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Publication numberUS3037538 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1962
Filing dateJan 7, 1957
Priority dateJan 7, 1957
Publication numberUS 3037538 A, US 3037538A, US-A-3037538, US3037538 A, US3037538A
InventorsGraham Ernest J
Original AssigneeGraham Ernest J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for alining end portions of a log to a chucking device therefor
US 3037538 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1962 E. J. GRAHAM 3,037,538

DEVICE FOR ALINING END PORTIONS OF A LOG Jan. 7, 1957 A TTOE/VEV June 5, 1962 E. J; GRAHAM 3, 7,

' DEVICE FOR ALINING END PORTIONS OF A LOG TO A CHUCKING DEVICE THEREFOR Filed Jan. 7, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. -PA/EJZ cf GPA/MM June 5, 1962 E. J. GRAHAM 3,037,533

DEVICE FOR ALINING END PORTIONS OF A LOG TO A CHUCKING DEVICE THEREFOR Filed Jan. 7, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 z 4m! 1 Q 82 INVENTOR. ERA/57 J. GPA/MM June 5, 1962 E. J. GRAHAM 3,037,538

DEVICE FOR ALINING END PORTIONS OF A LOG TO A CHUCKING DEVICE THEREFOR 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jan. 7, 1957 INVENTOR.

A TI'OE/VEVS E. J. GRAHAM 3,037,538 DEvIcE FOR ALINING END PORTIONS OF A LOG TO A CHUCKING DEVICE THEREFOR 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 June 5, 1962 Filed Jan. 7, 1957 INVENTOR. ERNEST 1/.' GRAHAM Uited My invention relates to the art of precentering the end portion of a log at a definite location so that the log thereafter may be moved a predetermined amount to a final centered position, such as the lathe employed in peeling a log to provide wood veneer sheets.

The prior art in centering logs to be chucked in the making of wood veneer involved measuring the end portions of logs to calculate the desired center. This prior art practice was not only inaccurate but was time consuming and therefore expensive.

An object of my invention is to provide illuminating means which are focused to accurately be intercepted by the end portion of a log when said end portion of a log is in a predetermined position and which predetermined position of the log has a definite distance relationship to the lathe in which the log is to be chucked so that after precentering of a log, the log may be moved by suitable means a predetermined amount and thus will be finally centered after such travel.

Another object of my invention is to provide structure which readily permits scaling of a log visually as distinguished from securing a log scale by measurements.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent as the description of the same proceeds and the invention will be best understood from a consideration of the following detailed descriptions taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part of the specification, with the understanding, however, that the invention is not to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described since obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in this art.

FIGURE 1 is a plan view, and with parts broken away, of a construction illustrating my invention;

FIG. 2 is a view in elevation illustrating a pattern projected against one end portion of a log;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 of an alternative pattern projected against the end portion of a log;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view illustrating one form of my invention;

FIG, 5 is a fragmentary view taken substantially on broken line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an alternative form of my invention and showing an alternative log precentering means which may be used in connection with the lathe shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing a still further alternative form of my invention;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 and showing a still further alternate form of my invention; and

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 and showing a still further modified form of my invention.

In FIG. 1 of the drawings, a usual transfer means for transferring logs sideways is illustrated by an endless driven chain conveyor 10, which preferably carries log engaging cleats 12. The conveyor 10 will deliver logs, as peeler logs, to a log centering mechanism, as a cradle having spaced yokes 14 and 16 (shown dotted in FIG. 1) and explained more in detail in connection with FIG. 4. As the logs are delivered sequentially one at a time to yokes 14 and 16, appropriate stop and start mechanism is provided in connection with the chain conveyor 10.

When a log is supported by the yokes 14 and 16 the log may have both end portions thereof moved vertically or horizontally so as to aline the log with fixed mechanisms for centering a log which will next be described.

"atent The construction employed in centering a log comprises projectors 18 and 20, and each of the projectors 18 and 20 fixed relatively to and focused against a predetermined location or area when in operation. The projectors 18 and 20 are provided with suitable illumination and screen means to project a pattern and the pattern is focused so that the end portion 22 of a log 24 can be alined and in proper focus with a pattern transmitted by a projector 18 and the end portion 26 of said log 24 may be alined to receive a pattern from the projector 20. The means for moving the end portions 22 and 26 of the log 24 will be later discussed and the pattern to be projected by the projectors 18 and 20 are illustrated by the concentric patterns shown on FIGS. '2 and 3 of the drawings. In utilizing my invention, I provide fixed concentric patterns which are projected from illuminated projector having a suitable film or screen therein and then move the end portions 22 and 26 of a log 24 so that the patterns which emanate from fixed sources are properly alined and focused on the said end portions of the log 24, An operator of the mechanism located at 28 of FIG. 1 is disposed so that he can manipulate proper controls for moving the log 24 and at the same time directly see the pattern projected on the end portion 22 of the log 24 and indirectly see the pattern projected on the end portion 26 of the log 24 by way of a mirror 30 alined to be visible to the operator when he is positioned as indicated.

In the showing of FIG. 1 of the drawings, the end portions 22 and 26 of a log 24 are alined with projected patterns from projectors l8 and 2G and the end portions 22 and 26 have been moved both vertically and horizontally so that the log is centered at a place remote from a lathe 32 and thereafter the log 24 is moved to a position predetermined by the position of the chucks 34 of the lathe 32 so that the predetermined location of the end portions of the log 24 as manipulated because of the projected beams from the projectors 18 and 20 is such that the log may be precentered at one location and then moved to the position predetermined by the position of the chucks 34 of the lathe 32, and the centering maintained. In connection with lathe 32, I have diagrammatically shown a fragment of the usual log peeling means 33.

Now referring to FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, typical patterns to be projected by the projectors 18 and 20 onto the end portions 22 and 26 of a log 24 may include the concentric circles as is illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings. While the concentric circles 36, in FIG. 2, are shown as varying -by one inch in diameter from nine to fourteen inches, inclusive; by two inches when varying from fourteen to twenty-two inches,.inclusive; four inches when varying from twenty-two to thirty inches inclusive; and six inches when varying from thirty to sixty inches inclusive, this is to be understood as illustrative and not as a limitation. The reason 'I prefer to vary the larger amounts in the diameters of the larger circles is that this is consistent with the scope of vision of operators which I have encountered operating devices embodying my invention. In other words, with larger circles, it is desirable that the circles be farther apart so that the eyes of an operator can readily follow a complete circle so as to eliminate any tendency of the eyes of the operator to jump from one circle to another.

In connection with *FIG. 3 of the drawings, I have shown concentric patterns, such as concentric polygons.

38, and each of the individual polygons 38 may vary in its distance from a common center similarly to the circles 36' of FIG. 2 and bear similar dimension notations. While I have illustrated full line circles and full line polygons in FIGS. 2 and 3, I have also found that broken lines are also useful in connection with my invention. By having a concentric pattern it is easy for an operator to move the end portion of a log 24 so that a log is precentered or initially centered to obtain the greatest recovery of veneer from a log after the same has been chucked in a lathe 32 or to precenter or initially center such a log to permit the log to be chucked at the center of its grain growth. The grain growth center of a log, such as a Douglas Fir log, and the center to obtain maximum recovery of veneer sheets peeled from the log will not necessarily be the same and generally are not the same. One school of thought, which is presently in the minority, claims that the log should be chucked at the center of its grain growth so that the veneer sheets which are peeled from such a log will have the largest amount of uninterrupted layers of hard fibers. The other school of thought, now in the majority, claims that the desirable manner of chucking a log in a lathe where the log is to be peeled to form veneer sheets to be made into plywood, is to chuck the log in a way to permit maximum recovery of veneer sheets regardless of the grain growth center.

Preferably in addition to concentric patterns being projected by the projectors 18 and 20 onto the end portions 22 and 26 of the log 24 are intersecting radial crosslines 40 and 42 which aid in the visual rough determination of either the grain center or the greatest recovery center and aid in the fine determination of the grain center. Also preferably the diameter indicated by each of the concentric patterns 36 or 38 is suitably visually shown to indicate information permitting an accurate log scale of log 24. Fragment of means which may be utilized to manipulate the end portions 22 and 26 of the log 24 are shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 of the drawings, such as by the fragments of jaws 44 and the yokes 14 and 16.

Assuming that an end portion of a log is as illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings, then the circle bearing the notation 54 will be the last complete circle and the circle 60 will only be fragmentarily shown and thus the center of the concentric circles will be the center where it is desired to chuck the log 24 to obtain the maximum recovery of veneer from the said log obtained by a turning process. I have shown a similar log in FIG. 3 of the drawings having projected thereon concentric polygons and the same center for chucking is determined by the concentric polygons as was obtained in connection with FIG. 2 of the drawings.

Referring now to FIG. 4 of the drawings, one means is illustrated for moving a log 24 so that the end portion 26 thereof is alined with the projected pattern from a projector 20. The yokes 14 and 16 (see also FIG. 1) are each moved by a similar apparatus and hence only the apparatus for moving the yoke 16 is illustrated. This comprises a hydraulic piston and cylinder means 46. Rod 48 connects between the yoke 16 and one part of the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 46, as the movable piston thereof. The other of said means 46, as the cylinder, is pivoted by pivot means 50 to a carriage member 52 and the carriage member 52 is mounted on wheels 54 which in turn are mounted on tracks 56. The purpose of wheels 54 and tracks 56' is to move carriage 52 and a log carried thereby endwise in case the log is transferred by the conveyor with the end portions 22 and 26 outside the reach of jaws 44.

One end portion of a hydraulic piston and cylinder means 58, as the cylinder means thereof, is pivotally connected by pivot means 59 to the carriage member 52 and the other end thereof, as rod 60, is connected by pivot means 62 with the cylinder of hydraulic and piston means 46. Thus by appropriate operation of the piston and cylinder means 58, the rod 48 may be angularly moved as respects the pivot means 50 and by vertical movement of said rod 48, as respects the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 46, the vertical position of the yoke 16 may be manipulated. Thus both horizontal and vertical adjustments may be made relative to the position of the yoke 16 which in turn moves the end portion 26 relative to the pattern projected thereon by the projector 20. As previously indicated, similar mechanism obtains for moving the end portion 22 relative to the projected pattern from the projector 18.

In FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, a construction is illustrated so that a log 24 is arcuately moved and in a definite amount from a precentered position shown by full lines to the left to the final position shown by dot and dash lines to the right-in the last mentioned position, the log 24 has been chucked in the lathe 32.

A fixed overhead frame structure 64 pivotally supports an arm 66 on pivot means 68. While a single means may be employed to angularly move arms 66, l have illustrated a separate means for moving each arm 66. Thus the means, for angularly moving an arm 66 and parts carried thereby, comprises a piston and cylinder means '70 and a rod 72 connected with the cylinder means of said piston and cylinder means 70. In the various power mechanisms illustrated herein involving hydraulic piston and cylinder means either part may be the stationary part and the other the movable part. Thus the arrangements shown are by way of illustration only. Rod 72 has its outer end portion pivotally connected to the arm 66 by pivot means 74. The cylinder of piston and cylinder means 76 is pivotally secured to said fixed support 64 by pivot means 73. Maximum retractile movement of the arm 66 about the pivot means 68 is determined by adjustable stop means 76 and maximum forward angular movement of said arm 66 is limited by adjustable stop means 78-each of said stop means 76 and 78 being carried by suitable projections on the fixed overhead support 64. The stop means 76 and 78 and their counterparts in succeeding figures are only diagrammatically shown. The said stops must also be interconnected with the hydraulic means to relieve pressure after the said stops are engaged-however such details are not claimed herein and thus not specifically shown. The arm 66 pivotally carries an extension thereof 80 by pivot means 82. The extension 80 fixedly carries a piston and cylinder means 84 and the piston of said piston and cylinder means 84 is connected with a rod 86 and the rod 86 carries a jaw 44.

By way of illustration in FIGS. 4 and 5, I have illustrated hydraulic means employing pistons and cylinders as actuating devices for various parts as the same are expedients commonly employed in plywood plants. However, lead screws and other appropriate driving means can readily be used and it is therefore to be understood that the illustration of hydraulic means is for purposes of illustration only and not for purposes of limitation. While only one jaw 44 and operating mechanism therefore is illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, the counterparts for manipulating the end portion 22 of a log 24 will be readily understood and visualized.

Referring now to FIG. 5 of the drawings, the pivoting of the extension 80, about pivot means 82, may be accomplished by piston and cylinder means 88 having the piston portion thereof connected to a rod 90 and having the cylinder portion thereof connected to a rod 92. The rods 90 and 92 pivotally interconnect between laterally spaced apart extensions 80 (one used in connection with each jaw 44) so that the jaws 44 may be moved relatively away from each other to permit the same to span a log and then moving the jaws toward each other to permit the said jaws 44 to engage and support a log 24 as the log is being manipulated so that the logs will be pre-centered as indicated in connection with the showing at the left of FIG. 4- 0f the drawings. The amount of movement relatively of said jaws 44 away from each other will be sufiicient in substantially all instances to permit the engaging of a log (having a length within the range of the mechanism) resting on yokes 14 and 16 but in the event there is not sufficient relative movement for a relatively misplaced log, then the carriage member ,52 may be moved lengthwise because of wheels 5 54 and tracks 56 to place a log 24 longitudinally within the limits of separating movement of the jaws 44.

In connection with the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 46 of FIG. 4, I have indicated conduits 94 and 96 as indicative of a source of fluid under pressure to be delivered to either end of the piston of hydraulic piston and cylinder means 46 so that it may be urged in either direction as controlled by solenoid control valve means 98. Similarly in connection with piston and cylinder means 58, I have shown conduits 100 and 102 and solenoid control valve 104 for moving and controlling the travel of the piston of piston and cylinder means 58. Similar constructions are illustrated in connection respectively with piston and cylinder means 70, piston and cylinder means 84, and piston and cylinder means 88 by: conduits 106 and 168 and solenoid control valve 110 for piston and cylinder means 70; conduits 112 and 114 and solenoid control valve 116 for piston and cylinder means 84; conduits 118 and 120 and solenoid control valve 122 for piston and cylinder means 88. It is believed that the showing of the control mechanism including parts 94 to 122 inclusive will be sufiicient for those skilled in this art and particularly so in view of the fact that no details of such constructions are claimed herein. The reason for remote control mechanism is so that an operator positioned at Station 23 will be able to manipulate the various mechanisms involved from a remote location and at a time when the operator is directly and indirectly observing a concentric pattern, as the pattern 36 or the pattern 38, disposed on the end portions 22 or 26 of the In connection with FIGS. 4 and of the drawings, the manipulation of the end portions 22 and 26 of the log 24, to precenter each of the same on a fixed concentric pattern, was obtained by structure disposed below the log 24 and which structure comprised piston and cylinder means 46 and 58. The movement obtained by the piston and cylinder means 84 is utilized to accommodate logs of different diameters so that the jaws 44 may engage such logs. Obviously the precentering of a log resting on yokes 14 and 16 will always center the log about a given predetermined center but to engage a log 24 by jaws 44 and adjacent the periphery thereof will require the movement obtaining by reason of the piston and cylinder means 84. In connection with FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, I have shown the same arcuate movement in moving a log from its precentered position to its position in the lathe 32 where all of the manipulation was obtained by means disposed below the log 24 and in connection with FIG. 6 of the drawings, I have illustrated means for manipulating the end portions 22 and 26 of a log 24 by means disposed above the said log 24 prior to the arcuate movement obtained by operation of piston and cylinder means 70.

Now referring to FIG. 6 of the drawings, parts having similar numbers to the parts numbered in connection with FIGS. 4 and 5 are given similar numbers and are incorporated by reference without repetition. In addition, the extension 123 of arm 66 is somewhat modified as respects extension 80 and is shortened and is pivotally connected by pivot means 124 to an extension 126 of the member 123. Arms 128 are spaced apart and connect with extension 123 and the arms 128 are disposed on opposite sides of the extension 126.

A piston and cylinder means 130 is carried by one of the arms 128 and a link 13 2 is connected with the piston of said piston and cylinder means 130 and is also pivotally connected by pivot means 134 with the extension 126. Conduits 136 and 138 and solenoid control valve 140 function in combination with the pistons and cylinder means 130 so as to provide for relative angular movement between extension 126 and the arms 1 28 thus providing for one component in precentering a log carried by the jaws 44 and the piston and cylinder means 84 will provide for the other component and thus all necessary 6 adjustment to precenter a log where the equipment is positioned above the log as is illustrated in connection with FIG. 6 of the drawings. The same arcuate travel from a precentered position to the final centered position is illustrated by the dot and dash lines and arrows numbered 141 in FIGS. 4 and 6.

FIGS. 4 and 5 and FIG. 6 thus indicate precentering of a log at one location and then arcuately moving the log to its final centered position in the chucks 34 of a lathe 32. This is true whether or not the manipulation for precentering is either from above or below the log. In subsequent figures, I will indicate either horizontal or vertical movement of a log from its precentered position to its final centered position and in the interest of brevity I will not show constructions, in connection therewith, to precenter from both above and below the log as it is deemed such is not necessary to define the invention within the scope of the appended claims. However, it is to be understood that in connection with the showing in subsequent figures that they are to be considered as illustrative and not as limitations.

In FIG. 7 of the drawings, only parts indicating additional apparatus will be numbered and described and parts having similar functions to those previously described will bear the same numbers as previously and will be incorporated by reference and without detailed explanation.

Referring now to FIG. 7 of the drawings, the apparatus below log 24 to precenter the same may be the same as illustrated in connection with FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings and hence the same showing and the same figure numbers will appear. Regardless of the manner in which the log is precentered in connection with FIG. 7 of the drawings, after percentering the same is supported by jaws 4'4 and the jaws 44 are movable toward and away from each other on pivot means 82 and associated parts similar to the showing in connection with the top of FIG. 4 of the drawings. Instead of providing an arouately mounted arm 66 as in connection with said FIG. 4, I employ in arm 142 which'is supported by carriage 143 and the latter is threadedly secured to a lead screw 144 and the lead screw 144 is movable in the desired direction by reversible motor 146. The controls for the reversible motor 146 are such that said motor may be driven the desired number of revolutions in either direction and come to a quick stop position in either direction after the desired number of revolutions so that a log precentered above the carriage member 52 may be moved sidewise and horizontally along dot, dash and arrow line 147 to the final centering position relative to the lathe 32. The purpose of the showing in FIG. 7 of the drawings is to indicate that other movements than an arcuate movement, such as a horizontal movement, may be employed in moving a log from a precentered position to a final centered position and the amount and extent of the movement may be predetermined or that the final position may be predetermined. In connection with FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 of the drawings, stops 78 were adjustable so that the end of the travel of the log in an arcuate path was predetermined while in connection with FIG. 7 of the drawings, the adjustable stops are indicated. Also in FIG. 7 and as indicative of a variation a driven and reversible lead screw was illustrated rather than hydraulic piston and cylinder means.

Now, referring to FIG. 8 of the drawings, another modification is indicated wherein the movement from the precentered position to the final centered position is a vertical travel. Thus as illustrative, the travel so indicated in FIG. 8 of the drawings is downward in a vertical direction from the precentered to the final centered position and different typical means for precentering the log is illustrated. Obviously various combinations of the various views may be used to the end of accomplishing the desired precenterin-g before the travel of the log from the predetermined precentered position to the final centered position.

A log 24 is delivered from a conveyor onto laterally spaced apart V-shaped log supporting means 148 and each of the log supporting means 148 is connected with a rod 158. Each of the rods 150 is connected with a hydraulic piston and cylinder means 152, as to the cylinder thereof. The other of said piston and cylinder means 152, as the piston thereof, is connected to a rod 154. The rod 154 is pivoted by pivot means 156 to the carriage 158. Operating means for the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 152 comprises conduits 160 and solenoid valve 162. Wheels 164- and tracks 166 make the carriage 158 mobile.

The means for moving the carriage 158 from the full line position shown in FIG. 8 to the dash line position and in return to the full line position may comprise the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 168 having the piston means thereof pivotally connected by pivot means 170 to the carriage 158 and having the cylinder means pivotally connected by pivot means 172 to a fixed support 174. The means for controlling said hydraulic piston and cylinder means 168 may include conduits 176 and solenoid control valve 178.

By operation of the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 168, the carriage 158 and the V-shaped log supporting means 148 may be moved together toward the right as viewed in FIG. 8 of the drawings. By operation of the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 152, the V-shaped log supporting means 148 connected with a particular hydraulic piston and cylinder means 152 may be moved independent of the movement of the carriage 158. If the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 168 is eliminated, then the mass of the carriage 158 must be increased to prevent the same from being over-balanced by a log 24 resting on V-shaped log supporting means 148. Either by travel of the carriage 158 or by travel of the V-shaped log supporting means 148 independent of the carriage 158, a log 24 may be moved the desired amount generally horizontally to the predetermined precentered position indicated by the dash line representation 180 of the log 24,

In order to provide a vertical component to precenter a log in the position 180, I provide hydraulic piston and cylinder means 182 pivotally connected by pivots 184 and 186 between the carriage 158 and the rod 154. The actuating means for the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 182 may comprise conduits 188 and solenoid control valve 190.

Thus hydraulic piston and cylinder means 182 will angularly move rod 154 about pivot means 156 and thus provide a vertical component in the travel of a log 24 to a predetermined centered position represented by the dash line figure 180 in FIG. 8.

In the mode of operation of the structure illustrated in FIG. 8 of the drawings, a log is precentered at the position indicated by the dash line 188 and thereafter the log travels vertically, as downwardly, along dash line 181 to the full line position where it is supported by the lathe 32. The means for controlling a predetermined vertical travel includes the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 192 in said FIG. 8. In order that the jaws 44 may be moved vertically to engage the periphery of a log 24 regardless of its diameter, the parts 64, 80, 82, 84, 86, 88, 112, 114, and 116 are illustrated and which parts have the same functions as the parts bearing the same numbers and described in connection with previous figures. Each extension 80 carries guides 194 and the guides 194 slidably support the cylinder of piston and cylinder means 192 and the piston thereof is connected with a jaw 44. The means to provide a predetermined travel of the piston of hydraulic piston and cylinder means 192 relative to the cylinder thereof may comprise conduits 196 and solenoid control valve 198.

In connection with FIG. 8 of the drawings, a log is moved and has its end portions centered as indicated by the dash line position 180. Then the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 84 is operated so that the jaws 44 will engage a log and maintain the same in the precentered position 188. Then the V-shaped log supporting means 148 are retracted from the dash line position of FIG. 8 to the full line position of FIG. 8 and with the log supported in the position 188 by the jaws 44- and parts connected therewith. Next the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 192 are operated to provide for a predetermined vertical travel so that the log moves from the precentered position shown by 188 to the dot and dash line position where the log is finally centered and chucked in the lathe 32.

Now, referring to FIG. 9 of the drawings, another modification is indicated wherein the movement from the precentered position to the final centered position is horizontal. The structure shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings is substantially the same as the structure shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings, with the general exceptions that the log travels horizontally from the precentered position to the final centered position in the chucks of lathe 32 and means are provided so that the carriage 158 will have a predetermined horizontal travel. Similar parts in FIG. 9 to those of FIG. 8 are given the same numbers.

In operating the structure of FIG. 9, a log 24 is delivered from the chain conveyor 10 onto the V-shaped log supporting members 148 and then by operation of the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 152 and 182 a log 24 is moved to the dash line centered position 200 and all of the movement necessary for such precentering is obtained by operation of the said hydraulic piston and cylinder means 152 and 182. After a log has been so precentered at the position 200, then the carriage 158 may be caused to travel a predetermined distance in a horizontal direction to move a log from the precentered position 200 along the axis 282 until the log is centered in the chucks of the lathe 32.

The structure and mode of operation indicated in connection with FIG. 9 of the drawings is useful where there is suflicient clearance below a log in a lathe 32 to permit withdrawal of the V-shaped log supporting means 148 after a long has been chucked in a lathe 32.

Stating the matter a different way, the structure of FIG. 8 may be employed to operate in the manner indicated in connection with FIG. 9 of the drawings Wherever the size of the log and the clearance below the log in the lathe 32 is such that the V-shaped log supporting means 148 can be withdrawn after a long has been chucked in a lathe 32. If there is not sutficient clearance because of the size of the log or because of the clearance inherent in the lathe 32, then the hydraulic piston and cylinder means 192 of FIG. 8 useful to provide a predetermined vertical travel so that the log can be centered before said predetermined vertical travel and if the clearances are appropriate, then the predetermined travel may be horizontally along the axis 202 as indicated in connection with FIG. 9 of the drawings.

From the foregoing illustrations and descriptions there of, it will now become apparent that I have provided apparatus for precentering a log at a location remote from the jaws of the lathe where a log is to be finally centered and each end portion of the log is precentered by moving such end portion into the area of a projected concentric pattern. The projected concentric pattern not only provides for precentering of a log but provides for sealing a log. After the precentering, the predetermined travel of the log may be in various planes or combination thereof. The projectors 18 and 28 are focused so that if the end portion of a long intercepts the pattern at a predetermined second location, which is a relatively fixed location relative to the first location of a log chucking device, that the patterns 36 and 38 can be used to accurately scale a log and there will be a predetermined distance to the said first position of the chucking device.

In connection with FIG. 1, 4-5, 6, 7, and 8, a log is suspended by jaws 44 which are pivotally supported on pivots 82 and thus each log will tend to center itself lengthwise and at a predetermined distance away from each of the projectors 18 and 20. Thus the projectors 18 and 20 will project a precise pattern such as the pattern shown in either FIG. 2 or that shown in FIG. 3 against the end portion of a log and the pattern can be readily calibrated so that the insignia on the lines 36 or 38 will accurately define the diameter of a log. In View of the fact that the logs are cut to fit in a lathe 32, we thus have the length of the log as well as the diameter and obviously a log scale can be readily read by the use of my invention.

It will now appear that the log cannot be precentered unless there first exists a definite geometrical relationship between the concentric patterns and the chucking centers. Specifically it appears that the chucking center axis (an imaginary straight line joining the lathe chucks) and the concentric pattern axis (a similar imaginary line passing through the centers of each pattern) mus-t first be parallel to each other before a log can be said to be precentered after being alined with the pattern. Only when such a relationship exists can the log moving means move the log the predetermined distance between the second and first location so that it comes to rest precisely between the chuck lathes. Also when a log is precentered at a desired location, the log axis center and the concentric pattern axis will be the same.

Obviously changes may be made in the forms, dimensions and arrangement of the parts of my invention without departing from the principle thereof, the above setting forth only preferred forms of embodiment of my invention.

I claim:

1. A device for alining the opposite end portions of a log to the laterally spaced jaws of a chucking device therefor, and which chucking device is relatively fixed at a first location thereby determining a fixed chucking center axis of the chucking device, comprising illuminated projectors for projecting late-rally spaced concentric patterns which comprise concentric circles which are centered about an axis which is parallel to the chucking center axis and which patterns are focused to be accurately intercepted respectively by opposite end portions of the log positioned at a second location and which second location is spaced a predetermined distance relative to said first location and said second location having a concentric pattern axis which is parallel to said chucking center axis; log moving means for moving the respective end portions of the log into selected visible alinement with the concentric patterns at said second location and thereby alining a selected log axis with the concentric pattern axis; and means to move the log the predetermined distance from the second location to the first location and to maintain said selected log axis parallel to said chucking center axis during moving.

2. A device for alining the opposite end portions of a log to the laterally spaced jaws of a chucking device therefor, and which chucking device is relatively fixed at a first location thereby determining a fixed chucking center axis of the chucking device, comprising illuminated projectors for projecting laterally spaced concentric patterns which comprise concentric polygons which are centered about an axis which is parallel to the chucking center axis and which patterns are focused to be accurately intercepted respectively by opposite end portions of the log positioned at a second location and which second location is spaced a predetermined distance relative to said first location and said second location having a concentric pattern axis which is parallel to said chucking center axis; log moving means for moving the respective end portions of the log into selected visible alinement with the concentric patterns at said second location and thereby alining a selected log axis with the concentric pattern axis; and means to move the log the predetermined distance from the second location to the first location and to maintain said selected log axis parallel to said chucking center axis during moving.

3. A device for alining the opposite end portions of a log to the laterally spaced jaws of a chucking device therefor, and which chucking device is relatively fixed at a first location thereby determining a fixed chucking center axis of the chucking device, comprising illuminated projectors for projecting laterally spaced concentric patterns which patterns are intersected by lines crossing the center thereof and which patterns are centered about an axis which is parallel to the chucking center axis and which patterns are focused to be accurately intercepted respectively by opposite end portions of the log positioned at a second location and which second location is spaced a predetermined distance relative to said first location and said second location having a concentric pattern axis which is parallel to said chucking center axis; log moving means for moving the respective end portions of the log into selected visible alinement with the concentric patterns at said second location and thereby alining a selected log axis with the concentric pattern axis; and means to move the log the predetermined distance from the second location to the first location and to maintain said selected log axis parallel to said chucking center axis during moving.

4. A device for alining the opposite end portions of a log to the laterally spaced jaws of a chucking device therefor, and which chucking device is relatively fixed at a first location thereby determining a fixed chucking center axis of the chucking device, comprising illuminated projectors for projecting laterally spaced concentn'c patterns centered about an axis which is parallel to the chucking center axis and which patterns are focused to be accurately intercepted respectively by opposite end portions of the log positioned at a second location and which second location is spaced a predetermined distance relative to said first location and said second location having a concentric pattern axis which is parallel to said chucking center axis; log moving means for moving the respective end portions of the log into selected visible alinement with the concentric patterns at said second location and thereby alining a selected log axis with the concentric pattern axis; means to move the log the predetermined distance from the second location to the first location and to maintain said selected log axis parallel to said chucking center axis during moving; and reflector means making both of the concentric patterns visible from a predetermined operators position.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein controls for said log moving means for moving the end portions thereof are operable from said operators predetermined position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 709,627 Diggins Sept. 23, 1902 1,700,511 Page Jan. 29, 1929 1,804,764 Grant May 12, 1931 2,352,885 Bukowsky July 4, 1944 2,425,750 McCarty Aug. 19, 1947 2,453,947 Swift Nov. 16, 1948 2,523,563 Foreman Sept. 26, 1950 2,931,403 Parker Apr. 5, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 218,457 Great Britain July 10, 1924 431,120 Great Britain July 1, 1935 OTHER REFERENCES Tooling Up By Telescope, pages to 123 of Fortune, Oct. 1951.

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US3129733 *Feb 5, 1962Apr 21, 1964Terrell Mach CoMachine for forming a cylindrical billet with a plane surface substantially parallelto the billet axis
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Classifications
U.S. Classification144/215.2, 144/209.1, 901/37, 901/14, 901/22, 901/13
International ClassificationB27L5/02, B27L5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27L5/022
European ClassificationB27L5/02B