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Publication numberUS3037797 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1962
Filing dateOct 23, 1958
Priority dateOct 23, 1958
Publication numberUS 3037797 A, US 3037797A, US-A-3037797, US3037797 A, US3037797A
InventorsCicero C Brown
Original AssigneeCicero C Brown
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coupling devices
US 3037797 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1962 c. c. BROWN COUPLING DEVICES 4 Sheets+Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 23, 1958 z. W. QM" 0R. 5 m w w i m J A aw r. J; EM 7 Q.b Ma 23333 5 6 A oz 3 9 o B .v 4/4 1 a k /77// v W. 7 4 m l 22 66 June 5, 1962 Filed Oct. 25, 1958 C. C. BROWN COUPLING DEVICES 26- Z/a/J 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 III;

CICERO C. BROWN I INVENTOR. d B

June 5, 1962 c. 0. BROWN 3,037,797

COUPLING DEVICES Filed Oct. 23, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet s ATTORNE Y5 June 5, 1962 c. c. BROWN COUPLING DEVICES 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Oct. 25, 1953 373 0 2 RUB 15a III- I 15a I I5: I 13 CICERO c. BROWN INVENTOR ATTORNEYS 3,037,797 COUPLING DEVICES Cicero C. Brown, 8490 Katy Road, Houston, Tex. Filed Oct. 23, 1958, Ser. No. 769,188 9 Claims. (U. 285-18) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in coupling devices.

In various types of well apparatus, it is desirable to couple or latch a tubular conductor to a particular tool or to another conductor and to subsequently effect a release of said connection. For example, in multiple well production apparatus, a number of tubing strings are run into the well independently of each other and as each string is finally landed, its lower end is connected or coupled to a well packer or other tool; when subsequent removal is necessary, the coupling must, of course, be releasable. Since well tubing strings extend for considerable distances in the order of thousands of feet, it is of advantage if the coupling is engageable and disengageable by a straight longitudinal movement of the conductor and without the necessity of rotating or otherwise manipulating said conductor.

One type of satisfactory coupling device is illustrated in the co-pending application of C.C. Brown and C. B. Cochran, Serial No. 756,552, filed August 22, 1958. In such device, a predetermined upward pull on the conductor will effect a release of the coupled elements and although the invention of said application has been found entirely satisfactory in use, there are certain instances, particularly in the deeper wells involving long tubing strings, where shrinkage or drawing up of the tubing may apply sufficient force to the device to effect an unintentional disconnection of the coupling.

It is, therefore, one object of this invention to provide an improved coupling device having all of the advantages of the device disclosed in said co-pending application but in addition having a positive locking feature which prevents unintentional disconnection from any cause.

An important object is to provide an improved coupling device which may be engaged and disengaged by straight line movement and which is so constructed that any pressure which acts in a direction tending to separate the members of the device is utilized to maintain said members in coupled position.

A further object is to provide a coupling device, of the character described, wherein a locking element, preferably in the form of a movable mandrel or sleeve, is associated with the latching members of the device in such manner that said element positively prevents disengagement or release of said latching members until said element is actuated, whereby premature or unintentional disconnection of the coupling device is impossible.

Another object is to provide a coupling device, of the character described, wherein the locking element which controls the latching members and the positions to which said members may move may be automatically moved into locking position by mechanical means when the members of said device move into connected position; or said element may be moved by mechanical or hydraulic means controlled from the surface. The invention contemplating movement of said locking element from its loci-ring position by either hydraulic or mechanical means as desired.

The construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features thereof.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference dfififlh? Patented June 5, 1952 wherein an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a view, partly in section and partly in elevation, of a coupling device constructed in accordance with the invention and illustrating the coupling elements moving toward a coupled position;

FIGURE 2 is a similar view with the locking element or sleeve of the device moved into its locking position;

FIGURE 3 is a similar View showing the members of the coupling device in fully coupled position and illustrating the manner in which pressure, which may tend to separate the device, acts to maintain the parts in such coupled position;

FIGURE 4 is a View similar to FIGURE 3 and showing the relationship of the locking element or sleeve of the device whereby uncoupling of the parts may be effected;

FIGURE 5 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 55 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 7 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation of a modified form of the coupling device illustrating the parts moving toward a coupled position;

FIGURE 8 is a similar view illustrating the parts in coupled position;

FIGURE 9 is a view, partly in section and partly in elevation, of still another form of the invention showing the parts moving toward a coupled position;

FIGURE 10 is a similar view showing the parts in fully coupled position.

FIGURE 11 is a schematic view of a wire line tool which may be employed to effect release of the modification shown in FIGURES 9 and 10; and

FIGURE 12 is a schematic view of a well bore having packers and multiple tubing strings to be located therein and showing one use of the improved coupling device. In the drawings (FIGURES 1 to 4), the letter A designates an outer coupling member which may take the form of a housing or casing having a longitudinal bore extending therethrough. An annular locking recess 11 is formed within the bore and said recess is defined by a straight wall section 11a, an upper annular beveled surface 12 and a lower annular beveled surface 13. An

to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof,

inclined guide surface 14 is preferably formed at the upper end of the outer housing A.

An inner member generally indicated by the letter B is insertable within bore 10 of the outer housing member and, as will be explained, is adapted to'be moved into a coupled or connected position by a straight-line movement of the inner member 13 longitudinally with respect to the outer member A. When in a coupled position (FIGURE 3), latching members or dogs 15 are maintained within the locking recess by a locking element or sleeve 26 and when said element is in its locking position, the latching elements cannot be displaced from the looking recess whereby the members A and B are retained in coupled position. 7

As will be explained in detail, the locking element or sleeve 26 may be selectively moved so as to release the latching members or dogs 15 whereby the inner member may be disconnected from the outer member by a straightline longitudinal movement. Thus, the coupling device provides inner and outer members whichmay be con nected by a straight-line longitudinal movement of the inner member relative to the outer member and said members may be positively locked againstdisengagement. The locking element 26 may be selectively actuated to permit retraction of the latching members or dogs and separation is effected by a straight-line longitudinal movement of the members relative to each other.

As is clearly shown in FIGURES 1 to'4, the inner memher B comprises a tubular body 17 having its upper end connected through an elongate connecting sub 18 with a pipe or conductor 19. The sub has suitable packing means 20 mounted on its external surface and such packing means is adapted to seal with the bore of the outer housing member A when the members are in connected position.

The body 17 has its upper end connected with the lower end of the sub 18 and is tubular in cross-section. A collar 21 having an external diameter substantially equal to the external diameter of the lower portion of the body is threaded into said body and, in effect, forms the lower end thereof. The central portion of the body is formed with an annular enlarged portion and a plurality of slots 22 are cut through the Wall of the body to divide the enlarged annular portion into a plurality of latching members or dogs 15. Each latching member or dog includes a substantially flat outer surface a, an upper beveled shoulder 15b and a lower beveled shoulder 15c; the shoulders of the latching dogs are adapted to co-act with the beveled surfaces 12 and 13 of the locking recess ll'within the outer member A. The provision of the slots 22 in the body 17 imparts a flexibility or resiliency to the latching members or dogs 15 so that said members may undergo limited radial movement. However, the inherent resiliency of the material of which the body is constructed will tend to maintain the latching dogs in their normal outward position. In such position the ex- When the locking sleeve is moved upwardly within the bore of the housing 17 to the position shown in FIGURE 2, the snap ring 33 disengages the groove 32 and engages a second groove 34 provided in the extreme lower end of the sleeve 26. When the sleeve moves upwardly, the annular projection 28 on said sleeve moves into alignment with the locking dogs 15 and the outer surface 28a of said projection contacts the inner surface 15:! of each dog. As will be explained, the sleeve 26 moves into this position after the locking dogs have engaged the locking recess 11 of the outer member A and it is evident that the engagement of the projection 28 will prevent movement of the dogs inwardly whereby said dogs are retained within 7 said locking recess.

ternal diameter of the circumferentially disposed dogs 15 I is somewhat larger than the diameter of the bore 10 of the outer housing A.

The body 17 being tubular has a bore extending entirely therethrough and an internal beveled shoulder 23 is formed in the upper end of said bore. Below the shoulder is a counterbore 24 and at the lower end of this counterbore a second annular internal shoulder 25 is provided. Since the collar 21, which is connected to the lower end of the body 17, is threaded into the lower end of the body, the upper Surface 21a of said collar provides a shoulder within the lower portion of the body.

Movable within the bore of the body 17 between the upper shoulder 23 and the internal shoulder 21a is the locking element or sleeve 26. This sleeve is adapted to co-act with the latching dogs 15 and, as clearly shown in FIGURE 2, said sleeve has its external diameter 27 substantially equal to the diameter of the counterbore portion 24 of the housing. The central portion of the sleeve is enlarged to form an elongate projection 28, the upper In the operation of the device the various parts of the inner coupling member B are in the position shown in FIGURE 1 and said member is connected to the conductor 19. The member B is then moved downwardly into the bore 10 of the member A and at this time the locking sleeve 26 is releasably latched in its lower position with respect to the dogs 15 by the snap ring 33. As has been noted, the latching members or dogs may undergo inward radial movement because said dogs are opposite the reduced upper end of sleeve 26. Therefore, as the inner member moves into the bore 10 of the outer member A, the latching dogs strike the inclined shoulder 14 and, due to their beveledlower ends 15c, are automatically moved inwardly so as to slide downwardly within the bore.

When the latching dogs reach the locking recess, said dogs will automatically spring out into the recess and the recess is of sufiicient length to permit continued downward movement of the inner member with respect to the outer member. As the parts move into the position shown in FIGURE 2, the lower end of the locking sleeve end of which is beveled at 29 with the lower end being formed witha horizontally disposed annular shoulder 30. Upward movement of the locking sleeve 26 within the body is limited by the engagement of the upper end of said sleeve with the annular upper shoulder 23 within the body and when the sleeve is in its uppermost position (FIGURE 2), a suitable O-ring or other seal 31 seals between the sleeve and the counterbore 24. Downward movement of the locking element or sleeve 26 within the housing is limited by engagement of the lower end 30 of the projection 28 with the shoulder 21a formed by the upper end of the collar 21. Thus the limits of movement of the sleeve are fixed by the spacing between shoulders 23 and 21a.

When the locking element or sleeve 26 is in its lowered position within the housing, as shown in FIGURE 1, the latching members or'dogs 15 are located opposite the upper end of the sleeve. Each dog is enlarged inwardly and its inner flat surface 15d is spaced from the external surface of the sleeve 26, with each dog being disposed above the external projection 28 on the sleeve. For releasably maintaining the sleeve in the lowered position of FIGURE 1, the lower portion of the sleeve is formedwith an external groove 32 which is engaged by a split resilient snap ring 33. The snap ring'functions to releasably hold the locking sleeve 26 in lowered position.

. member with respect to the outer member.

26 engages an upstanding annular stop member 35 which is threaded into a reduced portion 10a of the bore of the member A. An annular shoulder 36 adjacent the stop member 35 limits the downward movement of the inner The lower end of the locking sleeve 26 strikes the stop member 35 prior to the time that the lower end of the housing engages shoulder 36 and, therefore, the locking sleeve 26 is moved upwardly with respect to the housing. The snap ring 33 is disengaged from groove 32 and is reengaged with groove 34 in the manner shown in FIGURE 2.

The upward movement of the locking sleeve 26 to the position of FIGURE 2 locates the projection 28 opposite the latching dogs 15 and so long as the sleeve remains in this position inward movement of the locking dogs is prevented and said dogs are maintained Within the locking recess 11 of the outer member A.

After the parts have been moved to the position of FIGURE 2, any pressure within the bore of the outer member below the coupling will act in a direction to displace the inner member upwardly. This will move the parts to the position of FIGURE 3 where the shoulder 15b at the upper end of each locking dog engages the upper beveled surface 12 of the locking recess. The snap ring 33 maintains the locking sleeve in a position which will prevent inward movement of the latching dogs and the coupling device will firmly connect the parts.

When it is desired to release the connection and uncouple the members, it is only necessary to drop a ball or plug 37 (FIGURE 4) through the conductor 19. The ball will seat upon the upper end of the sleeve 26 and upon the application of pressure will move the sleeve 7 downwardly within the housing to its initial position.

force applied to the sleeve 26 to move said sleeve to the release position.

The coupling device may be used in any environment where it is desired to couple two members to each other but in FIGURE 12 one use of said device with multiple well packers is illustrated. As shown in this figure, three packers P1, P2 and P3 are adapted to be run into the well bore W on a tubing string T1 and are positioned to separate the production from three producing formations F1, F2 and F3. These packers are old in the art and any one of a number of packers now in general use may be employed. An example of this type of packer is illustrated on pages 935-936 in volume 1, Composite Catalog of Oil Field Equipment and Services (22nd edition, 1957), which is published by the Gulf Publishing Company, Houston Texas.

As illustrated in FIGURE 12, a second tubing string T2 is adapted to be connected through a J-slot or other releasable connection I with the upper packer P3 and a pipe section T3 has its upper end connected with said packer P3; this pipe section extends downwardly for connection with the packer P2. The outer housing A of the coupling device is located in the packer P2 while the inner member B is mounted on the lower end of the section T3 to make the connection.

In the use of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 12, the three packers P1, P2 and P3 are run on the string T1, which string has a safety joint S disposed between the packers P2 and P3. At the time that the packers are runv the connecting section T3 is placed in position connecting the packers P2 and P3. After the packers are in proper position, the second tubing string T2 is then lowered and coupled through the J-slot with the uppermost packer. In this type of installation a third string (not shown) is also connected with upper packer P3 to conduct fluids from the upper formation. In removing the assembly the string T2 as well as the third tubing string (not shown) are first removed. Tubing T1 is then manipulated to disconnect the safety joint S'in the manner shown in FIGURE 12 and this disconnects upper packer P3 from the intermediate packer P2; at this time it is necessary that a straight longitudinal lifting on the pipe T1 will result in a disconnection between section T3 and the intermediate packer. By utilizing the coupling device of this invention as the connecting means between the pipe T3 and the intermediate packer, release may be accomplished by a straight-line motion.

In FIGURES 7 and 8 a modified form of the invention is illustrated. In this form an outer coupling member of housing A1 is formed with a locking recess 111; the upper end of the recess is defined by a beveled shoulder 112 while the lower end thereof is defined by an enlarged stop shoulder 113. The upper end of the bore 110 of member A is suitably inclined at 114.

The inner member is constructed of a tubular body 117 and said body is preferably formed of an upper section 117a and a lower section 11717 which are suitably threaded together. An annular packing 1211 is mounted on the body. Suspended from the lower end of the body are resilient latching dogs 115 with each dog being provided with a central flat surface 1151:, an upper beveled surface 11511 and a lower beveled surface 1150. The latching dogs are suspended from an annular shoulder 41) which is provided on the lower end of the body 117.

Movable within the lower portion of the bore of the body between an internal annular shoulder 123 and an internal shoulder 121 is a locking sleeve 126. The extreme upper end of the sleeve is reduced as shown at 126a to form an external annular shoulder 41. This shoulder is adapted to engage beneath a snap ring 133 similar to the snap ring of the first form. Spaced below the shoulder is an annular groove 134, which when the sleeve 126 is in a raised. position, is engaged by the snap ring. The lower end of the sleeve 126 projects down- 6 wardly below the latching dogs 115 and carries a locking collar or projection 128.

In the operation of this form the inner member B1 is lowered into the outer member A1 with the parts in the position of FIGURE 7. At this time the locking sleeve 128 is latched against movement within the bore of the housing 117. As the inner member moves into the position shown in FIGURE 8 where the latching dogs 115 are opposite the recess, the lower end of the locking sleeve 126 engages the shoulder 113. Continued downward movement of the member B1 causes the inner surfaces of the latching dogs 115 to become aligned with the enlarged collar or projection 128, as shown in FIGURE 8. At this time the snap ring 133 has moved into engagement with the groove 134 of sleeve 126 to latch the sleeve in its locking position. Thereafter, any pressure from below the member B1 would merely slide the entire assembly upwardly to engage the shoulders 11512 of the dogs 115 with the internal shoulder 112 of the locking recess. So long as sleeve 126 remains in the position shown in FIGURE 8 with respect to the dogs 115, said dogs are maintained against disengagement from the recess 111.

The release of the inner member from the outer member in this form is eifected by dropping or pumping a plug or ball and applying pressure to sleeve 126 or a wire line tool may be lowered and a downward jar applied to said sleeve to move the sleeve back to the position of FIGURE 7. Of course at this time the inner locking sleeve has its lower end spaced above the shoulder 113 which will allow downward movement of the sleeve relative to the latching dogs. As the sleeve moves downwardly, the projection 12% also moves downwardly below the dogs to permit said dogs to be retracted whereby the coupling may be disengaged.

With respect to the form of the invention of FIGURES 7 and .8, it would be possible to employ this form without the stop shoulder 113. In such case the external diameter 115d of the upper end of the latching dogs 115 would be less than the diameter of the bore 116 of the housing A1 so as to provide a clearance between these parts. The length of the latching dogs is such that when the dogs are suspended from the supporting shoulder 40, the lower ends of said dogs are aligned with the locking collar 128.

With the external surface of the upper portion of the latching dog body having a free clearance within the bore of the outer housing A1, it will be evident that as soon as the. enlarged lower ends of or the latching dogs move opposite the recess, the weight of the latching dog assembly will cause the same to slide downwardly from the position of FIGURE 7 to the positionv of FIG- URE 8; in such position the locking collar or enlargement 128 is behind the latching dogs and will prevent their inward movement. Any pressure below the unit will merely move the shoulder 1151) of each latching dog into engagement with the upper shoulder 112 of the locking recess and the members of the coupling device can not be separated. The release of this form would be effected in the same manner as heretofore described. Obviously, where the clearance is provided between the external diameter 115a of the latching dogs and the bore of the housing, the stop shoulder 113 may be completely eliminated since movement of the partsinto locking position as shown in FIGURE 8, will beautomatically efiected as the dog members move opposite the locking recess.

In FIGURES 9 and 10 still another modification is shown. In this form the outer coupling member A2 hasits bore 210 formed with alocking recess 211. The inner coupling member 132 is constructed similarly to the member 13 of the first form in that it includes a tubular housing 217 having the latching dogs 215 which are similar in construction to the dogs 115. An internal shoulder 2.23 is formed within the upper portion of the bore of the housing 217.

Instead of the locking sleeve 26, the form shown in FIGURE 9 includes a locking sleeve 226. This sleeve carries a snap ring 233 in its upper end which is engageable with an annular groove 234 provided in the bore of the housing below the shoulder 223. When the ring 233 is engaged with the groove, the locking sleeve 226 is in its raised position with respect to the dogs and said dogs are opposite a recessed portion 226a in the external surface of the sleeve. In this position the dogs 215 may undergo inward radial movement whereby said dogs may enter the bore 210 of coupling member A2 and move into position opposite the locking recess 211.

When the locking sleeve 226 is moved downwardly, a snap ring 333 at its lower end is engageable within an annular groove 334 provided in the lower end of the housing 217 to latch the sleeve in lowered position (FIG- URE When in such position, an enlarged portion 228 of the locking sleeve moves opposite the inner surfaces of the latching dogs 215 to retain them within the recess.

The operation of this form is substantially similar to the other forms heretofore described. The parts of the inner member B2 are in the position of FIGURE 9 within the sleeve 226 maintained in its upper position by the snap ring 234. After the latching dogs 215 have moved opposite the locking recess 211, which positioning is controlled by the lower end of the housing 217 engaging a stop shoulder 213 in the outer member A2, a suitable actuating tool T is lowered by means of a wire line 50. The tool T is provided with spring pressed elements 51 which are engageable with an internal shoulder 52 formed within the bore of the sleeve. By connecting suitable jars in .the line 50, a downward jarring on the sleeve 226 may be elfected to move the sleeve to the position shown in FIGURE 10. In such position the enlarged portion 228 of the Sleeve moves behind the latching dogs 215 and maintains the same within the locking recess.

When it is desired to release the connection of FIG- URES 9 and 10, a releasing tool T1, shown schematically in FIGURE ll, is lowered by means of the wire line 50.

This tool has spring pressed dogs 51a which are directed upwardly and which are adapted to engage a shoulder 53 within the bore of the sleeve. An upward pull may thus be applied to the sleeve 226 to return it to the posi tion of FIGURE 9 whereby the dogs 215 may be retracted from the locking recess 211. a

It is pointed out that in the form shown in FIGURES 9 and 10 the locking sleeve 226 is actuated by mechanical means. However, the upper end of the locking sleeve 226 could 'be extended inwardly so as to provide a seat for the reception of a ball or plug and it would be possible to lower the sleeve with respect to the dogs by means of fluid pressure. Similarly, if desired, the sleeves 26'and 1260f the othcrforms of the invention could be provided withthe shoulders 52and 53 so as to be capable of actuation by mechanical means. In all forms of the invention a locking element orsleeve is employed for co-action with the locking dogs in a manner to assure that said dogs can not be. disengaged until said sleeve is actuated. The device. thus provides a positive coupling means which can not be unintentionally or prematurely disconnected. It is pointed out that where the device is used with long strings of well tubing, itmay occur that the tubing will shrink and unlessa positive connection is maintained, the members of the coupling-device might be separated. With the present arrangement it is impossible to disconnect the 7 members of the device until the locking sleeve is in the proper position. WhatI claim is:

l; A coupling device including, an outer tubular housing having an annular locking reccss'in the" wall of its bore, an inner member insertable into the bore of the outer member, said inner member comprising a tubular body, a latching dog mounted for lateral movement on the body, means normally urging the dog to a radially outward position, said latching dog being movable outwardly into the locking recess of the outer member when the inner member is fully inserted into the outer member, a locking sleeve slidably mounted within the bore of the tubular body and having an external projection on its outer surface, said sleeve being movable to a lower position within the body in which said projection is below the latching dog to allow lateral movement of the dog and also being movable to an upper position within the body in which position the projection is aligned and coacts with said dog to prevent lateral movement of said dog and maintain it in position engaging the locking recess, and an abutment within the outer housing engageable by the lower end of the locking sleeve as the tubular body is fully inserted into the housing for moving said locking sleeve from said lower position to said upper position within the bory whereby the projection on said sleeve is moved into lateral alignment with the latching dog to thereafter prevent inward radial movement of said dog.-

2. A coupling device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the abutment which is engageable by the locking sleeve is an annular shoulder within the outer housing located to be engaged by the locking sleeve prior to the time that the tubular body of the inner member is completely inserted within the outer housing.

3. A coupling device including an outer tubular housing having an annular locking recess in the wall of its bore, an inner member insertable into the bore of the outer member, said inner member comprising a tubular body, latching dogs mounted on the body for lateral movement and engageable within the locking recess of the outer member when the inner member is moved into said outer member, means for resiliently urging the dogs outwardly of the body, the locking recess extending longitudinally a substantially greater distance than the vertical extent of each dog whereby said dogs and the body on which they are mounted may undergo limited movement relative to the housing after said dogs are disposed in said recess, a locking sleeve movable between limits within the bore of the body of the inner member whereby the sleeve may assume different positions with respect to the tubular body and latching dogs, said sleeve having a reduced portion which is adapted to be located opposite the latching dogs when said sleeve is in a lower position relative to the body, the sleeve also having a projection adapted to be disposed opposite the dogs when the sleeve is in an upper position relative to the body, retaining means on said sleeve and on said body for releasably retaining the locking sleeve in its lower position within the body with its reduced portion opposite the latching dogs whereby the latching dogs may undergo inward radial movement, means for moving the locking sleeve longitudinally upwardly relative to the body to locate the projection of said sleeve opposite the latching dogs after said dogs have engaged within the locking recess of the outer member, whereby inward radial movement of said dogs is prevented and the dogs are maintained in engagement with the locking recess.

4. A coupling device as set forth in claim 3, wherein the means for moving the locking sleeve upwardly comprises an annular abutment within the housing which is engageable by said sleeve prior to the time that the tubular body of the inner member is fully inserted into said outer housing. 7

5.. A coupling device as set forth in claim 3, wherein the means for moving the locking sleeve upwardly comprises an annular abutment within the housing which is engageable by said sleeve prior to the time that the tubular body of the inner member is fully inserted into said outer housing. I j

6. A, coupling device as set forth in claim '1, together with a releasable means for releasably latching said locking sleeve, in its lower position within said tubular body and for releasably latching said locking sleeve in its upper position within said tubular body, said releasable means including at least one resilient holding means cooperating with an adjacent surface, said holding means and said adjacent surface being located one on said locking sleeve and one on said tubular body.

7. A coupling device as set forth in claim 6, wherein said resilient holding means is disengaged to release said locking sleeve from its lower position within the tubular body by the force applied to the locking sleeve by reason of its engagement with the abutment within said outer housing, and hydraulically-actuated means for releasing said releasable holding means from a position latching said locking sleeve in its upper position within said tubular body.

8. A coupling device as set forth in claim 6, wherein said resilient holding means is disengaged to release said locking sleeve from its lower position within the tubular body by the force applied to the locking sleeve by reason of its engagement with the abutment within said outer housing, and a closure lowerable into position closing the upper end of the locking sleeve, whereby fluid pressure may be applied to said closure to disengage the releasable holding means and thereafter move said locking sleeve from its upper position to its lower position within the body so that the projection on said sleeve is again below the latching dog to allow subsequent inward movement of the dog.

9. A coupling device as set forth in claim 3 wherein the means for moving the locking sleeve upwardly comprises an annular abutment within the housing which is engageable by said sleeve prior to the time that the tubular body of the inner member is fully inserted into said outer housing, and a closure adapted to be lowered to seat on the upper end of the locking sleeve after the locking sleeve has been moved upwardly relative to the body, whereby pressure fluid may be applied against the closure and sleeve, to move said sleeve to its lower position within the body.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,155,620 Scaramucci Apr. 25, 1939 2,778,433 Brown Jan. 22, 1957 2,822,048 Tlausch Feb. 4, 1958 2,846,014 Daffin et a1. Aug. 5, 1958 2,862,560 Bostock et a1 Dec. 2, 1958 2,885,011 Frost May 5, 1959 2,927,640 Kenneday Mar. 8, 1960

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Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3288493 *Feb 28, 1964Nov 29, 1966Brown Oil ToolsCoupling device for underwater wellheads
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Classifications
U.S. Classification285/18, 285/315, 285/922, 285/82, 285/351, 166/181
International ClassificationE21B43/14, E21B17/046, E21B17/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S285/922, E21B17/046, E21B43/14, E21B17/06
European ClassificationE21B17/06, E21B17/046, E21B43/14