4, the lateral discharge pipe of a toilet bowl is indicated at 9. FIG. 3 shows how this discharge pipe is connected with the bowl 10. A sleeve 11, consisting of two cylindrical sections and an intermediate conical section 12, and made of an elastic synthetic resin, such as polyethylene, is provided with an inwardly directed flange 13 at its wide top end, and with an outwardly directed flange 14 at its narrow lower end.

In assembling the connection, the sleeve 11 is first inserted with its narrow end in the waste pipe 7, so that the conical section 12 lies against the top edge of the waste pipe. The flange 14 impinges against the inner surface of the waste pipe so as to form a tight joint between the sleeve and the waste pipe. The discharge pipe 9 is now inserted in the wide end of the sleeve, in such manner that the thickened end 15 of the discharge pipe is pushed through the opening of the flange 13. The flange 13 impinges against the outer surface of the discharge pipe 9 so as to form a tight joint between the discharge pipe and the sleeve. The assembly only takes a few minutes.

In the modification of the sleeve 11 shown in FIG. 5, a resilient skirt 16 is attached to the sleeve at the border line between the upper cylindrical section and the conical section. The skilt 16 serves to cover the top edge of the waste pipe, and is particularly useful in cases Where the top edge of the waste pipe extends above the floor surface, which would otherwise lead to an untidy appearance.

Although the invention has been described hereinbefore by reference to some specific embodiments, it is to be understood that many modifications and alterations of these embodiments are possible with the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A connection at a floor for pipes having hollow cylindrical ends, the connection comprising: an elastic hollow sleeve including cylindrical end sections of difiering diameters, and a conical section connecting the end sections, the sleeve having a central axis, a first flange on the wide end directed inwardly towards the axis and a second flange on the narrow end directed outwardly away from the axis, the first flange being adapted for sealably engaging one of the pipes, the second flange being adapted for sealably engaging the other of the pipes, said conical portion sealably engaging said end of the other pipe, with said pipes in said end sections, to provide a seal between the end of the other pipe and said conical portion.

2. A connection as claimed in claim 1 further comprising resilient skirt means on the sleeve for covering the end of the other pipe.

3. In combination, a cylindrical discharge pipe, a cylindrical waste pipe coaxial with said discharge pipe, and an elastic sealing sleeve coaxial with said pipes and interconnecting the same in axially spaced relation, said sleeve comprising: a first end portion surrounding said discharge pipe and having an external diameter larger than the diameter of said waste pipe, an inwardly directed flange at said first end portion resiliently engaging said discharge pipe, a second end portion of smaller diameter than the first end portion and extending into said waste pipe with the first end portion surrounding said discharge pipe, an outwardly directed flange at said second end resiliently engaging said waste pipe, and a conical portion connecting said first end portion with said second end portion, said waste pipe having an end engaging the conical por- 4- tion, with the second end portion extending into said waste pipe.

4. A floor connection for a cylindrical discharge pipe and a cylindrical waste pipe coaxial with said discharge pipe, said connection comprising elastic sealing sleeve means coaxial with the said pipes and interconnecting the same at floor level in spaced axial relation, said sleeve means comprising: a first cylindrical portion adapted for surrounding said discharge pipe and having an external diameter larger than the internal diameter of said waste pipe, an inwardly directed flange at the free end of said first cylindrical portion for resiliently engaging the outer surface of said discharge pipe, a second cylindrical portion adapted to extend into said waste pipe with the first cylindrical portion surrounding said discharge pipe, an outwardly directed flange at the free end of said second cylindrical portion for resiliently engaging the inner surface of said waste pipe, and a conical portion interconnecting said cylindrical portions, said waste pipe having an end engaging the conical portion of the sleeve to provide a seal thereat with the second cylindrical portion extending into said waste pipe.

5. A connection as claimed in claim 4 comprising external resilient skirt means extending from the junction between said first cylindrical portion and said conical portion for covering said end of said waste pipe.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 748,418 Renton Dec, 29, 1903 1,514,065 OLeary Nov. 4, 1924 2,750,216 Thies June 12, 1956 2,976,543 Turner et a1. Mar. 28, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 858,523 Great Britain Jan. 11, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US748418 *Sep 30, 1903Dec 29, 1903Herbert S RentonFloor-joint for water-closets.
US1514065 *Mar 8, 1921Nov 4, 1924Leary Michael OSanitary closet connection
US2750216 *Dec 3, 1953Jun 12, 1956Thies Paul EBowl sleeve gasket
US2976543 *Jan 10, 1958Mar 28, 1961Debest Mfg Co IncGasket ferrule
GB858523A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3149346 *May 7, 1962Sep 22, 1964Springer Clarence AToilet unit
US3224014 *Dec 16, 1964Dec 21, 1965Pietrzak Henry SBowl gasket sleeve assembly
US3349412 *Mar 19, 1964Oct 31, 1967Best Mfg Co Inc DeGasket ferrule
US3419288 *Mar 27, 1967Dec 31, 1968Duane D. LogsdonStabilizer for polymer composition pipe
US3501172 *Nov 12, 1968Mar 17, 1970Pickard Robert BCloset assembly
US3680896 *Jul 22, 1969Aug 1, 1972Cupit George MToilet pan connector
US4171548 *Mar 20, 1978Oct 23, 1979Wilson Thomas AToilet
US5185890 *Sep 23, 1991Feb 16, 1993Dismore Gregory WToilet bowl sealing assembly
US5937450 *May 7, 1997Aug 17, 1999Jones-Stephens CorporationTo a drain pipe
US6719294Feb 2, 2001Apr 13, 2004Fluidmaster, Inc.Bathroom fixture gasket apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/252.1, 285/58
International ClassificationE03D11/00, E03D11/16
Cooperative ClassificationE03D11/16
European ClassificationE03D11/16